Why doesn't the earth rip apart?

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Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« on: January 17, 2015, 09:38:25 PM »
I know someone mention this in another thread, but it needs its own.  Countless tests have shown that the earths "gravity" is not constant.  I will vary slightly depending on your location.  If universal acceleration is pushing flat earth up at different rates wouldn't the earth be torn to shreds? 

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guv

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2015, 10:24:54 PM »
Get an air blower and try to blow a flat disk straight up. UA fails in lots of ways. A few seconds of UA and you would have earthquakes and the world would be flying off at all sorts of angles. Dream up a better idea, and try being honest. My compost bin is full.

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ausGeoff

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2015, 11:04:37 PM »
This is an oceanic gravity map.....


                             [Science, Vol. 346, No. 6205, pp. 65-67]


The different colours show the anomalies in the mGal readings obtained from the CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 satellites.  The gal is defined as 1 centimetre per second squared (1 cm/s2). The milligal (mGal) refers to one thousandth of a gal.

How does the flat earth theory of universal acceleration account for the differences across the planet's surface of the mGal readings of  200 to +250 from the mean?

As amgtree has suggested, wouldn't this cause massive destruction of the (flat) planet in a matter of seconds?

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2015, 03:21:32 AM »
I know someone mention this in another thread, but it needs its own.  Countless tests have shown that the earths "gravity" is not constant.  I will vary slightly depending on your location.  If universal acceleration is pushing flat earth up at different rates wouldn't the earth be torn to shreds?
Short answer: magic.

Long answer: there isn't one.
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Son of Orospu

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2015, 05:09:49 AM »
Short answer: magic.

Long answer: there isn't one.

Crabby Jim, this is your last warning for low content posting in the upper fora.

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2015, 05:20:00 AM »
Short answer: magic.

Long answer: there isn't one.

Crabby Jim, this is your last warning for low content posting in the upper fora.
Are you kidding me?  That answer was entirely accurate and to the point.  Seriously, what else is there to say?

Arbitrary moderation is arbitrary.
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2015, 05:20:25 PM »
Short answer: magic.

Long answer: there isn't one.

Crabby Jim, this is your last warning for low content posting in the upper fora.
Are you kidding me?  That answer was entirely accurate and to the point.  Seriously, what else is there to say?

Arbitrary moderation is arbitrary.
I kinda agree with you crab.  There is no logical explanation!  If you want to judge people jroa why don't you give a legitimate answer? 


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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2015, 05:49:54 AM »
9.8 m/s/s is not that great of an acceleration.  +or- a tiny amount is even less.  Why would this rip the Earth apart?  It is like saying that leaning against my house will make it collapse.  People draw some very odd conclusions here. 

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2015, 06:26:49 AM »
9.8 m/s/s is not that great of an acceleration.
It is of course the differences in acceleration that would rip the planet apart in the blink of an eye.  How can each part of the earth accelerate at a different rate and it not tear itself apart

Lets keep in mind that in your model the earth is already travelling at a speed so close to the speed of light that the difference would not be measurable.  Which would just make our destruction so much more spectacular.
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Son of Orospu

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2015, 06:37:50 AM »
I have a box sitting on my table.  I pushed it at as close to 9.8 m/s/s as I could estimate, and guess what?  It did not fall apart.  Perhaps your peoples claim that a tiny fraction of that differential acceleration would rip the world apart is wrong, or is my  box really stronger than the world?

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Slemon

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2015, 06:46:43 AM »
9.8 m/s/s is not that great of an acceleration.  +or- a tiny amount is even less.  Why would this rip the Earth apart?  It is like saying that leaning against my house will make it collapse.  People draw some very odd conclusions here.
Sustained, long-term acceleration will do damage no matter what, especially on something the size of even a flat Earth. The forces involved are incredible.
The fact this acceleration varies means the world's being pushed along with radically different forces all over its surface, and has been for thousands of years. If you really think it wouldn't have been shredded by now, you're wrong, and there's no two ways about it.

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2015, 07:04:22 AM »
If I get a rock out of the creek in my back yard, and then walk to the top of the nearest peak, will the rock fall apart because of the differential gravity?  No?  Well then, perhaps your theory is flawed. 

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Slemon

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2015, 07:14:45 AM »
If I get a rock out of the creek in my back yard, and then walk to the top of the nearest peak, will the rock fall apart because of the differential gravity?  No?  Well then, perhaps your theory is flawed.
Or your analogy is about as relevant as throwing a pizza out a window and saying 'ta-da'.

Your rock would have to have different parts of it moving at different rates. Then you need to keep all those sections moving at those accelerations: which is what FET requires. Different parts have different accelerations, in the same body. Some of the rock will be moving a centimetre a second faster, maybe. How exactly would that hold together?

You can't come up with any good example of how this could work, because it doesn't happen. It can't happen. Something can't accelerate at varying rates and hold together.

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2015, 07:48:39 AM »
I have a box sitting on my table.  I pushed it at as close to 9.8 m/s/s as I could estimate, and guess what?  It did not fall apart. 
Now accelerate one part of the box at 9.7 m/s/s and the other at 9.9 m/s/s, indefinitely.  What happens now?


From a standing start, if one part of the earth accelerated at 9.81 m/s/s it would be travelling at 309,580,056 m/s after one year.

If another part of the earth was accelerated at 9.79 m/s/s it would be travelling at 308,948,904 m/s after the year.

So, after one year the speed difference between the 2 parts would be 631,152 m/s or 1,411,846 mph.  How, exactly, has the planet not torn itself apart?

jroa, you claim to have a physics degree, yet struggle with concepts even my cat can understand  ???
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Son of Orospu

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2015, 07:58:09 AM »
jroa, you claim to have a physics degree, yet struggle with concepts even my cat can understand  ???

I never claimed to have a degree in physics.  I may have claimed to have taken physics classes and that I have two science degrees, but neither of them have a major in physics.  Why are you putting words into my mouth?

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2015, 08:03:30 AM »
If I get a rock out of the creek in my back yard, and then walk to the top of the nearest peak, will the rock fall apart because of the differential gravity?  No?  Well then, perhaps your theory is flawed.

s = 1/2at2

Distance traveled is one-half acceleration times time squared.

If you accelerate, say, the center of a deformable flat disc at 9.80 m/s2 and the edge at 9.81 m/s2, after one second, the center would have traveled 4.90 meters and the edge 4.905 meters. Since it can be deformed, the center is lagging behind the edge by 5 mm. One second later, the center will have traveled 19.60 m and the edge, 19.62 m; the center in now 2 cm behind.

Distances traveled (meters) after accelerating at 9.80 and 9.81 m/sec2 for different times:
  Time (sec) 
  Lower Accel. (meters traveled) 
  Higher Accel. (meters traveled) 
1
4.900
4.905
2
19.600
19.620
3
44.100
44.145
60
17640
17658
3600
63,504,000
63,568,800
86400
36,578,304,000
36,615,628,800

After only one minute, the slower part is 18 meters behind the faster part. After an hour, it's 64.8 kilometers behind. After only a day (86400 seconds), the slower part is lagging by 37,324.8 kilometers. Thus, "Why doesn't the earth rip apart?"
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2015, 08:11:23 AM »
jroa, you claim to have a physics degree, yet struggle with concepts even my cat can understand  ???

I never claimed to have a degree in physics.  I may have claimed to have taken physics classes and that I have two science degrees, but neither of them have a major in physics.  Why are you putting words into my mouth?
You not going to address the rest of my post?
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

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ausGeoff

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2015, 08:51:15 AM »
I have a box sitting on my table.  I pushed it at as close to 9.8 m/s/s as I could estimate, and guess what?  It did not fall apart.  Perhaps your peoples claim that a tiny fraction of that differential acceleration would rip the world apart is wrong, or is my  box really stronger than the world?

And this fact is logically—and scientifically—explained because your cardboard box is a nominally rigid structure, all parts of which you are accelerating at an identical rate.

On the other hand, the FE hypotheses of "universal acceleration" has the summit of Mt Everest accelerating "upwards" at a different rate of acceleration to the Sahara Desert.  This is obviously a physical impossibility, and would mean that the Indian sub-continent would break away from the African continent in seconds.

And both of your conclusions are erroneous.  Sorry.

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macrohard

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2015, 12:37:36 PM »
If I get a rock out of the creek in my back yard, and then walk to the top of the nearest peak, will the rock fall apart because of the differential gravity?  No?  Well then, perhaps your theory is flawed.

This "example" isn't the least bit related to the question at hand.  If you're going to build a straw man, at least try to make it resemble a man.

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Vauxhall

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2015, 12:47:01 PM »
On the other hand, the FE hypotheses of "universal acceleration" has the summit of Mt Everest accelerating "upwards" at a different rate of acceleration to the Sahara Desert.  This is obviously a physical impossibility, and would mean that the Indian sub-continent would break away from the African continent in seconds.

Where did you come up with this hogwash?  I'm asking because it's blatantly wrong.
Read the FAQS.

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macrohard

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2015, 12:58:56 PM »
On the other hand, the FE hypotheses of "universal acceleration" has the summit of Mt Everest accelerating "upwards" at a different rate of acceleration to the Sahara Desert.  This is obviously a physical impossibility, and would mean that the Indian sub-continent would break away from the African continent in seconds.

Where did you come up with this hogwash?  I'm asking because it's blatantly wrong.

Please clarify what, specifically, is wrong.  A catch all "its wing" doesn't leave much for debate.

The differences in acceleration is measurable.  Now obviously none of us here on this forum took the measurements ourselves.  Perhaps this is another layer of the conspiracy.

IF the accelerations were different, the earth would change typography very rapidly (see a few posts above for calculations).

I assume your claim is that the acceleration all across earth is in fact uniform at all locations and elevations.

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Vauxhall

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #21 on: January 20, 2015, 01:03:53 PM »
I assume your claim is that the acceleration all across earth is in fact uniform at all locations and elevations.

That is my claim, yes. That is the claim of UA.


These measurements you speak of... how were they taken exactly? What instruments were used? When were the measurements taken?
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macrohard

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2015, 01:08:15 PM »
I assume your claim is that the acceleration all across earth is in fact uniform at all locations and elevations.

That is my claim, yes. That is the claim of UA.


These measurements you speak of... how were they taken exactly? What instruments were used? When were the measurements taken?

Taken with a gravimeter, and done periodically by many people and agencies across the world.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravimeter

According to that they are so sensitive that it can detect the change in gravity as snow is shoveled off the roof above the sensor.

Of course, I have not used or even seen one in person, so perhaps these are fictional devices or the output is fabricated.

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Vauxhall

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2015, 01:14:51 PM »
I assume your claim is that the acceleration all across earth is in fact uniform at all locations and elevations.

That is my claim, yes. That is the claim of UA.


These measurements you speak of... how were they taken exactly? What instruments were used? When were the measurements taken?

Taken with a gravimeter, and done periodically by many people and agencies across the world.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravimeter

According to that they are so sensitive that it can detect the change in gravity as snow is shoveled off the roof above the sensor.

Of course, I have not used or even seen one in person, so perhaps these are fictional devices or the output is fabricated.

How can you measure a force that does not exist? Gravimeters give erroneous data based on a round Earth model. They are pre-programmed pieces of junk tech.

Do you have anything more reliable?
Read the FAQS.

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2015, 01:16:45 PM »
The differences in acceleration is measurable.  Now obviously none of us here on this forum took the measurements ourselves.  Perhaps this is another layer of the conspiracy.
I have. The assertion that the acceleration of gravity is the same at every point on or near the surface of the Earth is incorrect.

One common exercise in introductory geophysics classes is to estimate the height of a building by measuring the change in acceleration of gravity from the ground floor to the top floor (or roof, if it's accessible).

[Edit] Oops... omitted "is the same"
« Last Edit: January 20, 2015, 01:20:59 PM by Alpha2Omega »
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2015, 01:34:30 PM »
I assume your claim is that the acceleration all across earth is in fact uniform at all locations and elevations.

That is my claim, yes. That is the claim of UA.


These measurements you speak of... how were they taken exactly? What instruments were used? When were the measurements taken?

Taken with a gravimeter, and done periodically by many people and agencies across the world.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravimeter

According to that they are so sensitive that it can detect the change in gravity as snow is shoveled off the roof above the sensor.

Of course, I have not used or even seen one in person, so perhaps these are fictional devices or the output is fabricated.

How can you measure a force that does not exist? Gravimeters give erroneous data based on a round Earth model. They are pre-programmed pieces of junk tech.

Do you have anything more reliable?

Gravimeters don't care about the shape of the Earth. They just measure the force (or, more commonly, changes in force) exerted on them. How would a gravimeter know how to give repeatable measurements when re-measuring a previously-measured station after being moved? This is common practice - each point is measured several times over the course of a gravity survey.

It seems to me you're talking through your hat.


"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Vauxhall

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2015, 01:52:29 PM »
It seems to me you're talking through your hat.

I don't wear hats.

Could you please explain to me the components used to make a gravimeter and exactly how they operate without using google?

Thanks in advance.
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Misero

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2015, 01:55:58 PM »
It seems to me you're talking through your hat.

I don't wear hats.

Could you please explain to me the components used to make a gravimeter and exactly how they operate without using google?

Thanks in advance.
Again strengthening my idea of banning links on this site, as, according to FE'ers, all outside sources are lies.
I am the worst moderator ever.

Sometimes I wonder: "Why am  I on this site?"
Then I look at threads about clouds not existing and I go back to posting and lurking. Lurk moar.

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Slemon

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2015, 02:03:38 PM »
Could you please explain to me the components used to make a gravimeter and exactly how they operate without using google?

Thanks in advance.

Simple gravimeter: weight on a spring. I verified that with a google, but worked it out myself. Get a spring with the right resistance, put a weight on top, measure how it depresses: measure how it depresses electronically (with a finer spring) for expert measurements.
Of course, that's a highly simplified version. I don't know whether it has the kind of detail needed here, I doubt it, but that's hardly surprising. You'd need an awful lot of knowledge of electrical systems to answer this question: a failed answer to your question says nothing except 'engineers have better things to do than talk about whether or not the Earth is a flat disc and home to Mulder's wet dream'.
Gravimeters are possible, and I can see how a suitably designed one could detect smaller changes.

Now, question for you: why would every single person lie about what they've found?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Why doesn't the earth rip apart?
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2015, 02:06:52 PM »
Gravitometers are measuring something.  The assertion that this must prove gravity is just plain wrong.  They could be measuring any force and RE indoctrination makes people believe it is gravity.