How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?

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How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« on: January 29, 2015, 01:40:27 PM »
The title says everything, if you go to, let's say, an ocean, and look towards the horizon, you can clearly see the horizon bending.
Also, the thing about ship's sails, how can they be seen first on a flat earth??


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robintex

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2015, 02:12:14 PM »
The title says everything, if you go to, let's say, an ocean, and look towards the horizon, you can clearly see the horizon bending.
Also, the thing about ship's sails, how can they be seen first on a flat earth??

I am guessing at flat earth answers:
1.You can see the ship's sails because of Bendy Light.
2.If a ship sails over the horizon you can restore it to sight with a telescope.
3.The horizon just fades away into the distance.

Flat Earthers, feel free to correct these if I am wrong.I am guessing at these from previous Flat Earth Theories (?) on this website.
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Chorus:
Yes ! Never, never, never,  ever go to sea !

Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2015, 02:19:55 PM »
Why would the telescope matter? It's just a lense...

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Lemmiwinks

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2015, 02:24:58 PM »
Why would the telescope matter? It's just a lense...

Because if the earth is flat, and its just the fact that a ship has moved too far for the human eye to see, and not slip under a horizon due to curvature, then you should be able to recapture it, or see it again by looking at it with a telescope.
I have 13 [academic qualifications] actually. I'll leave it up to you to guess which, or simply call me a  liar. Either is fine.

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robintex

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2015, 02:41:08 PM »
Why would the telescope matter? It's just a lense...

Ask Dr.Samuel Birley Rowbotham, PhD,MD or one  of his followers.
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Chorus:
Yes ! Never, never, never,  ever go to sea !

Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2015, 03:09:29 PM »
One explanation is that it is due to perspective lines shrink things at the horizon.  But it does not explain why it is 'bottom' up.  Also it doesn't explain why the same perspective shrinking does not happen side to side.  Somewhere I saw a copy of an article that was posted on FET that was decades old and printed in some news paper in which the author was claiming he could see the bottom of a ship far off in the distance.  So this one old account is taken to be the final word on the matter.  FET is much easier to understand if you just stop listening after 'Because...'.

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sceptimatic

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2015, 03:28:18 AM »
One explanation is that it is due to perspective lines shrink things at the horizon.  But it does not explain why it is 'bottom' up.  Also it doesn't explain why the same perspective shrinking does not happen side to side.  Somewhere I saw a copy of an article that was posted on FET that was decades old and printed in some news paper in which the author was claiming he could see the bottom of a ship far off in the distance.  So this one old account is taken to be the final word on the matter.  FET is much easier to understand if you just stop listening after 'Because...'.
Think about the shape of your eye and think about how it views things. Your eye is concave. It's not a flat eye.
The light to your eye is going to differ over distance.

Stand on the beach and look out to sea. You may not be conscious of this but you can see the beach even though you're looking at a ship out to sea. Why?
Because your eye is concave. It views from all angles.

So if you're looking directly ahead the ight is hitting to top of your concave pupil and less so at the bottom of anything you are viewing, especially the further away it gets.
So thinking on that, your eye loses the hull of a ship because the bottom is only taking the light in from the reflection so far out. Basically you drop into the sea which becomes your horizon line.
It doesn't change at the sides because your eyes are still wide angled, taking in the light either side. The top part of your concave eye, catches the top of the ship/mast because it still reflects the light.

If you notice with your pupil, it acts like a telescope as well. It widens to take in as much light as possible when the light becomes dull and when it's bright, it shrinks to focus.

Your eyes are just shit telescopes.

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mikeman7918

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2015, 11:43:13 AM »
One explanation is that it is due to perspective lines shrink things at the horizon.  But it does not explain why it is 'bottom' up.  Also it doesn't explain why the same perspective shrinking does not happen side to side.  Somewhere I saw a copy of an article that was posted on FET that was decades old and printed in some news paper in which the author was claiming he could see the bottom of a ship far off in the distance.  So this one old account is taken to be the final word on the matter.  FET is much easier to understand if you just stop listening after 'Because...'.
Think about the shape of your eye and think about how it views things. Your eye is concave. It's not a flat eye.
The light to your eye is going to differ over distance.

Stand on the beach and look out to sea. You may not be conscious of this but you can see the beach even though you're looking at a ship out to sea. Why?
Because your eye is concave. It views from all angles.

So if you're looking directly ahead the ight is hitting to top of your concave pupil and less so at the bottom of anything you are viewing, especially the further away it gets.
So thinking on that, your eye loses the hull of a ship because the bottom is only taking the light in from the reflection so far out. Basically you drop into the sea which becomes your horizon line.
It doesn't change at the sides because your eyes are still wide angled, taking in the light either side. The top part of your concave eye, catches the top of the ship/mast because it still reflects the light.

If you notice with your pupil, it acts like a telescope as well. It widens to take in as much light as possible when the light becomes dull and when it's bright, it shrinks to focus.

Your eyes are just shit telescopes.

Most of what I know about optics I learned from reading the user manual for my telescope and yet it still seems that I know more about optics then you.  Distance has no effect otger then making objects appear smaller and where the light hits your retina is dependent on the direction that the light is coming from.  Learning is fun, you should try it some time.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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HumanKentipede

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Re: How can the horizon be slighty bent in a flat earth?
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2015, 04:01:41 AM »
One explanation is that it is due to perspective lines shrink things at the horizon.  But it does not explain why it is 'bottom' up.  Also it doesn't explain why the same perspective shrinking does not happen side to side.  Somewhere I saw a copy of an article that was posted on FET that was decades old and printed in some news paper in which the author was claiming he could see the bottom of a ship far off in the distance.  So this one old account is taken to be the final word on the matter.  FET is much easier to understand if you just stop listening after 'Because...'.
Think about the shape of your eye and think about how it views things. Your eye is concave. It's not a flat eye.
The light to your eye is going to differ over distance.

Stand on the beach and look out to sea. You may not be conscious of this but you can see the beach even though you're looking at a ship out to sea. Why?
Because your eye is concave. It views from all angles.

So if you're looking directly ahead the ight is hitting to top of your concave pupil and less so at the bottom of anything you are viewing, especially the further away it gets.
So thinking on that, your eye loses the hull of a ship because the bottom is only taking the light in from the reflection so far out. Basically you drop into the sea which becomes your horizon line.
It doesn't change at the sides because your eyes are still wide angled, taking in the light either side. The top part of your concave eye, catches the top of the ship/mast because it still reflects the light.

If you notice with your pupil, it acts like a telescope as well. It widens to take in as much light as possible when the light becomes dull and when it's bright, it shrinks to focus.

Your eyes are just shit telescopes.
looks like scepti is getting rolled on all fronts!
Most of what I know about optics I learned from reading the user manual for my telescope and yet it still seems that I know more about optics then you.  Distance has no effect otger then making objects appear smaller and where the light hits your retina is dependent on the direction that the light is coming from.  Learning is fun, you should try it some time.
Leatherman: Leave nothing undone.