Antarctica questions

  • 171 Replies
  • 45244 Views
?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #60 on: October 07, 2014, 06:45:37 AM »
What's the value in deciding something if it's wrong?

The Universe doesn't care what you (or I, or anyone else) think. You can think and wish with all your might that something should or will to happen, it won't have any effect on whether it happens or not. You can, however, try to understand what has happened in the past, what is happening now, and use what has been learned to make predictions about what will happen in the future. The value of this is how well the predictions work.
There is no universe, it's in your mind. It's tehre because you are brainwashed to believe it's there because you only have your eyes as witness to what you are told is there.
The chances are that most people iniside Earth think like this, with very few actually knowing the real truth of it ALL, if they actually do know the truth of it all.
Not even I know the truth of it all but one thing I do know. We are not being told the entire truth or maybe even a quarter of it, yet this is why debates and questions are asked.
You can tell me anything till you're blue in the face but you are only using what you have been trained to use by process of brainwashing. This isn't a dig, because we are all brainwashed. It's just the severity of it which separates people.


Where are the logical flaws in mainstream models for life, the Universe, and everything? Note: your simply not liking or not believing them - for whatever reason - is not a logical flaw.
I won't go into it as it's been done before and this is a question and answer forum. All I will say is, gravity is a flaw which I've also explained in depth but won't explain in here.
There's may flaws, they are just rejected as being flaws because people have been taught to accept fantasy science.
They're mainstream not because some evil cabal is forcing them down our unwitting throats; they're mainstream because they explain what we see, and predict what hasn't happened yet very well.
Of course they explain what we see. We can be made to believe anything we see if we can't physically prove otherwise. Space being one prime example.
So where, specifically, is a flaw in the heliocentric spheroidal-earth model? Pick any one you think you see. How does your model explain it better? What predictions can your model make that will be different than the mainstream model? Predictions that can only be tested in the distant future aren't particularly useful in discussions such as these.
I'll pick one simple spherical flaw which, again, will be denied, naturally by using fantasy, but again, I will not discuss it in Q&A as this forum is too techy as to what constitutes what.
Anyway, oceans staying on Earth is a simple one.


This is an advantage? "Given out as an official model", even if true, doesn't necessarily mean something is wrong. See earlier comments about why mainstream is mainstream and useful predictions.
Nobody is saying ALL mainstream science is wrong but much of it requires serious questioning, which is what I'm doing.
"Merely a thought process" devoid of actual observations and checks against reality is usually described as "arm waving", or, in some cases, "raving". It can be amusing to dream up, and to poke holes in, but has limited usefulness otherwise.
Of course I'm arm waving. I'm not armed with the tools to set anything out as anything but. To make something believable you have to have backing of people that are capable of selling it to the masses. It's still arm waving for them but it's not seen as that because it becomes a national or worldwide truth.
Since I asked you for an example of a flaw in the mainstream model, I'll describe what I see as a major shortcoming in yours:

Someone is in, say, New Orleans, Louisiana (approx. Lat 30 N, Lon 90 W) and watching the Sun as it moves across the sky on a summer afternoon until it sets to his west. You suggest what he sees as "the Sun" is actually a reflection of a big bright thing fixed at the center of a disk-like earth that doesn't move. The reflection is coming from a fixed dome that covers the entire earth-disk and holds in the "atmosphere". A similar observer in Jacksonville, Florida (approx. 30 N, 82 W) will have seen the Sun move similarly and set about a half-hour earlier.  If nothing is moving, how and why does the reflection move from east to west? How and why does it "set"? When it's setting in Jacksonville, how and why is it still higher in the sky in New Orleans?
I never said the central sun was static. You'll need to read up a bit more on what I have said. I won't explain it here.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #61 on: October 07, 2014, 06:55:10 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #62 on: October 07, 2014, 07:15:47 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #63 on: October 07, 2014, 08:39:41 AM »
I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.

Can you think of some simple observations that would distinguish between the Arctic and Antarctic regions of a spherical earth?
Nope. You see, if you haven't been all around the inner circle, once part can differ from another. You could be on one side, then sail around to the other and bear in mind it would be a fantastic circular distance to the other side of it, you could almost believe you had went over a globe to the south pole if you were naive.
In the spirit of the "think for yourselves" mantra often voiced here, I'd like to see if any flat-earth proponents can present at least one practical (and easy!) way to tell if someone were trying fool them by taking them to the Arctic and telling them it's the Antarctic. Believe it or not, it really is easy to tell one from the other!
It's only easy if you know what you're looking at when you're travelling from one side to another and because you are merely a dot on the circle, I doubt you would know anything at all.

You might be cocooned, but by no means is everyone. If you are, unless you're a complete invalid or involuntarily confined for some reason, its your own fault, so stop navel-gazing and whining about how everything we're told is a lie (everything, that is, except "everything we're told is a lie"), and do something!
In your home you're cocooned. In the street, you're cocooned in the street. Ina car driving you are cocooned and see only what's around your limited vision. In a plane is the same. On a boat is the same. Basically unless you go into your space and look over a globe, seeing north and south poles, you're cocooned. Now since space does not exist and is therefore impossible to be in, you are cocooned. No disability required.
Travel to Antarctica if you can afford it; it's expensive (but not hideously expensive), but can be done, and little there is "out of bounds" other than for logistical difficulties (which are significant).  Better yet, if you have a useful skill, get a job with a contractor or government agency that maintains and operates the facilities there and stay for a year or longer; they need tradesmen, professionals, and labor of all kinds as well as scientists and engineers.
Same thing applies to my earlier post.

 
If that's not practical (it's certainly not easy), go out and watch the stars.  Especially watch the stars for a few hours as they appear to circle the pole - that's easy and cheap.
From one side, that would be fine. Go around it and your perception has changed to the so called stars you see from that point.A full change of perspective.

  If you can, travel to the opposite hemisphere and watch a different set of stars circle the other pole - in the opposite direction. 
You can do that around the centre. You're getting mixed up with thinking that you could see the same thing from one side of the north pole to the other which your eyes would not allow, even with optics.

Or just sit around and complain how "they're trying to trick all of us." Boo-hoo. It's much easier.
I'm not complaining. There's nothing I can do about it. As long as I know I'm not being duped then I'm fine.

If you think about it, all we have here is the "we're told" whining again.  Your "what if" makes little sense, but should be easy enough to observe, if true. So go check it out for yourself. 
Like I said earlier.
[Edit] Fixed nested quotes. Removed gratuitous snarky comment.
Entirely up to you what comments you put in. They're all the same to me.  ;D

QFT.  It's not that we don't trust you, but...
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #64 on: October 07, 2014, 08:43:19 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You said you were there and gave a specific length of time. This was followed on the same line by the statement that you couldn't tell where you were. Why did you make the first statement if it wasn't what you meant? This doesn't look like a typing error; since you're retracting it now it must have been an intentional fabrication all along.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #65 on: October 07, 2014, 08:57:51 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You said you were there and gave a specific length of time. This was followed on the same line by the statement that you couldn't tell where you were. Why did you make the first statement if it wasn't what you meant? This doesn't look like a typing error; since you're retracting it now it must have been an intentional fabrication all along.
Take it however you want to and think what you please. None of it has any bearing on my thoughts about what I said.




Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #66 on: October 07, 2014, 09:05:47 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You're the one twisting.  You said you were in Antarctica for 6 months.

Now you are saying you have no idea where you were for 6 months?  Are you sure this wasn't a dream?
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #67 on: October 07, 2014, 09:39:02 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You're the one twisting.  You said you were in Antarctica for 6 months.

Now you are saying you have no idea where you were for 6 months?  Are you sure this wasn't a dream?
I said I had no idea where I was in the first place, can't you absorb that?

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #68 on: October 07, 2014, 09:45:45 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You said you were there and gave a specific length of time. This was followed on the same line by the statement that you couldn't tell where you were. Why did you make the first statement if it wasn't what you meant? This doesn't look like a typing error; since you're retracting it now it must have been an intentional fabrication all along.
Take it however you want to and think what you please. None of it has any bearing on my thoughts about what I said.
What you do say is all that matters here, and it clearly means nothing.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #69 on: October 07, 2014, 09:46:27 AM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?

Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #70 on: October 07, 2014, 09:56:36 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You said you were there and gave a specific length of time. This was followed on the same line by the statement that you couldn't tell where you were. Why did you make the first statement if it wasn't what you meant? This doesn't look like a typing error; since you're retracting it now it must have been an intentional fabrication all along.
Take it however you want to and think what you please. None of it has any bearing on my thoughts about what I said.
What you do say is all that matters here, and it clearly means nothing.
Ok, let's leave it at that. Don't beat yourself up over trivialities.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #71 on: October 07, 2014, 10:01:04 AM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?
I was told I was going to Antarctica. I arrived on a place that I was told was Antarctica. There was no way of knowing how I got there. For instance, I dd not know if I was going around an inner circle or if I was going over and upside down on a globe. My senses told me I wasn't going upside down, so the globe was ruled out but then I didn't know if I was going to some inner rim  of an outer circle or an outer rim of an inner circle of ice.
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Can you grasp it now?

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 38783
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #72 on: October 07, 2014, 10:55:00 AM »
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Which 6 months were you there?  How much daylight was there during those 6 months?  Did you see any polar bears or penguins?  Was there any night time while you were there?  If so, did  you look at the stars?  Why would you spend 6 moths at a place where you didn't know where you were?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #73 on: October 07, 2014, 10:55:36 AM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?
I was told I was going to Antarctica. I arrived on a place that I was told was Antarctica. There was no way of knowing how I got there. For instance, I dd not know if I was going around an inner circle or if I was going over and upside down on a globe. My senses told me I wasn't going upside down, so the globe was ruled out but then I didn't know if I was going to some inner rim  of an outer circle or an outer rim of an inner circle of ice.
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Can you grasp it now?
I think I'll go along with this tall tale because, if true, what this story seems to say is you're terribly unobservant and apparently not real bright. You couldn't tell if you were traveling by ship, plane, or land vehicle, or were you drugged and simply dumped somewhere and told to do a job? If the latter, why did you cooperate with whoever did this to you? Why not try to investigate where you were for six months by, like, looking around? Were you at gunpoint the whole time?

Exactly which senses did you rely on to tell if you were "upside down on a globe"? If your feet are toward the ground and head toward the sky what would feel different? Hint: if you had looked at the skies you could easily tell if you were in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. By changes in the length of day and night you could tell what season it was (they're at different times of year in the north and south, in case you didn't know). This may have been too difficult for you to think of, though.

Are you sure what you said is what you think you said, or is it just more balderdash and you really meant something entirely different? As already noted, what you do say means nothing. But it can be amusing, so thanks for that.

"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #74 on: October 07, 2014, 12:01:41 PM »
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Which 6 months were you there?  How much daylight was there during those 6 months?  Did you see any polar bears or penguins?  Was there any night time while you were there?  If so, did  you look at the stars?  Why would you spend 6 moths at a place where you didn't know where you were?
I spent 6 months at this place to study a lot of relevant stuff concerning what I do.
I did not see any Polar bears or penguins. I did look at the sky at but not in any scientific capacity. It was back in the 90's and I was a global brainwashed person so I had no need for questioning, until later on when I realised that I could have been anywhere and how would I know I was on a ball that was rotating.
If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2014, 12:03:12 PM by sceptimatic »

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #75 on: October 07, 2014, 12:12:17 PM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?
I was told I was going to Antarctica. I arrived on a place that I was told was Antarctica. There was no way of knowing how I got there. For instance, I dd not know if I was going around an inner circle or if I was going over and upside down on a globe. My senses told me I wasn't going upside down, so the globe was ruled out but then I didn't know if I was going to some inner rim  of an outer circle or an outer rim of an inner circle of ice.
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Can you grasp it now?
I think I'll go along with this tall tale because, if true, what this story seems to say is you're terribly unobservant and apparently not real bright. You couldn't tell if you were traveling by ship, plane, or land vehicle, or were you drugged and simply dumped somewhere and told to do a job? If the latter, why did you cooperate with whoever did this to you? Why not try to investigate where you were for six months by, like, looking around? Were you at gunpoint the whole time?

Exactly which senses did you rely on to tell if you were "upside down on a globe"? If your feet are toward the ground and head toward the sky what would feel different? Hint: if you had looked at the skies you could easily tell if you were in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. By changes in the length of day and night you could tell what season it was (they're at different times of year in the north and south, in case you didn't know). This may have been too difficult for you to think of, though.

Are you sure what you said is what you think you said, or is it just more balderdash and you really meant something entirely different? As already noted, what you do say means nothing. But it can be amusing, so thanks for that.
It's best to ask normal questions first to understand instead of going off on one.
I started off just like you. I just accepted a rotating Earth, I had no reason not to. It was only over time I started to believe the Earth wasn't spinning but in fact it was a globe that was stationary withthe stars and stuff going around it.

Yeah, you see, I went through all of this but didn't have any real inclination to fully question anything. I just went about my business experimenting for my business, which included tests in conditions all over the world.

My focus was primarily on my work not on stars or universes or suns, planets, etc.
Coming to this forum was the eye opener. It got me thinking more in depth. I don't even subscribe to a lot of what this forum stands for in many things, except the Earth is essentially sort of flat. I like to say "concave"...slightly.

The best way to go along with me is to be a bit more open minded and less of following the norm of the globalites in attempting (and always failing) ridicule.

Play me at this game and you will lose, always because I can soak it up like a sponge...a never ending sponge.
Play nice and I'll afford you the very same. ;D

*

hoppy

  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 11290
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #76 on: October 07, 2014, 01:49:32 PM »
Scepti, is it too much to ask what you were workng on?. All over the world(Antarctica) whatever, why would you need to to those different places?
God is real.                                         
http://www.scribd.com/doc/9665708/Flat-Earth-Bible-02-of-10-The-Flat-Earth

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 38783
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #77 on: October 07, 2014, 04:57:34 PM »
If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
When you first got there, did you notice if the daylight hours seemed unusually long or were they seem unusually short?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

sokarul

  • 16402
  • Discount Chemist
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #78 on: October 07, 2014, 05:15:13 PM »

If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
Would be pretty tough to leave Antarctica in July when there wouldn't be a flight out until October.
Sokarul

ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

Run Sandokhan run

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 38783
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #79 on: October 07, 2014, 05:18:58 PM »

If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
Would be pretty tough to leave Antarctica in July when there wouldn't be a flight out until October.
Unless he was at one of the stations closer to the coast.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

Rama Set

  • 6877
  • I am also an engineer
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #80 on: October 07, 2014, 05:30:53 PM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You're the one twisting.  You said you were in Antarctica for 6 months.

Now you are saying you have no idea where you were for 6 months?  Are you sure this wasn't a dream?
I said I had no idea where I was in the first place, can't you absorb that?

In the first place, you said you were there for 6 months.  Implying you were there for 6 months.  You then modified this statement with "and I couldn't tell where I was."

So, if we are to rely on your testimony, you were there.  Like you said.  In the first place.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

*

sokarul

  • 16402
  • Discount Chemist
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #81 on: October 07, 2014, 05:36:34 PM »

If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
Would be pretty tough to leave Antarctica in July when there wouldn't be a flight out until October.
Unless he was at one of the stations closer to the coast.
We don't need to argue about anything. Sceptic was never in Antarctica.
Sokarul

ANNIHILATOR OF  SHIFTER

Run Sandokhan run

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #82 on: October 08, 2014, 01:12:22 AM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?
I was told I was going to Antarctica. I arrived on a place that I was told was Antarctica. There was no way of knowing how I got there. For instance, I dd not know if I was going around an inner circle or if I was going over and upside down on a globe. My senses told me I wasn't going upside down, so the globe was ruled out but then I didn't know if I was going to some inner rim  of an outer circle or an outer rim of an inner circle of ice.
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Can you grasp it now?
Not really, you sound completely deranged.
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #83 on: October 08, 2014, 03:14:41 AM »
Scepti, is it too much to ask what you were workng on?. All over the world(Antarctica) whatever, why would you need to to those different places?
All I can say is, we needed certain minerals, etc to aid in various projects. These minerals are more abundant and cheaper in various parts of the world.
It was  drill/mining work and costly but worth it.
This was work undertaken for my fathers companies. It helped set me up solidly from that point on.
The other part of the team were on the research and innovative side.
Here's one thing I can tell you, let's see if anyone knows this on here.
Where I was based, (on what I was told was Antarctica, as being on the bottom (south) of a ball Earth, of which I don't know to this day where I was other than it was a place that allowed us to get the required minerals, etc)...we found that the energy we could produce from a machine we invented was 100 times more efficient than it can produce here.
Why?
Magnetism is the key.

There are companies on that base and further afield that are using our equipment to run massive machinery for a day using 1% of the fuel compared to a days usage here which uses 100% more.

I'll give you an example of one such fuel. A diesel generator inside a double shipping container normally has a fuel tank that holds around 2,000 litres of diesel.
The generator of ours fits inside a horse box with a fuel tank of 50 litres capacity that can run the equivalent of 30 fully functioning homes for 12 hours. Bear in mind that when I mean fully functioning homes, I mean a home using all of it's lighting sockets and appliances.

I can't go into the details of it all as it classified as to what and how, as you can understand.


?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #84 on: October 08, 2014, 03:28:31 AM »
If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
When you first got there, did you notice if the daylight hours seemed unusually long or were they seem unusually short?
It was day forever it seemed. I was actually amazed but it went on for a good while and I got so used to it that I started to get the blues when the daytime started to change.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #85 on: October 08, 2014, 03:29:55 AM »

If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
Would be pretty tough to leave Antarctica in July when there wouldn't be a flight out until October.
Unless he was at one of the stations closer to the coast.
I was close to the coast.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #86 on: October 08, 2014, 03:35:10 AM »

I've been to Antarctica.  It was easy to tell I was in high southern latitudes. Everything about my 3-month stay there, and the trips from and back to New Zealand on the way, and the trips between the US and NZ, were completely consistent with a visit to the southernmost region of a spherical earth. Little, if anything, was consistent, in any way, with a flat earth. 


Quote
I was there as well for 6 months and I couldn't tell where I was, except I was cold and the ground was covered in snow and ice.
...

Quote
It's quite easy to respond. I have never, ever said I visited Antarctica.

You are losing track of your own lies.
No, I'm not but I've fixed your attempt at playing your game of twister.  ;D
You're the one twisting.  You said you were in Antarctica for 6 months.

Now you are saying you have no idea where you were for 6 months?  Are you sure this wasn't a dream?
I said I had no idea where I was in the first place, can't you absorb that?

In the first place, you said you were there for 6 months.  Implying you were there for 6 months.  You then modified this statement with "and I couldn't tell where I was."

So, if we are to rely on your testimony, you were there.  Like you said.  In the first place.
I was told it was Antarctica but the truth is I actually don't know what it was. I could have been taken anywhere that was ice and snow covered, apparently down under a ball when in truth I could have simply been going around a circle.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #87 on: October 08, 2014, 03:37:33 AM »

If I recall correctly, I think I was there from February to the middle of July.
Would be pretty tough to leave Antarctica in July when there wouldn't be a flight out until October.
Unless he was at one of the stations closer to the coast.
We don't need to argue about anything. Sceptic was never in Antarctica.
I was told it was Antarctica. Maybe I was in Antarctica but not as the Antarctica we have come to believe. Maybe I went around a circle to the other side and not over and under a ball.
I can only go by what I was told was Antarctica.

?

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23237
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #88 on: October 08, 2014, 03:38:33 AM »
Quote
I said I had no idea where I was

And you spent 6 months there?  Were you blindfolded and kidnapped?  How did you escape the icy wastes in the end?
I was told I was going to Antarctica. I arrived on a place that I was told was Antarctica. There was no way of knowing how I got there. For instance, I dd not know if I was going around an inner circle or if I was going over and upside down on a globe. My senses told me I wasn't going upside down, so the globe was ruled out but then I didn't know if I was going to some inner rim  of an outer circle or an outer rim of an inner circle of ice.
All I know is, I walked on some land of ice and snow and hadn't a clue what it was.
Can you grasp it now?
Not really, you sound completely deranged.
I wasn't aware that my typing made sounds. Do you have one of those speak and spell machines or something?

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #89 on: October 08, 2014, 03:40:11 AM »
scepti, you really need a job or a girlfriend or something.  Maybe a hobby which isn't "making up shit and typing it into random forums"
Quote from: mikeman7918
a single photon can pass through two sluts

Quote from: Chicken Fried Clucker
if Donald Trump stuck his penis in me after trying on clothes I would have that date and time burned in my head.