Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory

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Salviati

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #90 on: March 14, 2014, 06:35:08 AM »
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed down by atmospheric pressure, also.
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed UP  by atmospheric pressure, also.

It's exactly so, trust me.
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A: Look out the window!

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #91 on: March 14, 2014, 06:36:02 AM »
Here's a better way with your globe.
Get a piece of plastic box wrap, you know the type, the ones they use to package your washing machine and you have to snip them.
Put it around your equator and once you do that, cut a match stick in half and place it over the plastic as though it was wings. You will now notice that to follow your curve anywhere other than the equator line, you have to tip the match left or right to follow that path, meaning you will be turning. Do you get what I'm saying?
Use the box wrap to represent the flight path. You can move the box wrap to circle the earth in every configuration and the match could slide around without lateral deviation.
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Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #92 on: March 14, 2014, 06:40:20 AM »
Please, Sceptimatic, give the relationship between air pressure and weight. I'm asking it for a long time, and still no answer. Why is it so difficult ?

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #93 on: March 14, 2014, 07:49:57 AM »
To keep the questions from cluttering up other threads I have some questions regarding sceptimatic's claim that gravity is a myth, air pressure is in fact responsible for everything we attribute to gravity. So first off, please respond to the fact that bubbles are spherical as a result of air pressure acting equally from all directions at once.
Air bubbles aren't completely perfectly spherical.
That's right.  I'm guessing they appear spherical if they are spinning (causing equal pressure from all sides).

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Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #94 on: March 14, 2014, 07:52:33 AM »
To keep the questions from cluttering up other threads I have some questions regarding sceptimatic's claim that gravity is a myth, air pressure is in fact responsible for everything we attribute to gravity. So first off, please respond to the fact that bubbles are spherical as a result of air pressure acting equally from all directions at once.
Air bubbles aren't completely perfectly spherical.
That's right.  I'm guessing they appear spherical if they are spinning (causing equal pressure from all sides).
They are in 0 gravity.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #95 on: March 14, 2014, 09:26:39 AM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.
Heavy: of great weight; difficult to lift or move
You're suggesting there's no such thing as weight (which is used as a measure of gravity) only air pressure. Mass cannot be heavy because heavy is a measure of weight so what do you mean by this?

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #96 on: March 14, 2014, 09:57:58 AM »
It comes back to the scales. You would need to calibrate scales for both scenarios of in the chamber and out. You would have to put scales inside the chamber, as well.
So, do think there would be a change in measured weight or not?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #97 on: March 14, 2014, 10:14:48 AM »
Here's a better way with your globe.
Get a piece of plastic box wrap, you know the type, the ones they use to package your washing machine and you have to snip them.
Put it around your equator and once you do that, cut a match stick in half and place it over the plastic as though it was wings. You will now notice that to follow your curve anywhere other than the equator line, you have to tip the match left or right to follow that path, meaning you will be turning. Do you get what I'm saying?
What does this even have to do with your water/air pressure "theory"?  The circumnavigation around a globe isn't even being discussed here?  Are you trying to derail a thread about your "theory"
Absolutely nothing and I apologise for that. I was moving between topics and I've obviously posted in this by accident. I've deleted the two posts, now. If the two posts above me are deleted , it's back on topic.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #98 on: March 14, 2014, 10:17:07 AM »
Please, Sceptimatic, give the relationship between air pressure and weight. I'm asking it for a long time, and still no answer. Why is it so difficult ?
Weight is a measure, so what would you like me to say?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #99 on: March 14, 2014, 10:27:48 AM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.
Heavy: of great weight; difficult to lift or move
You're suggesting there's no such thing as weight (which is used as a measure of gravity) only air pressure. Mass cannot be heavy because heavy is a measure of weight so what do you mean by this?
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #100 on: March 14, 2014, 10:29:17 AM »
It comes back to the scales. You would need to calibrate scales for both scenarios of in the chamber and out. You would have to put scales inside the chamber, as well.
So, do think there would be a change in measured weight or not?
On electronic scales, yes I do, if they weren't calibrated for both environments.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #101 on: March 14, 2014, 10:31:55 AM »
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed down by atmospheric pressure, also.
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed UP  by atmospheric pressure, also.

It's exactly so, trust me.
It's being resisted (weakly) by atmospheric pressure. It's a push on push effect, always.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #102 on: March 14, 2014, 11:01:56 AM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?

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Salviati

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #103 on: March 14, 2014, 11:14:11 AM »
It's being resisted (weakly) by atmospheric pressure. It's a push on push effect, always.
This sentence is meaningless, as usual from you. No word in it refers to something clear, well defined, measurable.

Anyway, i repeat: atmospheric pressure, and water pressure as well, exert a push from bottom to up on every material body immersed in it (water or air). No brainwashing, no shoehorned science, no conspiracy, no hard mathematics, only the old Archimedes principle:

https://tinyurl.com/nznuf78

and in air:

https://tinyurl.com/nhv99nc

it's the same principle! Understand? A push bottom-up, not the other way around! No way to argue this, sorry for you. The only way to negate this is to stick your fingers in your ears and sing LA LA LA! Do you want stop saying bullshit at last and open your eyes? Saying air pressure is responsible to push down objects is outrageous! Okay, i repeat, no brainwashing, no shoehorned science, no conspiracy, no hard mathematics, this is a first grade level experience that everyone on earth can prove beyond all doubt, it was discovered more than 2.000 years ago, and nobody ever did refute it. Oh my god, this guy is driving me mad.

In a post of few minutes ago you say:
Quote
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
Speaking about mass and weight is speaking about gravity! The weight is the force that pushes a body towards the centre of the earth. The air pushes it bottom-up!
Q: Why do you think the Earth is round?
A: Look out the window!

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #104 on: March 14, 2014, 11:17:34 AM »
It comes back to the scales. You would need to calibrate scales for both scenarios of in the chamber and out. You would have to put scales inside the chamber, as well.
So, do think there would be a change in measured weight or not?
On electronic scales, yes I do, if they weren't calibrated for both environments.
You do realise that your "calibrating the scales" is just masking the fact that weight changes, not disproving it? It is the equivalent of me saying that a 12 stone man is heavier when holding a 1 pound weight and you saying "ah but if you calibrate the scales to read zero at 1lb he would still weigh 12 stone."
 Assume 1 pound is the extra pull of gravity at sea level compared to 1000 feet and your zeroing of the sales at both altitudes is having the same effect. As gravity or in your case air pressure acts on mass to determine weight, and as gravity or in your case air pressure varies with altitude, you would need to use scales calibrated at a base level to compare the effects.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2014, 11:19:26 AM by glokta »
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #105 on: March 14, 2014, 11:44:46 AM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #106 on: March 14, 2014, 11:49:13 AM »
@scepti, if I jump in the air, why do I come back down again?  You agree that air pressure acts equally from all directions, so I should just float, shouldn't I?
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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #107 on: March 14, 2014, 11:49:49 AM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.
What are typical pressure measurements above and below an object, eg. a book, 1m above the ground?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #108 on: March 14, 2014, 12:02:10 PM »
Anyway, i repeat: atmospheric pressure, and water pressure as well, exert a push from bottom to up on every material body immersed in it (water or air). No brainwashing, no shoehorned science, no conspiracy, no hard mathematics, only the old Archimedes principle:
Not quite!

it's the same principle! Understand? A push bottom-up, not the other way around! No way to argue this, sorry for you.
Not quite!
The only way to negate this is to stick your fingers in your ears and sing LA LA LA! Do you want stop saying bullshit at last and open your eyes?
My eyes are open and my ears are fine.
Saying air pressure is responsible to push down objects is outrageous!
Outrageously true.
Okay, i repeat, no brainwashing, no shoehorned science, no conspiracy, no hard mathematics, this is a first grade level experience that everyone on earth can prove beyond all doubt, it was discovered more than 2.000 years ago, and nobody ever did refute it. Oh my god, this guy is driving me mad.
Why are you people so reliant on someone from 2000 years ago. Isn't technology advanced enough to mention experiments of today?

Speaking about mass and weight is speaking about gravity! The weight is the force that pushes a body towards the centre of the earth. The air pushes it bottom-up!
Atmospheric pressure and friction/vibration is what pushes denser matter through less dense matter into the Earth. The opposite is true from inside to out. It's a marriage made in heaven.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #109 on: March 14, 2014, 12:12:17 PM »
You do realise that your "calibrating the scales" is just masking the fact that weight changes, not disproving it?
Calibrating the scales ensures that the weight of the mass measures accurately showing that they weigh the same.
It is the equivalent of me saying that a 12 stone man is heavier when holding a 1 pound weight and you saying "ah but if you calibrate the scales to read zero at 1lb he would still weigh 12 stone."
No it's not!

 Assume 1 pound is the extra pull of gravity at sea level compared to 1000 feet and your zeroing of the scales at both altitudes is having the same effect. As gravity or in your case air pressure acts on mass to determine weight, and as gravity or in your case air pressure varies with altitude, you would need to use scales calibrated at a base level to compare the effects.
No you wouldn't.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #110 on: March 14, 2014, 12:22:00 PM »
@scepti, if I jump in the air, why do I come back down again?  You agree that air pressure acts equally from all directions, so I should just float, shouldn't I?
Nope! As you jump up, you are jumping up into 15 psi of pressure from a solid ground that was supporting you under that 15psi of pressure. What you have done is compressed the air above you with your own energy which has pushed that air up and around you, so it drags your mass back down and, because what you're doing is always leaving a low pressure void behind you as you jump up and compress that air above which immediately goes to fill the void you created and so pushes you back down.
the problem with people is, they SERIOUSLY and I mean, SERIOUSLY underestimate the strength of the human body and the strength of atmospheric sea level pressure.

The only thing stopping the atmosphere from burying you, is the solid ground. No solid ground and the atmosphere will bury you.
I don't expect you to get what I'm saying because you're set of gravity so no amount of me telling you will make any difference.

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Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #111 on: March 14, 2014, 12:26:59 PM »
@scepti, if I jump in the air, why do I come back down again?  You agree that air pressure acts equally from all directions, so I should just float, shouldn't I?
Nope! As you jump up, you are jumping up into 15 psi of pressure from a solid ground that was supporting you under that 15psi of pressure. What you have done is compressed the air above you with your own energy which has pushed that air up and around you, so it drags your mass back down and, because what you're doing is always leaving a low pressure void behind you as you jump up and compress that air above which immediately goes to fill the void you created and so pushes you back down.
the problem with people is, they SERIOUSLY and I mean, SERIOUSLY underestimate the strength of the human body and the strength of atmospheric sea level pressure.

The only thing stopping the atmosphere from burying you, is the solid ground. No solid ground and the atmosphere will bury you.
I don't expect you to get what I'm saying because you're set of gravity so no amount of me telling you will make any difference.
Am I to believe that the 15 psi is keeping you on the ground?

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #112 on: March 14, 2014, 12:27:45 PM »
Yes, it always pushes down on any mass by squeezing for want of a better word. The thing is, it cannot be proved it doesn't unless you use space as an argument and I discard space as none existent.

Edit to add: As long as the mass is heavier than the air it's in.
There you go "heavier". Your theory of air pressure relies on weight, yes I can see you've written mass but the only way mass is expressed is through gravity.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #113 on: March 14, 2014, 12:30:03 PM »
@scepti, if I jump in the air, why do I come back down again?  You agree that air pressure acts equally from all directions, so I should just float, shouldn't I?
Nope! As you jump up, you are jumping up into 15 psi of pressure from a solid ground that was supporting you under that 15psi of pressure. What you have done is compressed the air above you with your own energy which has pushed that air up and around you, so it drags your mass back down and, because what you're doing is always leaving a low pressure void behind you as you jump up and compress that air above which immediately goes to fill the void you created and so pushes you back down.
the problem with people is, they SERIOUSLY and I mean, SERIOUSLY underestimate the strength of the human body and the strength of atmospheric sea level pressure.
So why do you not fall backwards, the same low pressure is created.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #114 on: March 14, 2014, 12:30:39 PM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.
What are typical pressure measurements above and below an object, eg. a book, 1m above the ground?
Everything is even. It's always aaction/reaction is equal terms. As long as you hold that book, your energy allows that book to have even atmosphere around it, apart from your hand on it that is.
The nano second you drop that book, the atmosphere works on top of it and pushes it down whilst the atmosphere under it tries to resist..but there's just one problem...,as the air is compressed by the book and air above, it always fills the low pressure void that the falling book leaves behind, because it has added a little more PSI of pressure which is immedfiately equalised all the way to the solid floor which stops the process.
I'm sure this will go right past you. If so, create a better scenario and we might get there.

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Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #115 on: March 14, 2014, 12:33:16 PM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.
What are typical pressure measurements above and below an object, eg. a book, 1m above the ground?
Everything is even. It's always aaction/reaction is equal terms. As long as you hold that book, your energy allows that book to have even atmosphere around it, apart from your hand on it that is.
The nano second you drop that book, the atmosphere works on top of it and pushes it down whilst the atmosphere under it tries to resist..but there's just one problem...,as the air is compressed by the book and air above, it always fills the low pressure void that the falling book leaves behind, because it has added a little more PSI of pressure which is immedfiately equalised all the way to the solid floor which stops the process.
I'm sure this will go right past you. If so, create a better scenario and we might get there.
It is true what you are saying but the air pressure is not pushing the book down it is gravity that starts the process.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #116 on: March 14, 2014, 12:37:45 PM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.
What are typical pressure measurements above and below an object, eg. a book, 1m above the ground?
Everything is even. It's always aaction/reaction is equal terms. As long as you hold that book, your energy allows that book to have even atmosphere around it, apart from your hand on it that is.
The nano second you drop that book, the atmosphere works on top of it and pushes it down whilst the atmosphere under it tries to resist..but there's just one problem...,as the air is compressed by the book and air above, it always fills the low pressure void that the falling book leaves behind, because it has added a little more PSI of pressure which is immedfiately equalised all the way to the solid floor which stops the process.
I'm sure this will go right past you. If so, create a better scenario and we might get there.
It is true what you are saying but the air pressure is not pushing the book down it is gravity that starts the process.
This is where we are going to have to differ. I know in my own mind that atmospheric pressure amply deals with everything that happens on earth and you believe gravity, fair enough.
Just ask yourself one question! Why do you accept something that's basically unexplainable as to what it is, when there is something fully explainable that we know is there?

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BJ1234

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #117 on: March 14, 2014, 12:48:58 PM »
Maybe because air pressure doesn't explain it at all ::)

Also, if I jump forward, why do I still continue forward as I start my decent towards earth.  Doesn't my body moving forward create a negative air pressure void behind me as well as under me?

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Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #118 on: March 14, 2014, 12:49:47 PM »
Let me tell you something!  Science loves to play the confuse game with people with this mass/weight issue.
The simplest way to use it is to think of weight as a measurement of mass. If you have a brick you are holding mass. If you want to know what the mass in weight, you measure it by putting it on scales. Simple!
No. Weight is a measure of the gravitational force on an object. This measurement is proportional to the object's mass that is all. An object can't be heavy in mass, I know you don't believe in space but imagine you are there holding this brick it wouldn't be heavy but it would still have the same mass. I'll ask again what do you mean by 'heavy'?
I didn't mention heavy, you did. Also, I'm arguing against gravity and here's you telling me that weight is the measure of gravitational force. Why can't you just say atmospheric pressure like it really is. Why do you hang onto something that cannot be explained.
What are typical pressure measurements above and below an object, eg. a book, 1m above the ground?
Everything is even. It's always aaction/reaction is equal terms. As long as you hold that book, your energy allows that book to have even atmosphere around it, apart from your hand on it that is.
The nano second you drop that book, the atmosphere works on top of it and pushes it down whilst the atmosphere under it tries to resist..but there's just one problem...,as the air is compressed by the book and air above, it always fills the low pressure void that the falling book leaves behind, because it has added a little more PSI of pressure which is immedfiately equalised all the way to the solid floor which stops the process.
I'm sure this will go right past you. If so, create a better scenario and we might get there.
It is true what you are saying but the air pressure is not pushing the book down it is gravity that starts the process.
This is where we are going to have to differ. I know in my own mind that atmospheric pressure amply deals with everything that happens on earth and you believe gravity, fair enough.
Just ask yourself one question! Why do you accept something that's basically unexplainable as to what it is, when there is something fully explainable that we know is there?
Gravity is not fully understood. It is like electron flowing in wires. You can't see it but you can see and feel the effect of it. The other thing is that million of smart people (engineers, scientist, teachers) collectively accept what it is. I do have the sense to think it all make sense. I don't just jump in a mindset of disbelief. I also don't look at another theory and jump in. Science is a collection of many things that work together not just one at a time.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2014, 12:53:55 PM by Starman »

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #119 on: March 14, 2014, 12:53:06 PM »
Maybe because air pressure doesn't explain it at all ::)

Also, if I jump forward, why do I still continue forward as I start my decent towards earth.  Doesn't my body moving forward create a negative air pressure void behind me as well as under me?
It sure does, which is the very reason you ARC as you fall.