Is Google in on it?

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Vauxhall

  • 5914
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Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2015, 11:19:37 AM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
Read the FAQS.

Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2015, 12:26:09 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.

I had no intention of posting any verification whatsoever. But thanks for your permission not to. And your admission that I'm ahead, now that I have exposed your logical fallacy that I don't have a name for - sort of the inverse of Appeal to Authority I suppose. Where someone's testimony is rejected out of hand because it would be inconvenient if it were true, whereas something statistically less likely is accepted without question because it is of no detriment to your argument.
Founder member of the League Of Scientific Gentlemen and Mademoiselles des Connaissances.
I am pompous, self-righteous, thin skinned, and smug.

Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2015, 12:29:23 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
If you have evidence how balloons work with GPS then please provide it.

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Misero

  • 1261
  • Of course it's flat. It looks that way up close.
Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2015, 12:55:05 PM »
So when can I get the location of one of these? I want to shoot down one of them balloons. And don't say the stuff is unbreakable. I mean to wrap a rope around it or something like that and bring it to me.
I am the worst moderator ever.

Sometimes I wonder: "Why am  I on this site?"
Then I look at threads about clouds not existing and I go back to posting and lurking. Lurk moar.

Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2015, 01:10:09 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.

Brilliant. Present someone with science that is backed up by decades of quality evidence and it is dismissed but find a made up claim like Roswell with literally no evidence whatsoever an it is stated as fact........
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2015, 03:23:14 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
So about that roswell incident... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

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Lemmiwinks

  • 2161
  • President of the Non-Conformist Zetetic Council
Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2015, 03:27:26 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.

Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
So about that roswell incident... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

You'll find that even though their own wiki is cited for everything, as soon as a REr uses wikipedia, it is called out for "just being wikipedia".
« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 03:30:25 PM by Lemmiwinks »
I have 13 [academic qualifications] actually. I'll leave it up to you to guess which, or simply call me a  liar. Either is fine.

Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur

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Misero

  • 1261
  • Of course it's flat. It looks that way up close.
Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2015, 12:19:46 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.
AGAIN LEMMIWINKS?

Wow. That's 4 decent debates that nobody honestly answered, revived by you. Maybe, just maybe one of these times we can sort out an issue without it being buried.
Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
So about that roswell incident... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

You'll find that even though their own wiki is cited for everything, as soon as a REr uses wikipedia, it is called out for "just being wikipedia".
I am the worst moderator ever.

Sometimes I wonder: "Why am  I on this site?"
Then I look at threads about clouds not existing and I go back to posting and lurking. Lurk moar.

*

Lemmiwinks

  • 2161
  • President of the Non-Conformist Zetetic Council
Re: Is Google in on it?
« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2015, 12:57:47 PM »
Do you have any idea how many people Google employs? Clearly not. It is actually a matter of public record, and you can Google it.  :P
And when you see the figure, it's really not so baseless after all. It's not like I'm claiming to be an astronaut or something.

It's just occurred to me, if I said I worked for Lulu's Sandwich Shop, Vauxhall would undoubtedly accept it without question. Even though that establishment only has four employees, making the probability that I work there much smaller.
Wow, more baseless claims. I will not accept your profession without proof, which I'm not recommending that you post here due to the personal information involved. So it would be better if you stop while you're ahead.



Most weather balloons are expendable and go on a one-way trip, upward, until they burst.

This is not the case with these balloons. Are you familiar with the Roswell incident? During the investigation a material was found that seemed to be tin foil, but was virtually indestructible. It was dubbed "memory foil", because when crushed it warped back into a sheet-like foil. Funnily enough, Roswell was waved off by government officials as a "weather balloon" crash. Many took this as a fake explanation to hide the fact that they found an alien spacecraft, but those people would be wrong. It was a weather balloon, and it was made from the same material that they are currently made from: memory foil.
So about that roswell incident... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roswell_UFO_incident

You'll find that even though their own wiki is cited for everything, as soon as a REr uses wikipedia, it is called out for "just being wikipedia".
AGAIN LEMMIWINKS?

Wow. That's 4 decent debates that nobody honestly answered, revived by you. Maybe, just maybe one of these times we can sort out an issue without it being buried.

I get bored. :P
I have 13 [academic qualifications] actually. I'll leave it up to you to guess which, or simply call me a  liar. Either is fine.

Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur