Antarctica questions

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BJ1234

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #120 on: October 09, 2014, 09:52:19 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #121 on: October 09, 2014, 10:03:20 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #122 on: October 09, 2014, 10:09:10 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?
You are saying the person that took you to that place was lying.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #123 on: October 09, 2014, 10:19:02 AM »
You are saying the person that took you to that place was lying.
If I thought that I would say it, but no, I'm not.
If 10,000 people went with me I would accept that they all thought we were going over and under a globe. I mean, why shouldn't they if they are not questioning it?

What I'm saying is, people can harp on as much as they want and they wouldn't have a clue that they were travelling to Antarctica "under a globe"...they would simply assume that, because that's what they were told.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #124 on: October 09, 2014, 10:21:39 AM »
You are saying the person that took you to that place was lying.
If I thought that I would say it, but no, I'm not.
If 10,000 people went with me I would accept that they all thought we were going over and under a globe. I mean, why shouldn't they if they are not questioning it?

What I'm saying is, people can harp on as much as they want and they wouldn't have a clue that they were travelling to Antarctica "under a globe"...they would simply assume that, because that's what they were told.
Despite all the knowledge and training for navigation being based on a round earth.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #125 on: October 09, 2014, 10:23:30 AM »
inquisitive, this is not a debate forum.  If you don't have a flat Earth question or answer, please refrain from posting.  Thanks. 

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #126 on: October 09, 2014, 10:27:13 AM »
inquisitive, this is not a debate forum.  If you don't have a flat Earth question or answer, please refrain from posting.  Thanks.
Where can I find proven distances between major cities that are consistent with a flat earth?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #127 on: October 09, 2014, 10:29:54 AM »
inquisitive, this is not a debate forum.  If you don't have a flat Earth question or answer, please refrain from posting.  Thanks.
Where can I find proven distances between major cities that are consistent with a flat earth?

Do I look like a road guide?  Maybe you could try google for yourself for a change? 

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #128 on: October 09, 2014, 10:41:18 AM »
inquisitive, this is not a debate forum.  If you don't have a flat Earth question or answer, please refrain from posting.  Thanks.
Where can I find proven distances between major cities that are consistent with a flat earth?

Do I look like a road guide?  Maybe you could try google for yourself for a change?
For ones that prove a flat earth?  All distances are consistent with a round earth, eg. Cape Town to Perth.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #129 on: October 09, 2014, 10:50:39 AM »
This is not a debate forum, inquisitive.  Please post in the appropriate forum.  Thanks. 

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #130 on: October 09, 2014, 11:06:34 AM »
This is not a debate forum, inquisitive.  Please post in the appropriate forum.  Thanks.
I asked a question about distances and look forward to the answer.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #131 on: October 09, 2014, 11:07:19 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

When you start thinking before you type maybe?
Did you not say that you knew where you were after getting off a bus because there was a sign telling you?  How is that different if there was a sign telling you in Antarctica?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #132 on: October 09, 2014, 11:25:41 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

When you start thinking before you type maybe?
Did you not say that you knew where you were after getting off a bus because there was a sign telling you?  How is that different if there was a sign telling you in Antarctica?
Because I'm not questioning what a place is called, I'm questioning where that place actually is.

I'll tell you what. I'll stick you on a plane and send you to Antarctica from where you live. You tell me how you will know for sure that you are going under a globe, based on simply travelling as an observer of leisure.



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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #133 on: October 09, 2014, 11:45:51 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

When you start thinking before you type maybe?
Did you not say that you knew where you were after getting off a bus because there was a sign telling you?  How is that different if there was a sign telling you in Antarctica?
Because I'm not questioning what a place is called, I'm questioning where that place actually is.

I'll tell you what. I'll stick you on a plane and send you to Antarctica from where you live. You tell me how you will know for sure that you are going under a globe, based on simply travelling as an observer of leisure.
But why would you believe a sign saying what a place is called but not a sign telling you where a place is at?

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #134 on: October 09, 2014, 11:51:25 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

When you start thinking before you type maybe?
Did you not say that you knew where you were after getting off a bus because there was a sign telling you?  How is that different if there was a sign telling you in Antarctica?
Because I'm not questioning what a place is called, I'm questioning where that place actually is.

I'll tell you what. I'll stick you on a plane and send you to Antarctica from where you live. You tell me how you will know for sure that you are going under a globe, based on simply travelling as an observer of leisure.
GPS will tell me my location.

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markjo

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #135 on: October 09, 2014, 11:56:33 AM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
And I'm asking why you would think that you were anywhere but where they told you that you were?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #136 on: October 09, 2014, 12:46:26 PM »
Scepti, if someone tells you that they're sending you to Antarctica to do some research and everything that you see and experience is consistent with what Antarctica is supposed to be like, then why should you think that you were anywhere but Antarctica?
I have no problem with being told I went to a place called Antarctica. I'm questioning where I actually went to, on the Earth. This is what I'm saying.
Do you have the same problem when you go on a bus?
No, because I know exactly where I'm going on a bus. Why? Because it's sign posted if it's over distance or by knowing where I'm at if it's more local.

Is this the best you can do?

So you believe what you are told if it is written on a sign?  So if a sign was posted saying "You are here" with a big arrow on a globe pointing to Antarctica, you would believe that the world is a globe and that you were in Antarctica?
How long is it going to take you people to actually think about what I've said?

When you start thinking before you type maybe?
Did you not say that you knew where you were after getting off a bus because there was a sign telling you?  How is that different if there was a sign telling you in Antarctica?
Because I'm not questioning what a place is called, I'm questioning where that place actually is.

I'll tell you what. I'll stick you on a plane and send you to Antarctica from where you live. You tell me how you will know for sure that you are going under a globe, based on simply travelling as an observer of leisure.

BJ - TAKE HIM UP ON IT!  It sounds like it would be a great trip! And easy enough to tell where you are on the globe, to meet the conditions of passage.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #137 on: October 09, 2014, 01:10:11 PM »
I think you said you arrived in February. Was the Sun up 24 hours a day in the earliest parts of your visit, or was it twilight for part of the time then? If it was 24-hr sunlight, do you know approximately the date the Sun first touched or went below the horizon?
It's sketchy but from my memory it appeared like it was day, forever. I can't recall how long it lasted but it was a while. Remember I'm trying a recall here and I also didn't exactly document the sun or anything as that wasn't my goal.
You were on a coastline, I think (is that what "land edge" means here?) Were there mountains, or was the dry or ice-covered land generally flat, or somewhere between? By "mountains", I mean Alpine Peaks - high, jagged ones.
Sort of, yes - in the distance.
Did you arrive by ship, air, or overland? I asked this a couple days ago and got little more in response than a lecture about how I should not ridicule you.
Air, then ship, then helicopter.

The sun traveling a tilted circle in the sky, lowest directly south until it ducks below the horizon doesn't suggest exactly that? OK. For you maybe. For me it absolutely does, which is why I resent the second-person pronoun in your quote.
Nope - it didn't suggest anything like a rotating globe, at all.


This quote wasn't addressed to me and doesn't apply since I was in Antarctica in the early part of the year, but how this relates to anyone "having a brain" is not clear. What was that you were requesting about ridicule?
Correct, it wasn't addressed to you and if you look at who I quoted you will see I was simply returning the favour, one which I would gladly return to you if you decide to be clever.
In future just respond to me with what's on your mind. No need to stick up for others, I'm quite sure they can all manage that themselves.

"Air, then ship, then helicopter."

Thanks. Where did you board the ship (country and city, or, if already in Antarctica, which base)? Where did you board the flight that got you there? How long was the flight? What kind of ship (icebreaker, trawler, container ship, etc.)? How long did it take to travel aboard this ship to where you boarded the helicopter (weeks, days, hours if you don't have anything more accurate)? Were you always (or mostly) in sight of land? How long did you fly by helicopter? What kind of helicopter (piston, turbojet, etc.)?

These things can tell you a lot about how and where you're traveling if you pay attention.

"In future just respond to me with what's on your mind."

In the future, please don't tell me what to post and what not to post. Thanks!
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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sokarul

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #138 on: October 09, 2014, 02:47:49 PM »
No it doesn't. When I was there in the early part of the year it was daylight at midnight. How about you getting a brain because it's clear you haven't been there.
You would have been at around 75 degrees or more south. No too many places you could have been. Then yes you could have 24 hour sun when you got there and by the time you left you would be in 24 hour darkness. Didn't feel the need to point that out?
ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

It's no slur if it's fact.

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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #139 on: October 10, 2014, 06:03:06 AM »
Guys..... as sceptimatic has again managed to take this thread way off topic, I think it's time to ignore any further comments he posts.  His primary aim is to make all these threads about him and his opinions—bizarre as they are LOL.

Let's try and get back on topic.

So... The OP, sockless74, posted "Now all that [about Antarctica] being said, I of course haven't been to Antarctica or sailed around it and I don't know anyone who has. So all the stories and photos online could be fake, conspiracy, etc etc... But this is one of the main areas that I am stuck on in accepting the flat Earth model and so far no one has explained it well enough that I am convinced.

sceptimatic shortly thereafter said "I was there [Antarctica] as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice".

Maybe the flat earthers should be attempting to address the OP's questions, rather than letting sceptimatic waffle on with his usual absurd, incoherent pseudo-scientific drivel?

Namely, sailing around Antarctica from the Australian side and being on the South American side; taking a compass with you to verify that you're really at the southernmost point on the earth; not noticing that the coastline of Antarctica is so much shorter than predicted by FE theory (11,000 miles versus 78,000 miles); how is it that you can take a tourist  excursion to the South Pole with numerous companies; why are there are no former ice wall "guards" or currently serving guards talking about there experiences;  no soldiers talking about it in their military experience;  no actual proof of any sort for  an ice wall that is 150 feet high.

—And we all know that sceptimatic has never been to Antarctica, so we can safely ignore any future bullshit from that source LOL.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #140 on: October 10, 2014, 11:24:05 AM »
You are saying the person that took you to that place was lying.
If I thought that I would say it, but no, I'm not.
If 10,000 people went with me I would accept that they all thought we were going over and under a globe. I mean, why shouldn't they if they are not questioning it?

What I'm saying is, people can harp on as much as they want and they wouldn't have a clue that they were travelling to Antarctica "under a globe"...they would simply assume that, because that's what they were told.
I'm curious here Scepti, if the globe has gravity which holds people against the surface, which results in a person at any one place on that globe being 'right side up', then how does one expect to feel like they're 'under' that globe?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #141 on: October 10, 2014, 01:01:42 PM »
You are saying the person that took you to that place was lying.
If I thought that I would say it, but no, I'm not.
If 10,000 people went with me I would accept that they all thought we were going over and under a globe. I mean, why shouldn't they if they are not questioning it?

What I'm saying is, people can harp on as much as they want and they wouldn't have a clue that they were travelling to Antarctica "under a globe"...they would simply assume that, because that's what they were told.
I'm curious here Scepti, if the globe has gravity which holds people against the surface, which results in a person at any one place on that globe being 'right side up', then how does one expect to feel like they're 'under' that globe?
I don't think a globe has gravity, I don't subscribe at all to a globe, or gravity, as you well know but here's something for you.
Why do they say Australia is down under?

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markjo

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #142 on: October 10, 2014, 01:14:43 PM »
I'm curious here Scepti, if the globe has gravity which holds people against the surface, which results in a person at any one place on that globe being 'right side up', then how does one expect to feel like they're 'under' that globe?
I don't think a globe has gravity, I don't subscribe at all to a globe, or gravity...
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #143 on: October 10, 2014, 01:17:36 PM »
I'm curious here Scepti, if the globe has gravity which holds people against the surface, which results in a person at any one place on that globe being 'right side up', then how does one expect to feel like they're 'under' that globe?
I don't think a globe has gravity, I don't subscribe at all to a globe, or gravity...
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.

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Rama Set

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #144 on: October 10, 2014, 02:05:51 PM »
You are just resorting to petty pedantry now?  How sad. In regards to the nickname "Doen Under", it is a metaphor that makes sense if you are looking at a globe, not if you are actually inhabiting the space. But you know that, you are just pretending you are the Pied Piper.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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markjo

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #145 on: October 10, 2014, 07:01:28 PM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

sceptimatic

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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #146 on: October 11, 2014, 02:29:58 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #147 on: October 11, 2014, 05:41:12 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
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Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #148 on: October 11, 2014, 06:26:32 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #149 on: October 11, 2014, 06:28:41 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?