Antarctica questions

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #150 on: October 11, 2014, 06:30:51 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #151 on: October 11, 2014, 06:50:53 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #152 on: October 11, 2014, 09:16:34 AM »
Scepti, what if there was a big globe that attracted matter towards it's surface, resulting in a person being right-side-up at any give spot anywhere on it's surface, how would a person expect to feel as though they were underneath this globe if they traveled to a region opposite from where they originated?

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #153 on: October 11, 2014, 09:19:53 AM »
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
It's not an assumption, you just stated as much:

Quote
How about you tell me what it means
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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #154 on: October 11, 2014, 10:02:33 AM »
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?


Very valid question.  At various times on these forums, sceptimatic has claimed to have thirteen academic qualifications; to be a research scientists; to be a world-renowned inventor; to have numerous patents for things that we all use every day; to be a "genius" (IQ=125+); to be currently carrying out an expensive experiment with several other scientists; to have travelled to Antarctica; to travel frequently to North Korea at the behest of their government etc.

Strangely though, his abilities [sic] of researching even simple stuff like the meanings of words seem to desert him at crucial moments.

I wonder why?    ;D


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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #155 on: October 11, 2014, 10:16:23 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #156 on: October 11, 2014, 10:21:06 AM »
Scepti, what if there was a big globe that attracted matter towards it's surface, resulting in a person being right-side-up at any give spot anywhere on it's surface, how would a person expect to feel as though they were underneath this globe if they traveled to a region opposite from where they originated?
Then I would have to re-evaluate my thinking. My first thought would be " how could I not be crushed into a ball by this gravity when it attracts the oceans and stops them falling off.
I'd also be curius about the so called poles not spinning and wondering how this force works very similar to the equator, etc.

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #157 on: October 11, 2014, 10:24:08 AM »
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?


Very valid question.  At various times on these forums, sceptimatic has claimed to have thirteen academic qualifications; to be a research scientists; to be a world-renowned inventor; to have numerous patents for things that we all use every day; to be a "genius" (IQ=125+); to be currently carrying out an expensive experiment with several other scientists; to have travelled to Antarctica; to travel frequently to North Korea at the behest of their government etc.

Strangely though, his abilities [sic] of researching even simple stuff like the meanings of words seem to desert him at crucial moments.

I wonder why?    ;D
Quite easily, Geoffrey. It's due to people like you making stuff up to suit your own needs; but let's not dwell on this as this is the Q&A forum. This topic should really be moved to the debate section or general to be honest.
Until it does, I will refrain from posting on it because it's getting lost.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #158 on: October 11, 2014, 10:26:03 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.

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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #159 on: October 11, 2014, 10:27:24 AM »
I'd also be curious about the so called poles not spinning and wondering how this force works very similar to the equator, etc.


Maybe it's not a "force", but rather denpressure?  After all, according to you, denpressure explains more correctly all the previously-held beliefs of physics and mechanics, and which you've claimed to be erroneous.


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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #160 on: October 11, 2014, 10:29:01 AM »
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?


Very valid question.  At various times on these forums, sceptimatic has claimed to have thirteen academic qualifications; to be a research scientists; to be a world-renowned inventor; to have numerous patents for things that we all use every day; to be a "genius" (IQ=125+); to be currently carrying out an expensive experiment with several other scientists; to have travelled to Antarctica; to travel frequently to North Korea at the behest of their government etc.

Strangely though, his abilities [sic] of researching even simple stuff like the meanings of words seem to desert him at crucial moments.

I wonder why?    ;D
Quite easily, Geoffrey. It's due to people like you me making stuff up to suit your my own needs; but let's not dwell on this as this is the Q&A forum. This topic should really be moved to the debate section or general to be honest.
Until it does, I will refrain from posting on it because it'sI'm getting lost.

FTFY
You make it too easy Scepti ;D

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #161 on: October 11, 2014, 10:40:33 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #162 on: October 11, 2014, 11:07:04 AM »
Scepti, what if there was a big globe that attracted matter towards it's surface, resulting in a person being right-side-up at any give spot anywhere on it's surface, how would a person expect to feel as though they were underneath this globe if they traveled to a region opposite from where they originated?
Then I would have to re-evaluate my thinking. My first thought would be " how could I not be crushed into a ball by this gravity when it attracts the oceans and stops them falling off.
I'd also be curius about the so called poles not spinning and wondering how this force works very similar to the equator, etc.

Well, that's a start. Are you wondering why gravitational attraction of the particles that make up your own body wouldn't force it to a spherical shape, or why the attraction between your body and the Earth wouldn't crush you into a puddle (it wouldn't be a "ball")? The answer to either is, simply, that the strength of the forces aren't enough to do so. The mutual gravitational attraction of your own mass is minuscule compared to the mass required to overcome the shear strength of the bones and other tissue you're made of. Your bones are strong enough that you can stand up and support your body's weight, regardless if this weight is due to gravity or an upward acceleration of the Earth itself (or something else).  I'm not sure what the oceans have to do with this - they're really, really massive, so the force to hold them to the Earth must be super-duper strong? If that's it, well the force acting on large masses (like the ocean) is strong because they're massive. The force acting on a small mass is small - in fact, they're proportional, and the constant of proportionality is acceleration. F = MA and all that.

Why do you think the poles wouldn't be spinning? That's what defines the poles, and if you were at one of the poles at night, you could see the stars appear to slowly circle a point directly overhead; in the day, the Sun would appear to circle at a constant elevation above the horizon. "how this force works very similar to the equator" doesn't make any sense - the Equator isn't a force - it's the locus of points at the surface equidistant to both poles (i.e. a circle) - but if you mean why aren't we flung off since the centrifugal force at the Equator is greatest, then the answer is that it does counteract gravity, but by only a small fraction of a percent.

Neither of these concerns is a problem.
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #163 on: October 11, 2014, 11:13:00 AM »
Scepti, what if there was a big globe that attracted matter towards it's surface, resulting in a person being right-side-up at any give spot anywhere on it's surface, how would a person expect to feel as though they were underneath this globe if they traveled to a region opposite from where they originated?
Then I would have to re-evaluate my thinking.
So you don't know.  Why would 'feeling like you were underneath' even be a determining factor in the matter?

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My first thought would be " how could I not be crushed into a ball by this gravity when it attracts the oceans and stops them falling off.
The oceans weigh more than you, and thinking they would 'fall off' implies there is an attractive force separate of the globe's attractive force.  What if there isn't?  Where would they 'fall' to other than against the surface of that globe?

Quote
I'd also be curius about the so called poles not spinning and wondering how this force works very similar to the equator, etc.
Do you expect things to fly off at the equator?  Do you consider one revolution per day as a high rate of spin?

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #164 on: October 11, 2014, 12:13:59 PM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.
Well, I feel that starting a sentence with "If the earth were..." and "What is the earth were..." have the same meaning.  So tell me, why do you feel it changes the meaning.  Because there is nothing for me to work out in this.  It is you that has to explain it to me.  It is you who has trouble with an implied word in a sentence.

If your mom asked you to make here a turkey sandwich, would she need to tell you to put the turkey between two slices of bread?  I mean telling you to make a sandwich implies there is bread involved.

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #165 on: October 12, 2014, 02:30:56 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.
Well, I feel that starting a sentence with "If the earth were..." and "What is the earth were..." have the same meaning.  So tell me, why do you feel it changes the meaning.  Because there is nothing for me to work out in this.  It is you that has to explain it to me.  It is you who has trouble with an implied word in a sentence.

If your mom asked you to make here a turkey sandwich, would she need to tell you to put the turkey between two slices of bread?  I mean telling you to make a sandwich implies there is bread involved.
You are not making any sense, at all.

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Rama Set

  • 6877
  • I am also an engineer
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #166 on: October 12, 2014, 07:04:54 AM »
No, you are having comprehension issues, either intentional or unintentional.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #167 on: October 12, 2014, 07:21:50 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.
Well, I feel that starting a sentence with "If the earth were..." and "What is the earth were..." have the same meaning.  So tell me, why do you feel it changes the meaning.  Because there is nothing for me to work out in this.  It is you that has to explain it to me.  It is you who has trouble with an implied word in a sentence.

If your mom asked you to make here a turkey sandwich, would she need to tell you to put the turkey between two slices of bread?  I mean telling you to make a sandwich implies there is bread involved.
You are not making any sense, at all.
What if you were the genius that you proclaim to be?  Would you still not understand what implied means?  Would you still get confused by a simple typographical error?

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 23789
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #168 on: October 12, 2014, 08:02:53 AM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.
Well, I feel that starting a sentence with "If the earth were..." and "What is the earth were..." have the same meaning.  So tell me, why do you feel it changes the meaning.  Because there is nothing for me to work out in this.  It is you that has to explain it to me.  It is you who has trouble with an implied word in a sentence.

If your mom asked you to make here a turkey sandwich, would she need to tell you to put the turkey between two slices of bread?  I mean telling you to make a sandwich implies there is bread involved.
You are not making any sense, at all.
What if you were the genius that you proclaim to be?  Would you still not understand what implied means?  Would you still get confused by a simple typographical error?
You're not making any sense.

Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #169 on: October 12, 2014, 11:19:01 AM »
Yet another shining example of a high-quality, informative thread, made possible by Septicmatic.

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ausGeoff

  • 6091
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #170 on: October 12, 2014, 12:43:45 PM »
Yet another shining example of a high-quality, informative thread, made possible by Septicmatic.

It is of interest that every thread sceptimatic gets involved with is immediately transformed into a farrago of bullshit.  He seems to have the happy knack of derailing any half-intelligent debate into the level of a kindergarten brawl.  I also love his habit of posting a 4 or 5 word response to a mass of nested quotes that take up a whole screen;  I don't think he even has the minimal knowledge required to edit the size of his posts.

At least only takes a quick glance at the main forums page to ascertain which threads the guy has invaded; they're all the ones with upwards of 60 responses LOL.

The obvious question is of course why do the moderators let him get away with it on the Q&A forum in particular?  But then again I was forgetting—he's a round earther, and one of the favoured few that can do no wrong.  Silly me.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Antarctica questions
« Reply #171 on: October 12, 2014, 06:50:43 PM »
Scepti, do you understand the concept of a "What if...?" question?
Yes I do. Can you point me to where the what if question is?

If isn't a what if, just in case you were going to use it.
If you don't know that the "what" in a "What if..." can be implied, then you obviously don't understand the concept of a "What if..." question.  Thanks for clearing that up.
So show me where the what is.
Do you know what the word implied means?
How about you tell me what it means and get to the point.
How is it that a genius such as yourself doesn't know what words mean, or how to find out what they mean if you don't know?
Why is it that people like you assume that people don't know what words mean?
Because you seem to be having trouble with an implied "what" in a hypothetical question.  Then when pointed out to you that it was implied, you asked again where the "what" was.  It is pretty apparent that you don't know what the word "implied" means based on your responses.
You seem to be having trouble understanding that I've already told you that nobody has said what if to me, so what are you harping on about?
So tell me, does the question asked change at all between starting with "what if" or just "if"?
If so, how?  Please enlighten us.
Work it out.
Well, I feel that starting a sentence with "If the earth were..." and "What is the earth were..." have the same meaning.  So tell me, why do you feel it changes the meaning.  Because there is nothing for me to work out in this.  It is you that has to explain it to me.  It is you who has trouble with an implied word in a sentence.

If your mom asked you to make here a turkey sandwich, would she need to tell you to put the turkey between two slices of bread?  I mean telling you to make a sandwich implies there is bread involved.
You are not making any sense, at all.
What if you were the genius that you proclaim to be?  Would you still not understand what implied means?  Would you still get confused by a simple typographical error?
You're not making any sense.
I think you are proving my point quite well Scepti.