A Question you can't answer

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A Question you can't answer
« on: October 17, 2014, 08:11:34 PM »
Hey guys, if the earth is so flat, then how do you explain mountains?

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2014, 08:26:20 PM »
Mountains can appear on both flat and round surfaces. I've lived in West Virginia my whole life, in fact I've never been out of the state expect once in kentucky. I've never been on land that wasn't mountainous.  The earth is flat, that doesn't mean it can't have mountains. Explain why you think mountains and a flat earth are mutually exclusive.

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The Ellimist

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2014, 08:28:02 PM »
Hey guys, if the earth is so flat, then how do you explain mountains?

This is actually really good. The existence of mountains poses a great many problems for the geology of FE, particularly the tectonic plates and UA
Additionally, we cannot entirely rule out the nefarious effects of demons, spirits, gnomes, and wizards on our society's ability to comprehend our flat earth as it really is. 

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2014, 08:29:08 PM »
because mountains go up. Up isn's flat

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guv

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2014, 08:34:50 PM »
Farting green turtles.

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The Ellimist

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2014, 08:37:55 PM »
Mountains can appear on both flat and round surfaces. I've lived in West Virginia my whole life, in fact I've never been out of the state expect once in kentucky. I've never been on land that wasn't mountainous.  The earth is flat, that doesn't mean it can't have mountains. Explain why you think mountains and a flat earth are mutually exclusive.
One thing that comes to mind is the magma that forms mountains and volcanoes. In RE, the magma is contained and kept liquid by pressure within the Earth. However in FE, maga should be exposed to space and solidify.
Additionally, we cannot entirely rule out the nefarious effects of demons, spirits, gnomes, and wizards on our society's ability to comprehend our flat earth as it really is. 

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The Ellimist

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2014, 08:39:20 PM »
because mountains go up. Up isn's flat
Also, magma is supposed to go "up" from beneath the Earth's surface. How is that possible with with UA?
Additionally, we cannot entirely rule out the nefarious effects of demons, spirits, gnomes, and wizards on our society's ability to comprehend our flat earth as it really is. 

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2014, 08:58:03 PM »
The mountains merely give off the illusion of increasing height. Due to the holographic nature of our universe, everything exists on a two dimensional plain, and thus everything is flat.

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2014, 09:09:18 PM »
Is a book a flat surface. Are the pages flat. What about pop up books? The pages are still flat.

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sceptimatic

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2014, 05:10:22 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?

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BJ1234

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2014, 06:45:55 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
My oven is mostly cubish.

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sceptimatic

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2014, 06:49:17 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
My oven is mostly cubish.
Yes, but flat inside where you rest your cooking wares, right?

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BJ1234

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2014, 07:33:27 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
My oven is mostly cubish.
Yes, but flat inside where you rest your cooking wares, right?
No, it is mostly a grating.
SOmething like this

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sceptimatic

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2014, 07:52:46 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
My oven is mostly cubish.
Yes, but flat inside where you rest your cooking wares, right?
No, it is mostly a grating.
SOmething like this

And does that grating slide into the oven nice and level, ready for flat trays and stuff to be placed on it?

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ausGeoff

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2014, 08:05:08 AM »




This is the sort of diagrammatic image of a volcano that that flat earthers will have a problem with.  How can they explain the mechanics of the molten, spherical outer core of the earth which consists largely of liquid iron, and which produces the earth's magnetic field as it rotates?  What does the core of their flat earth look like, and how are volcanoes formed on a flat earth?

—I await an explanatory flat earth diagram.



« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 05:24:11 PM by ausGeoff »

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ausGeoff

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2014, 08:11:46 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?


Trust our favourite science expert to really get the ball rolling with his very first comment.

A truly in-depth, relevant, self-explanatory, insightful, detailed and incisive answer to the OP's question.

In one simple sentence, sceptimatic's managed to describe the geophysics of the formation of mountains and volcanoes in such a way that even a 3-year-old could grasp.

Well done—again—sceptimatic.  10/10.    ;D



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BJ1234

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2014, 08:24:46 AM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
My oven is mostly cubish.
Yes, but flat inside where you rest your cooking wares, right?
No, it is mostly a grating.
SOmething like this

And does that grating slide into the oven nice and level, ready for flat trays and stuff to be placed on it?
Yes, but what does the levelness, not the flatness, of my oven have to do with the shape of the earth?

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2014, 08:39:34 AM »
You can get pizza ovens  - still not quite flat though.
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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2014, 06:51:58 PM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?

no because if my oven was flat then i couldn't fit bread in it, there'd be no room

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Son of Orospu

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2014, 07:31:37 PM »
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?


Trust our favourite science expert to really get the ball rolling with his very first comment.

A truly in-depth, relevant, self-explanatory, insightful, detailed and incisive answer to the OP's question.

In one simple sentence, sceptimatic's managed to describe the geophysics of the formation of mountains and volcanoes in such a way that even a 3-year-old could grasp.

Well done—again—sceptimatic.  10/10.    ;D




This section is for flat Earth questions and answers, not your commentaries.  Please keep them to yourself or post in the appropriate board.  Thanks. 

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ausGeoff

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2014, 05:49:20 PM »
This section is for flat Earth questions and answers, not your commentaries.  Please keep them to yourself or post in the appropriate board.  Thanks.


Tell me jora... is there any particular reason you've chosen me as your "whipping boy" of the moment—other than I'm one of the several round earthers who posts in-depth questions which invariably stump you and your round flat earth peers?  You seem to spend a lot of your time following me around, and slapping my wrists at every opportunity LOL.

I note too that you never queried sceptimatic's silly off-topic post about the bread in the oven, or any of the ensuing comments about oven racks and pizza ovens.

Bemusingly, in your haste to berate me, you failed to notice that I was actually asking for a flat earther to address a question.....

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—I await an explanatory flat earth diagram.

So jroa... would you care to respond to my question relating to the formation of mountains—in response to the OP's original query about their appearance on the earth's surface?
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 04:10:05 PM by ausGeoff »

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sandokhan

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2014, 06:04:34 AM »
Actually, mountain building can't be explained AT ALL on the RE.

"Not long ago in a geological sense, the flat plain from New Jersey to Florida was under the sea.
At that time the ocean surf broke directly on the Old Appalachian Mountains. Previously the
southeastern part of the mountain structure had sunk below the sea and become covered with a
layer of sand and mud, thickening seaward. The wedgelike mass of marine sediments was then
uplifted and cut into by rivers, giving the Atlantic coastal plain of the United States. Why was it
uplifted? To the westward are the Appalachians. The geologist tells us of the stressful times
when a belt of rocks extending from Alabama to Newfoundland was jammed, thrust together, to
make this mountain system. Why? How was it done? In former times the sea flooded the region
of the great plains from Mexico to Alaska, and then withdrew. Why this change?"
The birth of the Cordilleras—"again the mystery of mountain-making clamors for solution."
And so on all over the world. The Himalayas were under the sea. Now Eurasia is three miles or
more above the bottom of the Pacific. Why?


The problem of mountain-making is a vexing one: many of them [mountains] are composed of
tangentially compressed and over-thrust rocks that indicate scores of miles of circumferential
shortening in the Earth's crust. Radial shrinkage is woefully inadequate to cause the observed
amount of horizontal compression.

Even authors of textbooks confess their ignorance. "Why have sea floors of remote periods
become the lofty highlands of today? What generates the enormous forces that bend, break, and
mash the rocks in mountain zones? These questions still await satisfactory answers."

(from Worlds in Collision)


Here is book dedicated entirely to the mountain building mysteries of the earth:

http://www.truthseekersministries.org/files/Velikovsky-Earth-in-Upheaval.pdf

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Son of Orospu

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2014, 06:13:33 AM »
ausGeoff, because you like to give your round Earth opinions in a board that is devoted to flat Earth questions and answers.  Nobody really cares about your opinions.  You  constantly tell us what you think of this poster or that one, what you think of the forums, et al.  We honestly don't care about your opinions about anything.  Once again, in case you did not realise this before, this board is for asking questions and receiving answers about the Flat Earth, not for you to summarizer whatever thoughts you might have bouncing around in your head.

Oh, and sceptimatic did give a FE answer.  Just because you did not like his answer, that does not mean it was not a FE answer. 

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2014, 07:43:13 AM »
Oh, and sceptimatic did give a FE answer. 
Did he?  I can't see one - what was his answer?

as

Quote
Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?
Is not an answer, it's a question (see the little "?" symbol at the end)
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2014, 03:12:48 PM »
Nobody really cares about your opinions.
You don't really think anyone here cares about these mr. moderator posts of yours?  ::) If offtopic posts bother you so just remove them and ban the user.

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ausGeoff

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2014, 04:29:17 PM »
If offtopic posts bother you so just remove them and ban the user.
jroa couldn't do that.  Or if he did, then there'd be no flat earthers left on their own forum.    ;D

A few flat earthers here post more off-topic drivel than all the round earthers combined.

For example?  sceptimatic's first contribution to this thread in response to a question about the formation of mountains:  "Have you ever seen a loaf of bread rise in a flat oven?"  According to jroa, this response was a legitimate "FE answer".  Which helps explain why the flat earthers know so little about geophysics.

Why didn't sceptimatic suggest the collision of tectonic plates for example? 





But... oh no.  We had to make do with a loaf of bloody bread as an example.  No fun in posting a credible answer is there?




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sceptimatic

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2014, 09:33:40 AM »




This is the sort of diagrammatic image of a volcano that that flat earthers will have a problem with.  How can they explain the mechanics of the molten, spherical outer core of the earth which consists largely of liquid iron, and which produces the earth's magnetic field as it rotates?  What does the core of their flat earth look like, and how are volcanoes formed on a flat earth?

—I await an explanatory flat earth diagram.
Did you know that the deepest they can drill is 7miles?
So tell me, Geoffrey, how did they manage to find out about all of this inner Earth stuff?

Let me hazard a guess. They made it all up, right?
« Last Edit: October 29, 2014, 09:36:42 AM by sceptimatic »

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The Ellimist

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2014, 02:34:47 PM »




This is the sort of diagrammatic image of a volcano that that flat earthers will have a problem with.  How can they explain the mechanics of the molten, spherical outer core of the earth which consists largely of liquid iron, and which produces the earth's magnetic field as it rotates?  What does the core of their flat earth look like, and how are volcanoes formed on a flat earth?

—I await an explanatory flat earth diagram.
Did you know that the deepest they can drill is 7miles?
So tell me, Geoffrey, how did they manage to find out about all of this inner Earth stuff?

Let me hazard a guess. They made it all up, right?
You're a horrible guesser. The short answer is physics and volcanoes.
Additionally, we cannot entirely rule out the nefarious effects of demons, spirits, gnomes, and wizards on our society's ability to comprehend our flat earth as it really is. 

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ausGeoff

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2014, 09:03:54 PM »
Did you know that the deepest they can drill is 7miles?
Um..... is this intended as a serious response sceptimatic?  Or do you really believe that we'd drill a hole to the earth's core even if we did have the available technology?  Just how gullible are you LOL?

Quote
So tell me, Geoffrey, how did they manage to find out about all of this inner Earth stuff?
Sorry sceptimatic, but you should have perceived by now I'm not here to do your homework for you.  How about—for a refreshing change—you do some of it yourself?

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BJ1234

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Re: A Question you can't answer
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2014, 11:18:56 PM »
  Or do you really believe that we'd drill a hole to the earth's core even if we did have the available technology?

I do believe that if we had the available technologies by, we would drill to the center of the earth.  I mean we sent men to the moon and are working on sending men to mars.  Mankind is very inquisitive and if given the technology, seems to utilize said technology.