I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge

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Lemmiwinks

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1200 on: April 02, 2015, 12:28:48 PM »
If you took the time to look for yourself, you might actually find out - but you won't.
You'll blindly put up your challenge's synopsis for the 829384th time and throw some ad-hom in there and the cycle starts again.
You never listen. You nod with a blank stare then repeat what you've said over and over and over and over AND OVER AND OVER AND OVER like a broken record.

If you're too simple to be able to pull it apart and understand the simulator, just say so.

You unblocked him didn't you.
I have 13 [academic qualifications] actually. I'll leave it up to you to guess which, or simply call me a  liar. Either is fine.

Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur

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mikeman7918

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1201 on: April 02, 2015, 12:35:51 PM »
Hey Mikeman, don't forget that a simulator ... simulates.

There is a reason why simulations are used to test things like structures before they are actually built.

And do you know the definition of simulate?
"to assume or have the appearance or characteristics of".

And it definitely simulates the characteristics of space flight like realistic orbital mechanics.

Although, you can't prove the reality of a Moon flight, with something giving an appearance of flight.

I can however prove that it's possible given that the Earth is round, which is what the challenge is all about.

You have to prove it with your calculation. Don't be afraid, you can do it, Aldrins had used a slide rule to guide his ship!!!
http://historical.ha.com/itm/transportation/space-exploration/buzz-aldrin-s-apollo-11-slide-rule-flown-to-the-moon/a/669-25368.s

Nobody said that a slide rule was the only instrument used to do calculations on the space craft, they also used the on bored computer.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Arith

  • 351
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1202 on: April 02, 2015, 01:24:40 PM »
If you took the time to look for yourself, you might actually find out - but you won't.
You'll blindly put up your challenge's synopsis for the 829384th time and throw some ad-hom in there and the cycle starts again.
You never listen. You nod with a blank stare then repeat what you've said over and over and over and over AND OVER AND OVER AND OVER like a broken record.

If you're too simple to be able to pull it apart and understand the simulator, just say so.

You unblocked him didn't you.
Nuh Uh! I swear! I just don't have my browser save my junk so I see it all, get fired up, log in and then I don't see his posts. By then it's too late.

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mikeman7918

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1203 on: April 03, 2015, 12:49:38 AM »
There is not a lot of activity on this thread right now, so let's start discussing why Heiwa thinks I didn't win his challenge even though I provided a simulator which fulfilled all challenge requirements.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Heiwa

  • 7885
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1204 on: April 03, 2015, 03:58:23 AM »
There is not a lot of activity on this thread right now, so let's start discussing why Heiwa thinks I didn't win his challenge even though I provided a simulator which fulfilled all challenge requirements.

The simulator didn't produce the information required to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge. You could also just have copied/pasted the NASA info of its Apollo 11 trip available on the net but it does not produce the required information either. But no applications have been received as per rules, e.g. details!

Re the Apollo 11 trip I am still curious how the three persons on the space craft strapped themselves into their seats, when approaching the Moon straight from Earth at inceasing speed due to Moon gravity, and how they then decided what was up/down/right/left/forward/aft to know in what direction to fire the brake rocket engine except it was forward to slow down while they themselves were looking backwards. Had they then fired the rocket engine in any other direction, they would have missed the Moon and killed themselves. But no, they just slowed down while chatting with each other and suddenly they were orbiting the Moon. The course and speed had changed just like that. But how? You had to adjust the direction of brake force all the time while slowing down getting into orbit. What does your simulator say? Pls copy paste the details of your speed vector during braking. Also how much fuel was used? 

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Rama Set

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1205 on: April 03, 2015, 06:21:54 AM »
How many times have you ignored the answers to the navigation questions you have posed?
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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Lemmiwinks

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1206 on: April 03, 2015, 07:12:11 AM »
How many times have you ignored the answers to the navigation questions you have posed?

At this point in his life? All of them.
I have 13 [academic qualifications] actually. I'll leave it up to you to guess which, or simply call me a  liar. Either is fine.

Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1207 on: April 03, 2015, 07:41:21 AM »
There is not a lot of activity on this thread right now, so let's start discussing why Heiwa thinks I didn't win his challenge even though I provided a simulator which fulfilled all challenge requirements.

The simulator didn't produce the information required to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge. You could also just have copied/pasted the NASA info of its Apollo 11 trip available on the net but it does not produce the required information either. But no applications have been received as per rules, e.g. details!

Re the Apollo 11 trip I am still curious how the three persons on the space craft strapped themselves into their seats, when approaching the Moon straight from Earth at inceasing speed due to Moon gravity, and how they then decided what was up/down/right/left/forward/aft to know in what direction to fire the brake rocket engine except it was forward to slow down while they themselves were looking backwards. Had they then fired the rocket engine in any other direction, they would have missed the Moon and killed themselves. But no, they just slowed down while chatting with each other and suddenly they were orbiting the Moon. The course and speed had changed just like that. But how? You had to adjust the direction of brake force all the time while slowing down getting into orbit. What does your simulator say? Pls copy paste the details of your speed vector during braking. Also how much fuel was used?

First off the acceleration due to gravity at this point is very low and therefore the astronauts had no problems moving around an strapping themselves in.

Secondly, the burn required the engine come to be orientated in one specific direction to slow the spaceship down to reduce velocity to that which reduce produce a lunar orbit. The orientation can worked out by taking star positions from within the cabin. The burn length was calculated by the computers on Earth.

There are two elements to this situation. The Trans lunar injection burn transfers the craft from Earth low orbit to an earth orbit with an apogee that allows the craft to pass in front of the leading edge of the moon. At the point the engine is fired again to slow the craft again. This reduces velocity and drops it into lunar orbit.
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1208 on: April 03, 2015, 09:19:18 AM »
The Trans lunar injection burn transfers the craft from Earth low orbit to an earth orbit with an apogee that allows the craft to pass in front of the leading edge of the moon. At the point the engine is fired again to slow the craft again. This reduces velocity and drops it into lunar orbit.

It is this last brake manoeuvre I am interested in - to drop into lunar orbit. The spacecraft has left Earth in direction, where the leading edge of the moon will be at the encounter a couple of days later. The Moon orbits Earth at a speed of abt 1 000 m/s. The speed of the space craft after leaving Earth and arriving Moon varies considerably from say 11 000 m/s to get away from Earth and say 600 m/s at the point where Earth's and Moon's gravity has equal effect and 2 400 m/s when arriving at the leading edge of the Moon and then increasing fast as the Moon pulls you towards its centre. To get into a stable orbit around the Moon you have to slow down to 1 500 m/s at exactly the right time and direction. If you brake too much you will continue to descend and must land at once. If you brake too little you will miss the Moon altogether and spin off into space and maybe return to Earth after an orbit around the Sun two years later. You also have to stay in the right plane - not veer off. NASA says you need 11 000 kg of fuel which you burn during six minutes to drop inte lunar orbit. It seems the brake force is constant so the deceleration will increase during the braking. Average deceleration may be 2.5 m/s² so you better be strapped in your seat. Everything loose inside the space craft will fly against the forward end of the space craft.

To win the Challenge you have to describe the space craft speed vector during the brake time, e.g. every second.

Reason why you do not land at once on the Moon Tin Tin Belgian 1953 style, i.e. you decrease the speed from 2 500 m/s to 0 at touch down is that this manoeuvre requires much too much fuel, which you cannot take with you from Earth, etc, etc. You get too heavy

According my calculations you will always run out of fuel regardless how you plan your manned space trip and as there is no way to fill up in space any manned trip is impossible. You cannot win my Challenge. This NASA 1969 Moon trip fantasy where you drop off parts of your space craft as you go along and only returns in a capsule with a heat shield dropping into the ocean is just a silly joke.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 09:22:00 AM by Heiwa »

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1209 on: April 03, 2015, 09:56:49 AM »
The Trans lunar injection burn transfers the craft from Earth low orbit to an earth orbit with an apogee that allows the craft to pass in front of the leading edge of the moon. At the point the engine is fired again to slow the craft again. This reduces velocity and drops it into lunar orbit.

It is this last brake manoeuvre I am interested in - to drop into lunar orbit. The spacecraft has left Earth in direction, where the leading edge of the moon will be at the encounter a couple of days later. The Moon orbits Earth at a speed of abt 1 000 m/s. The speed of the space craft after leaving Earth and arriving Moon varies considerably from say 11 000 m/s to get away from Earth and say 600 m/s at the point where Earth's and Moon's gravity has equal effect and 2 400 m/s when arriving at the leading edge of the Moon and then increasing fast as the Moon pulls you towards its centre. To get into a stable orbit around the Moon you have to slow down to 1 500 m/s at exactly the right time and direction. If you brake too much you will continue to descend and must land at once. If you brake too little you will miss the Moon altogether and spin off into space and maybe return to Earth after an orbit around the Sun two years later. You also have to stay in the right plane - not veer off. NASA says you need 11 000 kg of fuel which you burn during six minutes to drop inte lunar orbit. It seems the brake force is constant so the deceleration will increase during the braking. Average deceleration may be 2.5 m/s² so you better be strapped in your seat. Everything loose inside the space craft will fly against the forward end of the space craft.

To win the Challenge you have to describe the space craft speed vector during the brake time, e.g. every second.
T
Reason why you do not land at once on the Moon Tin Tin Belgian 1953 style, i.e. you decrease the speed from 2 500 m/s to 0 at touch down is that this manoeuvre requires much too much fuel, which you cannot take with you from Earth, etc, etc. You get too heavy

According my calculations you will always run out of fuel regardless how you plan your manned space trip and as there is no way to fill up in space any manned trip is impossible. You cannot win my Challenge. This NASA 1969 Moon trip fantasy where you drop off parts of your space craft as you go along and only returns in a capsule with a heat shield dropping into the ocean is just a silly joke.

The velocity of the space craft would be described by an integral function with variables for initial velocity and mass and change in velocity and mass with time.

The window for lunar orbital burn has a reasonable margin of error as the orbit can be achieved with varying lengths of burn. However a good stable low orbit is what they are after and this is the aim.
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

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Rama Set

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1210 on: April 03, 2015, 10:25:01 AM »
Heiwa-You have been shown the math, fuel usage and burn times for the maneuver over at apollohoax.net. It was there that your profound ignorance of the rocket equation and navigation in space was demonstrated. It proved pretty conclusively that your challenges are a farce.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1211 on: April 03, 2015, 11:03:03 AM »

The velocity of the space craft would be described by an integral function with variables for initial velocity and mass and change in velocity and mass with time.

The window for lunar orbital burn has a reasonable margin of error as the orbit can be achieved with varying lengths of burn. However a good stable low orbit is what they are after and this is the aim.

In order to win my Challenge you must follow my rules. Windows of error are not allowed. Nobody can win my Challenge for obvious reasons - human space travel is impossible. It should be clear from start.

But many decent, nice, intelligent, law abiding people apparently belive otherwise. That's why I challenge them.

Unfortunately mostly brainless, paid shit responds. As expected.

I wonder when this thread will end. Any ideas?

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mikeman7918

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1212 on: April 03, 2015, 11:13:48 AM »
How a space craft navigates is it has devices which keep track of 3 points which I'm the case of Apolli were probobaly the Earth, the Moon, and star and because the motion of these objects is so easy to predict it triangulates it's position and to figure out it's velocity it simply figures out it's position twice and divides it's change in position by the amount of time between the two position checks.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1213 on: April 03, 2015, 11:42:10 AM »
How a space craft navigates is it has devices which keep track of 3 points which I'm the case of Apolli were probobaly the Earth, the Moon, and star and because the motion of these objects is so easy to predict it triangulates it's position and to figure out it's velocity it simply figures out it's position twice and divides it's change in position by the amount of time between the two position checks.

Yes, if you think so, describe it further in your application to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic). But do not forget the problem of fuel! Can you bring sufficient fuel along?
I am amazed that nobody from NASA, ESA or the Russian and Japanese space agencies have caught on to win my Challenge. Any ideas?

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1214 on: April 03, 2015, 12:38:26 PM »
Windows of error are allowed because they were a part of how space travel an orbital insertions work. The orbit can then be corrected by further burns.
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1215 on: April 03, 2015, 10:58:52 PM »
Windows of error are allowed because they were a part of how space travel an orbital insertions work. The orbit can then be corrected by further burns.
No windows of error are allowed in 3-D space navigation. If you, to brake, to slow down, want to change direction to drop into a Moon orbit, etc, fire your rocket engine at the wrong time and location, in the wrong direction with the wrong power and too short or long, you end up in the wrong location and do not drop into Moon orbit. You drop somewhere else = end of voyage.
To win my Challenge you really have to navigate 100%. It is difficult to say the least.

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mikeman7918

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1216 on: April 03, 2015, 11:40:18 PM »
No windows of error are allowed in 3-D space navigation. If you, to brake, to slow down, want to change direction to drop into a Moon orbit, etc, fire your rocket engine at the wrong time and location, in the wrong direction with the wrong power and too short or long, you end up in the wrong location and do not drop into Moon orbit. You drop somewhere else = end of voyage.
To win my Challenge you really have to navigate 100%. It is difficult to say the least.

No, you are wrong.  If you are off course then you can correct it later, although it wouldn't be quite as efficient as getting it right the first time.  The Apolli missions did 3 course corrections on the way to the Moon, a few in lunar orbit, many when the Lunar Module rendezvoused with the CSM, and 3 while returning to Earth.  Even in my first Apollo mission episode I showed you I had to do a course correction to avoid crashing into the Moon.

As for the fuel thing, the volume of the fuel is I relevent because in space all that matters is your mass and the mass of fuel is something simulated in Orbiter.  Specific impulse (ISP) is a measure of fuel/engine efficiency and it is how long it takes an engine to burn one pound of fuel while producing one pound of thrust.  This I information can be found directly in the Apollo mission mod config files.  Just to give you an idea of what to expect as far as realistic values, the bigger model rocket engines have an ISP of 160 seconD's while a Space Shuttle main engine has an ISP of 452.3 in a vacuum and 366 at sea level.  Engines are more efficient in a vacuum because the escaping gas doesn't have air pushing back on it so it can leave the engine faster.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1217 on: April 04, 2015, 11:17:02 AM »
Windows of error are allowed because they were a part of how space travel an orbital insertions work. The orbit can then be corrected by further burns.
No windows of error are allowed in 3-D space navigation. If you, to brake, to slow down, want to change direction to drop into a Moon orbit, etc, fire your rocket engine at the wrong time and location, in the wrong direction with the wrong power and too short or long, you end up in the wrong location and do not drop into Moon orbit. You drop somewhere else = end of voyage.
To win my Challenge you really have to navigate 100%. It is difficult to say the least.

I take it you don't know how the Apollo Trans lunar injections worked. The orbital mechanics of the Trans lunar injections were set so that even if no burn was used to enter lunar orbit, the Apollo spacecraft would swing behind the moon and return to Earth, this is called a free return trajectory.

The burn at the moon simply slows the craft down and enables lunar orbit.
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1218 on: April 04, 2015, 03:27:02 PM »
I am amazed that nobody from NASA, ESA or the Russian and Japanese space agencies have caught on to win my Challenge. Any ideas?

Partly because they don't know who you are.

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Misero

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1219 on: April 05, 2015, 06:47:55 AM »
I am amazed that nobody from NASA, ESA or the Russian and Japanese space agencies have caught on to win my Challenge. Any ideas?

Partly because they don't know who you are.
I am the worst moderator ever.

Sometimes I wonder: "Why am  I on this site?"
Then I look at threads about clouds not existing and I go back to posting and lurking. Lurk moar.

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Heiwa

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1220 on: April 05, 2015, 11:20:14 AM »
Windows of error are allowed because they were a part of how space travel an orbital insertions work. The orbit can then be corrected by further burns.
No windows of error are allowed in 3-D space navigation. If you, to brake, to slow down, want to change direction to drop into a Moon orbit, etc, fire your rocket engine at the wrong time and location, in the wrong direction with the wrong power and too short or long, you end up in the wrong location and do not drop into Moon orbit. You drop somewhere else = end of voyage.
To win my Challenge you really have to navigate 100%. It is difficult to say the least.

I take it you don't know how the Apollo Trans lunar injections worked. The orbital mechanics of the Trans lunar injections were set so that even if no burn was used to enter lunar orbit, the Apollo spacecraft would swing behind the moon and return to Earth, this is called a free return trajectory.

The burn at the moon simply slows the craft down and enables lunar orbit.
Exactly. In order to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic) to, e.g. land on the Moon you have to explain how you do it (a trans lunar injection) ... and that it is feasible.

Try also to explain the free return trajectory, i.e. your space ship approaches a moving planet/moon and swings around it without landing, crashing or stopping in orbit and then leaves the moving planet/moon, if it is part of your space trip. I can assure you a free return trajectory is just another NASA fantasy so far.

Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1221 on: April 05, 2015, 02:52:08 PM »
Windows of error are allowed because they were a part of how space travel an orbital insertions work. The orbit can then be corrected by further burns.
No windows of error are allowed in 3-D space navigation. If you, to brake, to slow down, want to change direction to drop into a Moon orbit, etc, fire your rocket engine at the wrong time and location, in the wrong direction with the wrong power and too short or long, you end up in the wrong location and do not drop into Moon orbit. You drop somewhere else = end of voyage.
To win my Challenge you really have to navigate 100%. It is difficult to say the least.

I take it you don't know how the Apollo Trans lunar injections worked. The orbital mechanics of the Trans lunar injections were set so that even if no burn was used to enter lunar orbit, the Apollo spacecraft would swing behind the moon and return to Earth, this is called a free return trajectory.

The burn at the moon simply slows the craft down and enables lunar orbit.
Exactly. In order to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic) to, e.g. land on the Moon you have to explain how you do it (a trans lunar injection) ... and that it is feasible.

Try also to explain the free return trajectory, i.e. your space ship approaches a moving planet/moon and swings around it without landing, crashing or stopping in orbit and then leaves the moving planet/moon, if it is part of your space trip. I can assure you a free return trajectory is just another NASA fantasy so far.

No, look it up yourself. I can't be arsed trying to explain this to you anymore.
Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by ignorance or stupidity.

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mikeman7918

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1222 on: April 05, 2015, 04:57:53 PM »
Exactly. In order to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic) to, e.g. land on the Moon you have to explain how you do it (a trans lunar injection) ... and that it is feasible.

It's definitely possible in Orbiter and Orbiter wasn't even created by NASA, it was created and is currently developed by Martin Schwager as a hobby and he doesn't even make any money off of it.  Is he in on the conspiracy too?

Try also to explain the free return trajectory, i.e. your space ship approaches a moving planet/moon and swings around it without landing, crashing or stopping in orbit and then leaves the moving planet/moon, if it is part of your space trip. I can assure you a free return trajectory is just another NASA fantasy so far.

A free return trajectory is basically a gravity assist which would put you on a course back to Earth if you were to go through with it.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Heiwa

  • 7885
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1223 on: April 05, 2015, 11:15:02 PM »
Exactly. In order to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic) to, e.g. land on the Moon you have to explain how you do it (a trans lunar injection) ... and that it is feasible.

It's definitely possible in Orbiter and Orbiter wasn't even created by NASA, it was created and is currently developed by Martin Schwager as a hobby and he doesn't even make any money off of it.  Is he in on the conspiracy too?

Try also to explain the free return trajectory, i.e. your space ship approaches a moving planet/moon and swings around it without landing, crashing or stopping in orbit and then leaves the moving planet/moon, if it is part of your space trip. I can assure you a free return trajectory is just another NASA fantasy so far.

A free return trajectory is basically a gravity assist which would put you on a course back to Earth if you were to go through with it.

I suggest you cooperate with Martin Schwager to win Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge (topic) still not collected by anyone. If a free return trajectory is included in your space trip plan, suggest you use it too. Just remember that your space craft must arrive at exactly the right time/location/altitude/direction above the Moon that is moving at 1 000 m/s speed relative Earth that is moving at 29 800 m/s speed relative the Sun (that is moving at high speed in the Milky Way). If you don't do, you will either miss the Moon or crash on the Moon or ... maybe drop into a Moon orbit?

If the latter happens you must also explain how to get out of Moon orbit at exactly the right time/location/altitude/direction so you can return to Earth.

When approaching Earth try to land safely to avoid doing a gravity assist kick!

What conspiracy are your talking about. Your bluff that you have Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge and/or that human space travel is possible?

If you intend to include photos of yourself on the Moon, ensure that the photos are real and not photo slopped together in a studio.



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mikeman7918

  • 5431
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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1224 on: April 07, 2015, 10:02:23 PM »
Heiwa, please drop the goal posts and keep them in one place.  Just come up with a list of things you want me to explain and don't add more things to it once I am done.  Once you have such a list I will hold you to it, so please get some integrity and play fair.
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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Heiwa

  • 7885
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1225 on: April 07, 2015, 11:50:33 PM »
Heiwa, please drop the goal posts and keep them in one place.  Just come up with a list of things you want me to explain and don't add more things to it once I am done.  Once you have such a list I will hold you to it, so please get some integrity and play fair.

I quote from the rules:

The Anders Bjφrkman Challenge 2 is first to calculate using first principles the amount of fuel (or energy) required to complete a manned Moon and/or planet Mars return trip after being ejected into space from Earth towards the Moon and/or planet Mars by external rockets, second to describe the space ship incl. its masses before/after the various manoeuvers of the trip, any heat shield(s), if fitted, the engines and fuel tanks that can carry the amount of fuel using 1960 or 2015 technology, the accommodation and gear for the persons aboard and finally/third to show that it is actually feasible to do the trip. Please do not present dreams and fantasies.

If you intend to use a heat shield to land, suggest you demonstrate that a 25-50 mm fiberglass honeycomb filled with resin on a thin titanium plate really works (and doesn't burn up after a short time).

Good luck!

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markjo

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Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

  • 7885
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1227 on: April 08, 2015, 12:24:53 PM »
Anders,
And here are 2 videos showing the testing of ablative materials.
#noexternalembed" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">Experimental Ablation Cooling
#ws" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">#ws

LOL. Do you suggest NASA tested the Apollo 11 heat shield like that 1968? The shield is supposed to ablate at speed starting at say 8000 m/s, etc.

This shield or what ever did not ablate being heated by a torch and vented by a little fan. What a JOKE!

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markjo

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Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1228 on: April 08, 2015, 01:00:22 PM »
Anders,
And here are 2 videos showing the testing of ablative materials.
#noexternalembed" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">Experimental Ablation Cooling
#ws" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">#ws

LOL. Do you suggest NASA tested the Apollo 11 heat shield like that 1968? The shield is supposed to ablate at speed starting at say 8000 m/s, etc.
I suppose that they tested various heat shield materials with previous missions, like Mercury and Gemini, along with ICBM tests.

This shield or what ever did not ablate being heated by a torch and vented by a little fan. What a JOKE!
If you're referring to the second video, then keep in mind that it was a first test, so I imagine that there is still some more research and development to be done by the students.  The first video (the one that didn't embed) shows several wind tunnel tests.

Also, what did you think of the papers that I linked?  Did you learn anything about how atmospheric reentry is planned?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Heiwa

  • 7885
Re: I won Heiwa's €1,000,000 challenge
« Reply #1229 on: April 09, 2015, 12:21:05 AM »
Did you learn anything about how atmospheric reentry is planned?

I use since many years the NASA info to explain why re-entries are not possible. See section 1.11 in  http://heiwaco.com/moontravel1.htm#EV17 .
« Last Edit: April 09, 2015, 12:45:32 AM by Heiwa »