I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge

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Chicken Fried Clucker

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10740 on: July 13, 2019, 10:39:49 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.

Quote from: wise
What happens if you deal with wise? You become retard.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10741 on: July 14, 2019, 02:42:04 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

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NotSoSkeptical

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10742 on: July 14, 2019, 05:06:29 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

Hmm.  If they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to a specific distance for geostationary orbit, then they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to the specific distance of the moon.

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10743 on: July 15, 2019, 05:30:35 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

Hmm.  If they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to a specific distance for geostationary orbit, then they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to the specific distance of the moon.
No! Getting into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator is completely different from going to the Moon. I explain a little at http://heiwaco.com/moontravelb.htm .

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Bullwinkle

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10744 on: July 15, 2019, 06:04:15 AM »
Lol, I can't believe this thread is still going.

Props to heiwa for having so many people with such a large erection for him.

Can you prove to these twerps that you are loaded heiwa?? It's easy, has it not been long enough of this game?


Heiwa is lord god king awesome.

So many marionettes held aloft simultaneously.
It's amazing.
RE can never win this argument.
FE can't be disproved.

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markjo

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10745 on: July 15, 2019, 06:16:49 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

Hmm.  If they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to a specific distance for geostationary orbit, then they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to the specific distance of the moon.
No! Getting into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator is completely different from going to the Moon.
What's different?  You need plenty of fuel to get to geostationary orbit.  You need to know where the rocket engine is pointed, how long to fire it, etc.  What's so different about going to the moon?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10746 on: July 15, 2019, 07:14:25 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

Hmm.  If they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to a specific distance for geostationary orbit, then they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to the specific distance of the moon.
No! Getting into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator is completely different from going to the Moon.
What's different?  You need plenty of fuel to get to geostationary orbit.  You need to know where the rocket engine is pointed, how long to fire it, etc.  What's so different about going to the moon?
You have to study http://heiwaco.com/moontravelb.htm .
To get into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator you have to provide certain potential and kinetic energy to the satellite using a rocket and, if all works well, it will arrive into and remain in the geostationary orbit for ever.
Going to the Moon is completely different. The Moon is a moving target orbiting Earth and, if you miss it, you'll return to Earth again in your elliptical orbit. But it Moon gravity gets hold of the satellite, the satellite will crash on the Moon.
There is no way the satellite can slow down and land on the Moon. Of course NASA science fiction writers invented another story in the 1960's but it was Fake News then and today.
Markjo, you really have to wake up and face the real world.

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markjo

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10747 on: July 15, 2019, 09:28:52 AM »
No, only one-way satellite launches into orbits around Earth are possible.
Then show me how you calculate how much fuel is required to send a satellite to geostationary orbit.
Hm, topic is to calculate fuel required to fly to the Moon, which was done 50+ years ago. See post #1.

Hmm.  If they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to a specific distance for geostationary orbit, then they/you can calculate the fuel needed to get an object of specific weight to the specific distance of the moon.
No! Getting into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator is completely different from going to the Moon.
What's different?  You need plenty of fuel to get to geostationary orbit.  You need to know where the rocket engine is pointed, how long to fire it, etc.  What's so different about going to the moon?
You have to study http://heiwaco.com/moontravelb.htm .
To get into geostationary orbit in space above Earth equator you have to provide certain potential and kinetic energy to the satellite using a rocket and, if all works well, it will arrive into and remain in the geostationary orbit for ever.
Except that geostationary orbits are not forever and do require station keeping to compensate for things like the gravitational influences of the sun and moon, solar wind, etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_station-keeping#Station-keeping_in_geostationary_orbit

 
Going to the Moon is completely different. The Moon is a moving target orbiting Earth and, if you miss it, you'll return to Earth again in your elliptical orbit. But it Moon gravity gets hold of the satellite, the satellite will crash on the Moon.
There is no way the satellite can slow down and land on the Moon. Of course NASA science fiction writers invented another story in the 1960's but it was Fake News then and today.
Carrying extra fuel to slow down and land is not fiction.  It's just one more thing to consider in your payload weight budget.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's 1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #10748 on: July 15, 2019, 09:51:01 AM »

Carrying extra fuel to slow down and land is not fiction.  It's just one more thing to consider in your payload weight budget.
Exactly! To win my Challenge (topic - post #1) you must consider these extra difficulties going to the Moon.