How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2014, 12:33:26 AM »
Would a force be able to reach things on the other side of a solid object? Can forces penetrate through things that otherwise seem solid?
Depends. Can a person move their couch by pushing on a wall? No.

If my coach has iron in it, could I not move it using a strong enough magnet from the other side of a wall?

As I said earlier, it is possible that the Earth is permeable and that different locations allow different amounts of UA to seep through, giving slightly different g readings in different locations.  I am not stating this as a fact; I am only speculating.
Sounds like theoretical physics to me.
Yes, it does.


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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #31 on: April 30, 2014, 12:41:45 AM »
As I said earlier, it is possible that the Earth is permeable and that different locations allow different amounts of UA to seep through, giving slightly different g readings in different locations.  I am not stating this as a fact; I am only speculating.
I know you are speculating but you can't seep Acceleration to be faster or slower. It is like having 50 kids on the buss. They will all feel acceleration all at the same time.

They don't all feel the acceleration at the same time.  If it is a front wheel drive buss, the kids at the front of the buss will feel the acceleration a fraction of a second before the kids at the rear do.  The acceleration travels at the speed of light. 

If you had a cue stick that reached from the Earth to the RE moon and you were somehow able to push it, the rear part of the stick would move a couple of seconds before the tip end of the stick moves. 

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #32 on: April 30, 2014, 12:43:37 AM »
Would a force be able to reach things on the other side of a solid object? Can forces penetrate through things that otherwise seem solid?
Are you saying that the flat earth is a solid object?  Doesn't the FE have a liquid magma layer?

It is possible that there are simply pockets of magma and the rest of the Earth is solid.  This could be why there are not volcanoes everywhere. 

Also, forces can travel through liquids as well as solids. 
« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 01:10:31 AM by jroa »

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #33 on: April 30, 2014, 04:05:38 AM »
As I said earlier, it is possible that the Earth is permeable and that different locations allow different amounts of UA to seep through, giving slightly different g readings in different locations.  I am not stating this as a fact; I am only speculating.
I know you are speculating but you can't seep Acceleration to be faster or slower. It is like having 50 kids on the buss. They will all feel acceleration all at the same time.

They don't all feel the acceleration at the same time.  If it is a front wheel drive buss, the kids at the front of the buss will feel the acceleration a fraction of a second before the kids at the rear do.  The acceleration travels at the speed of light. 

If you had a cue stick that reached from the Earth to the RE moon and you were somehow able to push it, the rear part of the stick would move a couple of seconds before the tip end of the stick moves.
Are you saying the buss is stretching if it is front wheel drive and the buss is compressing if it is rear wheel drive?   

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #34 on: April 30, 2014, 04:20:58 AM »
Yes.   Special Relativity tells us that.

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #35 on: April 30, 2014, 04:28:08 AM »
Yes.   Special Relativity tells us that.
What you are doing is taking the Special Relativity to the extreme. Are you saying people are shorter standing up as if there were laying down on the FE?

Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #36 on: April 30, 2014, 04:54:18 AM »
Yes.   Special Relativity tells us that.
By what distance?

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sandokhan

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2014, 05:38:29 AM »
There is no such thing as the UA acceleration.

http://depalma.pair.com/gyrodrop.html

GYRODROP EXPERIMENT: DEFIANCE OF ATTRACTIVE GRAVITY


The gyro drop proves that the rotating gyroscope falls faster than its non-rotating counterpart (A-10 gravimeter used).






Nowhere in the Principia does Newton mention attractive gravity; on the contrary, he dismisses this known "law" in no uncertain terms:

A letter to Bentley: “That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body can act upon another at a distance through a vacuum without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man, who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it.”

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markjo

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2014, 06:14:42 AM »
There is no such thing as the UA acceleration.

http://depalma.pair.com/gyrodrop.html

GYRODROP EXPERIMENT: DEFIANCE OF ATTRACTIVE GRAVITY
Sandokhan, Universal Acceleration is acceleration, not attractive gravity.  Please try to keep up, will you?
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markjo

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2014, 06:20:41 AM »
Would a force be able to reach things on the other side of a solid object? Can forces penetrate through things that otherwise seem solid?
Are you saying that the flat earth is a solid object?  Doesn't the FE have a liquid magma layer?

It is possible that there are simply pockets of magma and the rest of the Earth is solid.  This could be why there are not volcanoes everywhere.
It is also possible that everything below the crust is magma.  Volcanoes only occur when there are openings in the crust (plate boundaries, hot spots, etc.).

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Also, forces can travel through liquids as well as solids.
That would depend on what is applying the force, don't you think?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2014, 09:05:37 AM »
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid? 

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #41 on: April 30, 2014, 09:07:24 AM »
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?
Magnetism for one and electric is the other one

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #42 on: April 30, 2014, 09:10:32 AM »
You are saying that a magnetic field can not pass through a solid? 

You are also saying that electricity can not pass through a solid object?

Your are really making yourself look dumb. 

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #43 on: April 30, 2014, 09:14:45 AM »
You are saying that a magnetic field can not pass through a solid? 

You are also saying that electricity can not pass through a solid object?

Your are really making yourself look dumb.
It will pass through most solid but it will not to all.
Electric field is a force while electricity is a the glowing of electrons in metal or a vacuum as we know it.

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #44 on: April 30, 2014, 09:16:52 AM »
You are saying that a magnetic field can not pass through a solid? 

You are also saying that electricity can not pass through a solid object?

Your are really making yourself look dumb.
It will pass through most solid but it will not to all.
Electric field is a force while electricity is a the glowing of electrons in metal or a vacuum as we know it.
Metal is a solid. Wires are solid.
What solid won't magnetism pass through?


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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #45 on: April 30, 2014, 09:22:34 AM »
Starman, you are making people think you are not very educated.  That is one of the dumbest things you have said. 

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #46 on: April 30, 2014, 12:09:26 PM »
Starman, you are making people think you are not very educated.  That is one of the dumbest things you have said.
Here is your question. "what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?" You can answer if you like? 

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #47 on: April 30, 2014, 01:55:31 PM »
Starman, you are making people think you are not very educated.  That is one of the dumbest things you have said.
Here is your question. "what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?" You can answer if you like?
Magnetism for one and electric is the other one
That was your answer.
We're discussing how wrong this is.
Read here if you'd like.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force


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sokarul

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #48 on: April 30, 2014, 02:12:43 PM »
Would a force be able to reach things on the other side of a solid object? Can forces penetrate through things that otherwise seem solid?
Depends. Can a person move their couch by pushing on a wall? No.

If my coach has iron in it, could I not move it using a strong enough magnet from the other side of a wall?
It could. It's only one type of force. You did not specify which force you were talking about.


Quote
As I said earlier, it is possible that the Earth is permeable and that different locations allow different amounts of UA to seep through, giving slightly different g readings in different locations.  I am not stating this as a fact; I am only speculating.
Sounds like theoretical physics to me.
Yes, it does.
Might want to refer to your previous thread about how theoretical physics is bad.

As I said earlier, it is possible that the Earth is permeable and that different locations allow different amounts of UA to seep through, giving slightly different g readings in different locations.  I am not stating this as a fact; I am only speculating.
I know you are speculating but you can't seep Acceleration to be faster or slower. It is like having 50 kids on the buss. They will all feel acceleration all at the same time.

They don't all feel the acceleration at the same time.  If it is a front wheel drive buss, the kids at the front of the buss will feel the acceleration a fraction of a second before the kids at the rear do.  The acceleration travels at the speed of light. 

If you had a cue stick that reached from the Earth to the RE moon and you were somehow able to push it, the rear part of the stick would move a couple of seconds before the tip end of the stick moves.
The speed of push is actually equal to the speed of sound in the material, not the speed of light.

...  That is one of the dumbest things you have said. 
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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #49 on: April 30, 2014, 02:47:47 PM »
So then, we are in agreement that a force can penetrate a solid. 

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #50 on: April 30, 2014, 02:50:49 PM »
So then, we are in agreement that a force can penetrate a solid.
Except for maybe Starman.


I don't profess to be correct.
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I am correct.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #51 on: April 30, 2014, 02:52:28 PM »
Starman will just tell you to get an education. 

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markjo

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #52 on: April 30, 2014, 03:46:15 PM »
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?
That depends on what you mean by "force" and "pass through".  It would also depend greatly on the physical properties of the solid or liquid.  For example, magnetic force can pass through paper, but it can't pass through many metals.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #53 on: April 30, 2014, 04:05:37 PM »
What metals will stop magnetic force? 

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sokarul

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #54 on: April 30, 2014, 04:12:20 PM »
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?
That depends on what you mean by "force" and "pass through".  It would also depend greatly on the physical properties of the solid or liquid.  For example, magnetic force can pass through paper, but it can't pass through many metals.
He is being vague on purpose.
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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #55 on: April 30, 2014, 05:21:33 PM »
What metals will stop magnetic force?

I can tell you most precious metals (silver, gold and the like) are non magnetic. I don't know if you equate that with "stopping" magnetic forces or not.

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #56 on: April 30, 2014, 05:30:32 PM »
What metals will stop magnetic force?
Put a compass in a metal can or go inside a steel building. It will not work.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #57 on: April 30, 2014, 05:41:47 PM »
Funny enough, I have a can of soup in front of me, a button compass in my desk, and a fairly strong magnet somewhere (will have to find it).  I will post the result soon.  I need to eat the soup first. 

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Starman

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #58 on: April 30, 2014, 05:46:44 PM »
Funny enough, I have a can of soup in front of me, a button compass in my desk, and a fairly strong magnet somewhere (will have to find it).  I will post the result soon.  I need to eat the soup first.
Now you are out of proportion. Put the compass in the middle of a steel ship and try your magnet.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: How do gravimeters work in the Flat Earth?
« Reply #59 on: April 30, 2014, 05:51:47 PM »
I am currently in a steel building.  Will that work?