Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #60 on: March 13, 2014, 12:34:41 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #61 on: March 13, 2014, 12:46:54 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
So it is harder to lift an object under water than the same object out of water?
It depends on the density, which is why I used gold and the water just to highlight what I'm saying.
Objects weigh less underwater due to water displacement. The objects weight is its atmospheric weight minus the weight of the water displaced - so in salt water it would weigh even less.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #62 on: March 13, 2014, 12:48:38 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
So it is harder to lift an object under water than the same object out of water?
It depends on the density, which is why I used gold and the water just to highlight what I'm saying.
Objects weigh less underwater due to water displacement. The objects weight is its atmospheric weight minus the weight of the water displaced - so in salt water it would weigh even less.
You're missing the point totally. It's not about what they weigh, it's all about pressure and resistance to it. It's important that you grasp this because otherwise you'll go right off track.

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #63 on: March 13, 2014, 12:49:08 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.
The problem is your example falls apart. 
If you try lifting a 200+lb person on the beach, it is very difficult.  You go in the water, and that person is easier to lift.  Therefore, the water is making things easier to lift.  Not harder.

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #64 on: March 13, 2014, 12:53:02 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.
The problem is your example falls apart. 
If you try lifting a 200+lb person on the beach, it is very difficult.  You go in the water, and that person is easier to lift.  Therefore, the water is making things easier to lift.  Not harder.
I'm not talking about buoyancy, I'm talking about resistance to force. I used two gold bars with water as merely a highlight. The string should have given that away.
I simply used it to show the difference of pulling against resistance.

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burt

  • 849
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #65 on: March 13, 2014, 12:54:19 PM »
Metal is heavier than water, yet, we still make ships out of it.

Ships aren't heavier (per cubic meter) than water.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #66 on: March 13, 2014, 12:57:55 PM »
Metal is heavier than water, yet, we still make ships out of it.
Eh? What does this even mean?  Which ship is heavier than which water?  Are ships heavier than the atlantic?

Perhaps you mean metal is denser than water.  Have you been taking science lessons from scepti?   :P
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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #67 on: March 13, 2014, 12:59:35 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.
The problem is your example falls apart. 
If you try lifting a 200+lb person on the beach, it is very difficult.  You go in the water, and that person is easier to lift.  Therefore, the water is making things easier to lift.  Not harder.
I'm not talking about buoyancy, I'm talking about resistance to force. I used two gold bars with water as merely a highlight. The string should have given that away.
I simply used it to show the difference of pulling against resistance.
buoyancy is resistance to force. It is the resistance of an object to the weight of water above. Imagine a swimming float and how it gets progressively harder to pull deeper underwater.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 01:02:00 PM by glokta »
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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burt

  • 849
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #68 on: March 13, 2014, 01:04:37 PM »
Metal is heavier than water, yet, we still make ships out of it.
Eh? What does this even mean?  Which ship is heavier than which water?  Are ships heavier than the atlantic?

Perhaps you mean metal is denser than water.  Have you been taking science lessons from scepti?   :P

What do you mean by "denser"? Because you can make anything have the same density, just by changing the volume or the mass, or both.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #69 on: March 13, 2014, 01:05:07 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.
The problem is your example falls apart. 
If you try lifting a 200+lb person on the beach, it is very difficult.  You go in the water, and that person is easier to lift.  Therefore, the water is making things easier to lift.  Not harder.
I'm not talking about buoyancy, I'm talking about resistance to force. I used two gold bars with water as merely a highlight. The string should have given that away.
I simply used it to show the difference of pulling against resistance.
buoyancy is resistance to force. It is the resistance of the weight of water above an object. Imagine a swimming float and how it gets progressively harder to pull deeper underwater.
Yes, on water. Like I said; it will go right off track if we talk about that. I used one simple example with the gold to highlight force against resistance which is what we are discussing, by HUMAN intervention, as in lifting the gold bars to feel the difference in resistance, that's all.
We can discuss water later on as it all marries in all the way through the Earth. It's just that we are discussing atmospheric pressure being gravity.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #70 on: March 13, 2014, 01:07:23 PM »
Metal is heavier than water, yet, we still make ships out of it.

Ships aren't heavier (per cubic meter) than water.
The weight of the ship and air contained within is less than the weight of the volume of water displaced. Fill that ship with water and it sinks as it weighs more. Pretty basic stuff.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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burt

  • 849
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #71 on: March 13, 2014, 01:12:07 PM »
Fill that ship with water and it sinks as it weighs more. Pretty basic stuff.

Can you explain why this is relevant? More precisely why does it seem you are assuming that I don't know this?

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #72 on: March 13, 2014, 01:16:06 PM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it?
No, I didn't. I said weight is a measure of the mass of an object including atmospheric pressure acting upon it.
High pressure or extreme low pressure is still atmospheric pressure.
Please provide a formula to determine the weight of an object.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #73 on: March 13, 2014, 01:21:43 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.
Wood is full of air. Don't concentrate on the water, I was using it as a highlight due to the fact that testing stuff in extremely low to high pressures at sea level cannot be done as a sufficient test.
The problem is your example falls apart. 
If you try lifting a 200+lb person on the beach, it is very difficult.  You go in the water, and that person is easier to lift.  Therefore, the water is making things easier to lift.  Not harder.
I'm not talking about buoyancy, I'm talking about resistance to force. I used two gold bars with water as merely a highlight. The string should have given that away.
I simply used it to show the difference of pulling against resistance.
buoyancy is resistance to force. It is the resistance of the weight of water above an object. Imagine a swimming float and how it gets progressively harder to pull deeper underwater.
Yes, on water. Like I said; it will go right off track if we talk about that. I used one simple example with the gold to highlight force against resistance which is what we are discussing, by HUMAN intervention, as in lifting the gold bars to feel the difference in resistance, that's all.
We can discuss water later on as it all marries in all the way through the Earth. It's just that we are discussing atmospheric pressure being gravity.
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #74 on: March 13, 2014, 01:24:02 PM »
Fill that ship with water and it sinks as it weighs more. Pretty basic stuff.

Can you explain why this is relevant? More precisely why does it seem you are assuming that I don't know this?
It was in response to jroa's metal boat post.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

?

burt

  • 849
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #75 on: March 13, 2014, 01:27:39 PM »
Fill that ship with water and it sinks as it weighs more. Pretty basic stuff.

Can you explain why this is relevant? More precisely why does it seem you are assuming that I don't know this?
It was in response to jroa's metal boat post.

Well, glotka, my man/woman, seems we are on the same page.

[eidt: because of male chauvanism]

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #76 on: March 13, 2014, 01:32:39 PM »
Fill that ship with water and it sinks as it weighs more. Pretty basic stuff.

Can you explain why this is relevant? More precisely why does it seem you are assuming that I don't know this?
It was in response to jroa's metal boat post.

Well, glotka, my man/woman, seems we are on the same page.

[eidt: because of male chauvanism]
A pertinent point very well made.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #77 on: March 13, 2014, 01:34:08 PM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.

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Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #78 on: March 13, 2014, 02:17:05 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same bar in the water will it weight the same? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that you are saying. Yes if the water was butter the viscosity will make it harder to pull but will weight more? 

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #79 on: March 13, 2014, 02:25:37 PM »
Scepti - please provide a formula to determine the weight of an object.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #80 on: March 13, 2014, 02:30:29 PM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.
But you still haven't defined what weight is and how air pressure affects it?? You can't say gravity is a myth and it's all air pressure if you can't explain why air pressure has no effect on weight....
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #81 on: March 14, 2014, 03:43:43 AM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.
But you still haven't defined what weight is and how air pressure affects it?? You can't say gravity is a myth and it's all air pressure if you can't explain why air pressure has no effect on weight....
Weight is a measure of the density/mass of anything. You can only measure the weight of something by placing that something on a scale of whatever description.
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed down by atmospheric pressure, also.

The paving stones' make up... the matter that it's made up of, came from under the ground in various dense elements compacted into one slab, so basically it was PUSHED up (or pulled by man) from it's natural place in the Earth's crust and is up against a less severe compression from above, as in air pressure than it was when under the crust.
The reason why I'm going into this detail, is to simply show that pressure comes in all forms from molten rock, metals, to hardened rock/metals, then liquids/gases of varying elements all in a state of a pressure crush, all the way to the top of the atmosphere.
Everything is under compression and under friction by force of pressure of one dense particle above a less dense particle down wards and upwards.
For instance: Anything that is under pressure from above is pushed down and anything pushed down will release the lighter elements by pushing them up into the atmosphere, so basically we have a high and low pressure game, all caused by compression/friction... causing pressure changes due to agitation and heat which gets super dense and under super friction in the centre of Earth (the sun).

I've babbled on with that, I've done it so you get the idea of what's happening and it's got nothing whatsoever to do with gravity as we are living in a sealed unit that proves all our life support and the life support of every living thing in this Earth. No gravity needed nor required.
Gravity is simply a made up word that describes a pretence and keeps the illusion of space and planets alive...not to mention the so called exploits of man and machine in that space. It's all hokus pokus and I do not buy into it for one second. That's my honest opinion and everyone is entitled to one.

Read this if you want to or not, which goes for everyone. If you read it and don't like it then just be civil about it and I will afford you the same.

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #82 on: March 14, 2014, 03:48:13 AM »
Well it works just as well with a balloon filled with helium weighing less than the air it displaces and rising. You still haven't found anyway of replacing the fact that weight = mass x gravity.
Which is why, earlier in the thread; said, that as long as the mass is HEAVIER than the air it's in.
But you still haven't defined what weight is and how air pressure affects it?? You can't say gravity is a myth and it's all air pressure if you can't explain why air pressure has no effect on weight....
Weight is a measure of the density/mass of anything. You can only measure the weight of something by placing that something on a scale of whatever description.
If you put a paving stone on a scale plate, you measure the weight of that paving stone, bearing in mind it's area is being pushed down by atmospheric pressure, also.

The paving stones' make up... the matter that it's made up of, came from under the ground in various dense elements compacted into one slab, so basically it was PUSHED up (or pulled by man) from it's natural place in the Earth's crust and is up against a less severe compression from above, as in air pressure than it was when under the crust.
The reason why I'm going into this detail, is to simply show that pressure comes in all forms from molten rock, metals, to hardened rock/metals, then liquids/gases of varying elements all in a state of a pressure crush, all the way to the top of the atmosphere.
Everything is under compression and under friction by force of pressure of one dense particle above a less dense particle down wards and upwards.
For instance: Anything that is under pressure from above is pushed down and anything pushed down will release the lighter elements by pushing them up into the atmosphere, so basically we have a high and low pressure game, all caused by compression/friction... causing pressure changes due to agitation and heat which gets super dense and under super friction in the centre of Earth (the sun).

I've babbled on with that, I've done it so you get the idea of what's happening and it's got nothing whatsoever to do with gravity as we are living in a sealed unit that proves all our life support and the life support of every living thing in this Earth. No gravity needed nor required.
Gravity is simply a made up word that describes a pretence and keeps the illusion of space and planets alive...not to mention the so called exploits of man and machine in that space. It's all hokus pokus and I do not buy into it for one second. That's my honest opinion and everyone is entitled to one.

Read this if you want to or not, which goes for everyone. If you read it and don't like it then just be civil about it and I will afford you the same.
Back you your earlier statement...If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same in the water? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that what you said?
« Last Edit: March 14, 2014, 03:52:51 AM by Starman »

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sceptimatic

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  • 28374
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #83 on: March 14, 2014, 04:26:06 AM »

Back you your earlier statement...If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same in the water? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that what you said?
Nope! I said that it would be harder to pull up the bar from the water than it would from the floor because of resistance'
Let's put it another way. You can open a car door much easier at the road side than you could if it was under water, right?
Well equate that to the gold bars, it's the same thing.

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #84 on: March 14, 2014, 04:26:33 AM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.

Back you your earlier statement...If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same in the water? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that what you said?

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Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #85 on: March 14, 2014, 04:27:39 AM »

Back you your earlier statement...If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same in the water? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that what you said?
Nope! I said that it would be harder to pull up the bar from the water than it would from the floor because of resistance'
Let's put it another way. You can open a car door much easier at the road side than you could if it was under water, right?
Well equate that to the gold bars, it's the same thing.
Ok Now you are talking about viscosity.

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sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #86 on: March 14, 2014, 04:33:53 AM »

Back you your earlier statement...If you just weigh a bar of gold out of the water will it weight the same in the water? You said the water pressure will make weight it more. Is that what you said?
Nope! I said that it would be harder to pull up the bar from the water than it would from the floor because of resistance'
Let's put it another way. You can open a car door much easier at the road side than you could if it was under water, right?
Well equate that to the gold bars, it's the same thing.
Ok Now you are talking about viscosity.
It doesn't matter what people want to call it. I'm simply saying that resistance is the force that will make you feel that one bar is heavier, until you reach the surface to find that they are in fact, the same.

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Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #87 on: March 14, 2014, 05:03:07 AM »
Here's a better way with your globe.
Get a piece of plastic box wrap, you know the type, the ones they use to package your washing machine and you have to snip them.
Put it around your equator and once you do that, cut a match stick in half and place it over the plastic as though it was wings. You will now notice that to follow your curve anywhere other than the equator line, you have to tip the match left or right to follow that path, meaning you will be turning. Do you get what I'm saying?
i have no idea what you are describing. Draw me a picture of it.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #88 on: March 14, 2014, 05:08:08 AM »
Here's a better way with your globe.
Get a piece of plastic box wrap, you know the type, the ones they use to package your washing machine and you have to snip them.
Put it around your equator and once you do that, cut a match stick in half and place it over the plastic as though it was wings. You will now notice that to follow your curve anywhere other than the equator line, you have to tip the match left or right to follow that path, meaning you will be turning. Do you get what I'm saying?

HOLY CRAP! This can't be happening. Nobody can be this dense. Haha funny joke. I get it. You are trolling. It is impossible for anyone over 7 years old to not understand a line around a sphere goes straight without turning . Sorry, this is impossible!

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BJ1234

  • 1931
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #89 on: March 14, 2014, 06:09:14 AM »
Here's a better way with your globe.
Get a piece of plastic box wrap, you know the type, the ones they use to package your washing machine and you have to snip them.
Put it around your equator and once you do that, cut a match stick in half and place it over the plastic as though it was wings. You will now notice that to follow your curve anywhere other than the equator line, you have to tip the match left or right to follow that path, meaning you will be turning. Do you get what I'm saying?
What does this even have to do with your water/air pressure "theory"?  The circumnavigation around a globe isn't even being discussed here?  Are you trying to derail a thread about your "theory"