Atmosohere and Gravity

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Atmosohere and Gravity
« on: November 05, 2014, 04:54:16 AM »
I have two questions.
Firstly, our atmosphere is a layer of air which basically keeps us alive. On a flat earth, what would the atmosohere look like? My guess would be that it looks like a dome... However, if the earth is accelatating upwards at a constant speed, the air would be forced down onto the earth and eventually disappear off the sides.
This brings me to my next question: When I drop an object, it falls to the ground because of gravity. However, with the flat earth theory, the object would remain suspended until the earth cought up. Again, with gravity, if I dropped a bowling ball and a feather at the same time, the ball would drop straight to the ground while the feather would 'meander its way down and eventually land next to the bowling ball. Alternatively, if the earth was actually flat and moving up at a speed of around 8 seconds, both the feather and the ball would get 'hit by the earth at the same time...'

Feel free to explain this :)

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2014, 05:57:06 AM »
For your first question, my theory is that as you move towards the edge, the temperature drops, and eventually it gets so cold that gases turn into liquids and precipitate back to the Earth and flow back toward the center.

For your second question, if the Earth is accelerating, then would it not be pushing air upwards?  This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things. 

Does this make sense? 

Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2014, 06:25:14 AM »
Does this make sense?
Not even close, but no worse than usual.

Especially this:

Quote
this would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things. 
???
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ausGeoff

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2014, 02:24:28 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.

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sandokhan

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2014, 05:04:05 AM »
I have two questions.
Firstly, our atmosphere is a layer of air which basically keeps us alive. On a flat earth, what would the atmosohere look like? My guess would be that it looks like a dome... However, if the earth is accelatating upwards at a constant speed, the air would be forced down onto the earth and eventually disappear off the sides.
This brings me to my next question: When I drop an object, it falls to the ground because of gravity. However, with the flat earth theory, the object would remain suspended until the earth cought up. Again, with gravity, if I dropped a bowling ball and a feather at the same time, the ball would drop straight to the ground while the feather would 'meander its way down and eventually land next to the bowling ball. Alternatively, if the earth was actually flat and moving up at a speed of around 8 seconds, both the feather and the ball would get 'hit by the earth at the same time...'

Feel free to explain this :)

Exactly.

The existence of a dome (and energy shield) would make the notion of an UA accelerator superfluous.

But the UAFE have practically taken over the FES, even though this hypothesis has been shown to be wrong multiple times.


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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2014, 06:16:44 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally. 

Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2014, 07:29:16 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally.
Then why does the brass ball hit the ground first?

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2014, 09:32:50 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally.
Then why does the brass ball hit the ground first?

Are you asking why a brass ball hits the ground before, say, a hollow ball, like a golf ball? 

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ausGeoff

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2014, 10:17:05 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally.
Then why does the brass ball hit the ground first?

Are you asking why a brass ball hits the ground before, say, a hollow ball, like a golf ball?

Uh... no.  He's obviously asking why the brass ball hits the ground before the polystyrene foam ball of the same dimensions.  Are you having some sort of problem interpreting simple questions jroa, or simply trying to derail the thread?


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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2014, 12:20:42 PM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally.
Then why does the brass ball hit the ground first?

Are you asking why a brass ball hits the ground before, say, a hollow ball, like a golf ball?

Uh... no.  He's obviously asking why the brass ball hits the ground before the polystyrene foam ball of the same dimensions.  Are you having some sort of problem interpreting simple questions jroa, or simply trying to derail the thread?



Who says that the brass ball would hit the ground first? 

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2014, 06:01:08 AM »
Another victory for the FES!

Just kidding.  Seriously, I would like to know what makes you think that the brass ball would hit the ground first.  Didn't Galileo prove this wrong hundreds of years ago? 

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ausGeoff

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2014, 06:06:30 AM »
Coincidentally, I found this article in my local paper today concerning Galileo's experiment with falling lightweight and heavy objects.  I apologise for posting the entire report, but I couldn't extract just the video link itself...

Brian Cox films Galileo's famous thought experiment from the Melbourne AGE newspaper 7 Nov 14.

And the great man himself...

A portrait of astronomer Galileo Galilei
by Dutch painter Justus Sustermans


« Last Edit: November 07, 2014, 09:38:52 AM by ausGeoff »

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2014, 06:14:10 AM »
So, then, you are admitting you were wrong when claiming that the heavier ball would fall faster.  We are making progress with you.  Keep up the learning.

Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2014, 07:08:20 AM »
So, then, you are admitting you were wrong when claiming that the heavier ball would fall faster.  We are making progress with you.  Keep up the learning.
He made no such claim.  This was the question:

Quote
Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?
Why don't you want to answer it?  Go on, have a go.  I dare you.
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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2014, 07:23:10 AM »
Except that you are forgetting this part. 

Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2014, 08:10:02 AM »
That experiment lacks something very important. Are we taking into account friction? Air? If there is vacuum.. both will hit floor at same time because of gravity.

If there is air friction while they fall, the brass ball would be less stopped than the little ball, that way, the bras ball will hit floor first relative to the smaller ball.

If I'm wrong, please correct me.

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2014, 08:21:14 AM »
I think that the surface of the ball would be the determining factor, all things considered.  Assuming they have the same surface, then both balls should hit the ground at the same time.  The air pushing up on them would be equal. 

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markjo

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2014, 09:00:10 AM »
I think that the surface of the ball would be the determining factor, all things considered.  Assuming they have the same surface, then both balls should hit the ground at the same time.  The air pushing up on them would be equal.
*sigh*  Physics 101 time, jroa.  When friction due to air resistance is considered, mass does become relevant.  As you should know, F=ma, where F is force, m is mass and a is acceleration due to gravity.  Since both balls are the same size, the more dense ball will have a greater mass and therefore a greater force to overcome friction due to air resistance.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2014, 09:04:29 AM by markjo »
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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2014, 09:02:47 AM »
I think that the surface of the ball would be the determining factor, all things considered.  Assuming they have the same surface, then both balls should hit the ground at the same time.  The air pushing up on them would be equal.
*sigh*  Physics 101 time, jroa.  When friction due to air resistance is considered, mass does become relevant.  As you should know, F=mg, where F is force, m is mass and g is acceleration due to gravity.  Since both balls are the same size, the more dense ball will have a greater mass and therefore a greater force to overcome friction due to air resistance.

Are you saying that Galileo lied? 

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ausGeoff

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2014, 09:43:11 AM »
Are you saying that Galileo lied?

Can you—for once—please try and add something constructive to this little debate jroa?  Who (apart from you) has even suggested Galileo "lied".

And can you also give the silly one-line rhetoric a miss for a while?  It's both tiresome and non-conducive to the flow of the thread.


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markjo

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #20 on: November 07, 2014, 12:38:53 PM »
I think that the surface of the ball would be the determining factor, all things considered.  Assuming they have the same surface, then both balls should hit the ground at the same time.  The air pushing up on them would be equal.
*sigh*  Physics 101 time, jroa.  When friction due to air resistance is considered, mass does become relevant.  As you should know, F=mg, where F is force, m is mass and g is acceleration due to gravity.  Since both balls are the same size, the more dense ball will have a greater mass and therefore a greater force to overcome friction due to air resistance.

Are you saying that Galileo lied?
No, I'm saying that Galileo used balls dense enough where friction due to air resistance wasn't relevant.  Polystyrene is not dense enough to overcome this friction as readily as brass can.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #21 on: November 07, 2014, 03:10:48 PM »
Except that you are forgetting this part. 

Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


Quote
Why don't you want to answer it?  Go on, have a go.  I dare you.
Looks like you wouldn't take my dare.  I'm double daring you this time.
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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2014, 12:56:11 AM »
Except that you are forgetting this part. 

Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


Quote
Why don't you want to answer it?  Go on, have a go.  I dare you.
Looks like you wouldn't take my dare.  I'm double daring you this time.

What question?  I thought that we established that balls fall at a given rate, no matter how much they weigh.  Didn't Galileo prove this hundreds of years ago? 

Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2014, 03:24:37 AM »
Except that you are forgetting this part. 

Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


Quote
Why don't you want to answer it?  Go on, have a go.  I dare you.
Looks like you wouldn't take my dare.  I'm double daring you this time.

What question? 

Sorry, 2 pages of must be very difficult to keep track of for a man in your condition.  Anyway it's this one:

Quote
Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?
I triple dare you this time...
« Last Edit: November 08, 2014, 05:31:12 AM by JimmyTheCrab »
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2014, 05:04:12 AM »
This would account for light things with a lot of surface area being affected more than heavier things.

Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?  Both have identical surface areas.  Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


If they have the same surface area and shape, then the air rushing up at the objects would affect them equally.
Then why does the brass ball hit the ground first?

Are you asking why a brass ball hits the ground before, say, a hollow ball, like a golf ball?

Uh... no.  He's obviously asking why the brass ball hits the ground before the polystyrene foam ball of the same dimensions.  Are you having some sort of problem interpreting simple questions jroa, or simply trying to derail the thread?



Who says that the brass ball would hit the ground first?
So altitude and density count for nothing?

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markjo

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2014, 08:44:13 AM »
Except that you are forgetting this part. 

Can you tell me why the brass ball hits the ground first.


Quote
Why don't you want to answer it?  Go on, have a go.  I dare you.
Looks like you wouldn't take my dare.  I'm double daring you this time.

What question? 

Sorry, 2 pages of must be very difficult to keep track of for a man in your condition.  Anyway it's this one:

Quote
Can you tell us which would reach the earth first when dropped from a 20-storey building jroa?  A 20cm ball of brass, or a 20cm ball of polystyrene foam?
I triple dare you this time...
I think that we can safely conclude that jroa is as incapable of providing a direct answer as sceptimtic is of providing a coherent one.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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ausGeoff

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2014, 07:42:33 PM »
I thought that we established that balls fall at a given rate, no matter how much they weigh.  Didn't Galileo prove this hundreds of years ago?

No; Galileo didn't prove that two balls of different mass (not weight BTW, mass and weight are two different things) fall at a "given" rate.  They didn't have vacuum chambers 400 years ago in order to discount friction.  At any rate, Galileo never actually carried out his alleged experiment from the Tower of Pisa—it was only a thought experiment.

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markjo

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Re: Atmosohere and Gravity
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2014, 09:20:20 PM »
I thought that we established that balls fall at a given rate, no matter how much they weigh.  Didn't Galileo prove this hundreds of years ago?
Apparently not:
In Dava Sobel's biographical book Galileo's Daughter she recounts that the balls did not land at the same time:

    The larger ball, being less susceptible to the effects of what Galileo recognized as air resistance, fell faster, to the great relief of the Pisan philosophy department. The fact that it fell only fractionally faster gave Galileo scant advantage.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.