Gravity Problem-Solved?

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Ringl3t

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Re: Gravity Problem-Solved?
« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2015, 10:50:09 PM »
If gravity can pull in light (black hole) why doesn't it fall from the roof to the ground?

The reason is because Earth's gravity pulls at 9.8 m/s2 and light goes 800,000,000 m/s, soms basic trigonometry would reveal that light does drop, but by an absolutely tiny amount.

300,000,000* lights a constant though, gravity should effect it regardless of speed, by that logic it would always be dark because light would whizz past us and away from us, look at a candle, the fire is pointing upwards, not being dragged down...

That's like saying that a bullet should drop to the ground imediately after it leaves the gun's barel because it's effected by gravity.  A bullet fired falls just as fast as a bullet dropped, however the fired bullet has already gone s long distance before it hits the ground.  In the time that it takes an object to fall a few feet from rest light can travel around Earth (assuming it's round) many times.  Basic trigenometry will tell you exactly how much the light will drop as it travels, try it.

Candle flames are not made of light, they are made of burning gasses that are so hot they emit light.  The reason that it rises is because the gas is low density due to the heat and it cools off and stops glowing shortly after being released.  The light emitted from the flame hits your eye making you see the glowing flame.  The flame is not made of light.

A bullet will still hit the ground. The flame still has a mass?
Must be the...

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Gravity Problem-Solved?
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2015, 11:13:24 PM »
A bullet fired falls just as fast as a bullet dropped, however the fired bullet has already gone s long distance before it hits the ground. 


Why are you repeating lies?  Don't you ever watch MythBusters?

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mikeman7918

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Re: Gravity Problem-Solved?
« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2015, 07:41:56 AM »
A bullet fired falls just as fast as a bullet dropped, however the fired bullet has already gone s long distance before it hits the ground. 


Why are you repeating lies?  Don't you ever watch MythBusters?

Mythbusters actually confirmed that one.
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mikeman7918

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Re: Gravity Problem-Solved?
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2015, 07:45:27 AM »
If gravity can pull in light (black hole) why doesn't it fall from the roof to the ground?

The reason is because Earth's gravity pulls at 9.8 m/s2 and light goes 800,000,000 m/s, soms basic trigonometry would reveal that light does drop, but by an absolutely tiny amount.

300,000,000* lights a constant though, gravity should effect it regardless of speed, by that logic it would always be dark because light would whizz past us and away from us, look at a candle, the fire is pointing upwards, not being dragged down...

That's like saying that a bullet should drop to the ground imediately after it leaves the gun's barel because it's effected by gravity.  A bullet fired falls just as fast as a bullet dropped, however the fired bullet has already gone s long distance before it hits the ground.  In the time that it takes an object to fall a few feet from rest light can travel around Earth (assuming it's round) many times.  Basic trigenometry will tell you exactly how much the light will drop as it travels, try it.

Candle flames are not made of light, they are made of burning gasses that are so hot they emit light.  The reason that it rises is because the gas is low density due to the heat and it cools off and stops glowing shortly after being released.  The light emitted from the flame hits your eye making you see the glowing flame.  The flame is not made of light.

A bullet will still hit the ground. The flame still has a mass?

Imagine you drop an object and measure how far it has fallen 0.001 seconds later, that's how far a beam of light will fall in the trip between a lightbulb in your house and your eye.  That's not very significant.  As for the flame having mass, a candle gets shorter as it burns, where do you think that mass goes?
I am having a video war with Jeranism.
See the thread about it here.

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macrohard

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Re: Gravity Problem-Solved?
« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2015, 02:03:02 PM »
If gravity can pull in light (black hole) why doesn't it fall from the roof to the ground?

The reason is because Earth's gravity pulls at 9.8 m/s2 and light goes 800,000,000 m/s, soms basic trigonometry would reveal that light does drop, but by an absolutely tiny amount.

300,000,000* lights a constant though, gravity should effect it regardless of speed, by that logic it would always be dark because light would whizz past us and away from us, look at a candle, the fire is pointing upwards, not being dragged down...

That's like saying that a bullet should drop to the ground imediately after it leaves the gun's barel because it's effected by gravity.  A bullet fired falls just as fast as a bullet dropped, however the fired bullet has already gone s long distance before it hits the ground.  In the time that it takes an object to fall a few feet from rest light can travel around Earth (assuming it's round) many times.  Basic trigenometry will tell you exactly how much the light will drop as it travels, try it.

Candle flames are not made of light, they are made of burning gasses that are so hot they emit light.  The reason that it rises is because the gas is low density due to the heat and it cools off and stops glowing shortly after being released.  The light emitted from the flame hits your eye making you see the glowing flame.  The flame is not made of light.

A bullet will still hit the ground. The flame still has a mass?

Imagine you drop an object and measure how far it has fallen 0.001 seconds later, that's how far a beam of light will fall in the trip between a lightbulb in your house and your eye.  That's not very significant.  As for the flame having mass, a candle gets shorter as it burns, where do you think that mass goes?

Try .00000001 seconds (over 10 feet).

Light would fall about .0000000055 inches over an entire mile.