Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2014, 01:34:09 AM »
Air acts evenly all around the bubble after the bubble has been formed by air entering a liquid and envelopes it.

Thanks.

I don't really know how exactly you want me to answer this question any other way.

You seemed to do a pretty good job. Well done  ;D
So to conclude, air pressure acts equally from all directions.
Yes, in perfect conditions.
So in your theory air pressure pushes down on things in place of gravity - except for the times it can be proved it doesn't?
Yes, it always pushes down on any mass by squeezing for want of a better word. The thing is, it cannot be proved it doesn't unless you use space as an argument and I discard space as none existent.

Edit to add: As long as the mass is heavier than the air it's in.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 01:36:35 AM by sceptimatic »

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2014, 06:12:35 AM »
Air acts evenly all around the bubble after the bubble has been formed by air entering a liquid and envelopes it.

Thanks.

I don't really know how exactly you want me to answer this question any other way.
So, why aren't we all floating around like bubbles?

You seemed to do a pretty good job. Well done  ;D
So to conclude, air pressure acts equally from all directions.
Yes, in perfect conditions.
So, why aren't we all floating around like bubbles?

Quote
the mass is heavier
What causes mass to be heavy?
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 06:14:34 AM by JimmyTheCrab »
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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2014, 06:49:30 AM »

So, why aren't we all floating around like bubbles?
Because our mass easily overcomes the atmosphere we are in. Our place is on the crust. The best we can do is to try and over come the pressure using force, as in jumping...but as you soon realise, the atmospheric pressure that you've just compressed by jumping up and it stops you quickly, then your own mass easily falls through the resistance of the air under you aided by the atmosphere filling the void you leave behind as you fall back down.

What causes mass to be heavy?
A build up of matter/molecules that become heavier than the atmosphere it is in. If it's lighter, it floats up, or inreality it's squeezed upwards, just the same as denser mass is squeezed downwards , not just by atmospheric pressure but by it's own make up acting on itself and against the crust of the Earth.
No special gravity needed that cannot be explained.

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #33 on: March 13, 2014, 07:16:06 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #34 on: March 13, 2014, 09:15:32 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2014, 09:22:19 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #36 on: March 13, 2014, 09:37:45 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #37 on: March 13, 2014, 09:56:11 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.
What about the fact that objects in a vacuum still have a weight? I think they weigh slightly more in fact.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2014, 10:19:40 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.
What about the fact that objects in a vacuum still have a weight? I think they weigh slightly more in fact.
A vacuum cannot exist inside Earth. The best that can be hoped for is extreme low pressure, which will naturally create much less resistance on a falling object, allowing it to fall faster. It's the reason why a feather and a coin can drop pretty close to each other, because the feather is encountering very little resistance.

Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #39 on: March 13, 2014, 10:21:06 AM »

So, why aren't we all floating around like bubbles?
Because our mass easily overcomes the atmosphere we are in. Our place is on the crust. The best we can do is to try and over come the pressure using force, as in jumping...but as you soon realise, the atmospheric pressure that you've just compressed by jumping up and it stops you quickly, then your own mass easily falls through the resistance of the air under you aided by the atmosphere filling the void you leave behind as you fall back down.
You fall back in to a void?  How come long jumpers come back down then?  Shouldn't they just float off?

What causes mass to be heavy?
A build up of matter/molecules that become heavier than the atmosphere it is in.
You've really just said that mass becomes heavy becuase it becomes heavy.

What actually causes this "build up of matter" to be heavy?  If the only thing that keeps us on the floor is air pressure, then how come I don't float around like a bubble?  Or conversely, why do air bubbles float instead of dropping back down "into the void"?
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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #40 on: March 13, 2014, 10:24:20 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.
What about the fact that objects in a vacuum still have a weight? I think they weigh slightly more in fact.
A vacuum cannot exist inside Earth. The best that can be hoped for is extreme low pressure, which will naturally create much less resistance on a falling object, allowing it to fall faster. It's the reason why a feather and a coin can drop pretty close to each other, because the feather is encountering very little resistance.
OK well assuming a vacuum chamber is really just creating extremely low pressure, how does that explain that a resting objects weight is not negatively affected in said chamber?
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #41 on: March 13, 2014, 10:32:04 AM »
You fall back in to a void?  How come long jumpers come back down then?  Shouldn't they just float off?

I didn't say they fall INTO a void, I said their fall leaves a void to be filled all the way to the deck.

What actually causes this "build up of matter" to be heavy? 
The ejection out of the Earth by natural or man made means. What goes up that's heavier than air, must come down and that includes dense matter under Earths crust. Just like water soaks back into the Earth's upper crust.
If the only thing that keeps us on the floor is air pressure, then how come I don't float around like a bubble?  Or conversely, why do air bubbles float instead of dropping back down "into the void"?
Air bubbles don't float, they fall. They fall because of the skin round them which is more dense than the air it's in. The only time a bubble will float is when force is applied, whether that's wind, or you blowing on it, etc. In a calm environment, it slowly falls because the resistance of air is harder to overcome by the spread out bubble skin.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #42 on: March 13, 2014, 10:37:48 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.
What about the fact that objects in a vacuum still have a weight? I think they weigh slightly more in fact.
A vacuum cannot exist inside Earth. The best that can be hoped for is extreme low pressure, which will naturally create much less resistance on a falling object, allowing it to fall faster. It's the reason why a feather and a coin can drop pretty close to each other, because the feather is encountering very little resistance.
OK well assuming a vacuum chamber is really just creating extremely low pressure, how does that explain that a resting objects weight is not negatively affected in said chamber?
It comes back to the scales. You would need to calibrate scales for both scenarios of in the chamber and out. You would have to put scales inside the chamber, as well.

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Salviati

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #43 on: March 13, 2014, 10:45:13 AM »
A vacuum cannot exist inside Earth. The best that can be hoped for is extreme low pressure, which will naturally create much less resistance on a falling object, allowing it to fall faster. It's the reason why a feather and a coin can drop pretty close to each other, because the feather is encountering very little resistance.
:o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o
I can't believe it!! Scepti said something right!!
Q: Why do you think the Earth is round?
A: Look out the window!

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2014, 10:46:29 AM »
What's the difference between mass and weight?
Weight is just a measurement, That's all it is. Mass placed on a scale will give you the weight of that mass.
What's it a measurement of if not gravity? Air pressure is measured in different units and different ways before you say that.
Weight is a measurement of a mass of matter. No gravity involved. The gravity is just what they put into peoples heads to describe what atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.
What about the fact that objects in a vacuum still have a weight? I think they weigh slightly more in fact.
A vacuum cannot exist inside Earth. The best that can be hoped for is extreme low pressure, which will naturally create much less resistance on a falling object, allowing it to fall faster. It's the reason why a feather and a coin can drop pretty close to each other, because the feather is encountering very little resistance.
OK well assuming a vacuum chamber is really just creating extremely low pressure, how does that explain that a resting objects weight is not negatively affected in said chamber?
It comes back to the scales. You would need to calibrate scales for both scenarios of in the chamber and out. You would have to put scales inside the chamber, as well.
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
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Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #45 on: March 13, 2014, 10:59:01 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #46 on: March 13, 2014, 11:10:15 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #47 on: March 13, 2014, 11:14:12 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #48 on: March 13, 2014, 11:23:56 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it? 
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #49 on: March 13, 2014, 11:31:27 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it?
No, I didn't. I said weight is a measure of the mass of an object including atmospheric pressure acting upon it.
High pressure or extreme low pressure is still atmospheric pressure.

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glokta

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2014, 11:37:10 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it?
No, I didn't. I said weight is a measure of the mass of an object including atmospheric pressure acting upon it.
High pressure or extreme low pressure is still atmospheric pressure.
Yes and the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #51 on: March 13, 2014, 11:44:08 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it?
No, I didn't. I said weight is a measure of the mass of an object including atmospheric pressure acting upon it.
High pressure or extreme low pressure is still atmospheric pressure.
Yes and the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
Of course it does. I've just explained why it does. Low and high pressure. Nothing exists without it.

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glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #52 on: March 13, 2014, 11:52:40 AM »
And how would you "calibrate" them? Given that a 1kg weight still weighs 1kg inside a vacuum chamber? What do you think it should weigh given the vacuum or "extremely low air pressure"?
That's just the point. There would be no change. The only way to verify it is to have  an electronic scale with a plate that registers minus as it's pulled upwards and well as registering plus as it's pushed. That way you can calibrate it exactly from outside or inside a chamber.
But given you say air pressure is responsible for weight, why is their not a change of weight in the vacuum? The best way to test this would be to monitor the weight of the object during creation of the vacuum. In your model the object should way less and less as the air pressure is decreased.
It would appear to weigh slightly less if the scales weren't calibrated for that environment.
But the whole point of your air pressure in place of gravity theory is that the weight of something is caused by air pressure, now you are saying in a vacuum or what you call "extremely low air pressure" something only appears to weigh less.
Quote
Weight is a measurement of a mass of
matter. No gravity involved. The
gravity is just what they put into
peoples heads to describe what
atmospheric pressure and mass do for weight measurement.


So which is it?
No, I didn't. I said weight is a measure of the mass of an object including atmospheric pressure acting upon it.
High pressure or extreme low pressure is still atmospheric pressure.
Yes and the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
Of course it does. I've just explained why it does. Low and high pressure. Nothing exists without it.
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #53 on: March 13, 2014, 12:08:31 PM »
 
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.

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Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #54 on: March 13, 2014, 12:15:06 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.

*

sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #55 on: March 13, 2014, 12:21:01 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?

*

glokta

  • 598
Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #56 on: March 13, 2014, 12:23:00 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
So it is harder to lift an object under water than the same object out of water?
Quote from: sceptimatic
Use your brain. There is no sun in space. You are simply duped.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #57 on: March 13, 2014, 12:25:47 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
So it is harder to lift an object under water than the same object out of water?
It depends on the density, which is why I used gold and the water just to highlight what I'm saying.

?

Starman

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #58 on: March 13, 2014, 12:31:05 PM »
Once again - the weight remains the same in high or low pressure therefore air pressure has no effect on weight.
The WEIGHT remains the same for the measuring scales if calibrated. The mass of the actual object would be the same to your view.
The reality would be that for you to pick up the object in both environments, the low pressure one would be easier to pick up, so would feel lighter, IF you could do it in that environment, which you can't.

The best way to give you an idea is to use the ground and a deep swimming pool. Get a piece of string and tie it around both bars. Pick one bar up off of the ground  and feel the force it exerts against your pull.
Now drop one into the pool, then lift that out and you will find that the force to lift is, is greater, because it's under more pressure..
The thing is...when you place them aide by side, they weigh the same.
Hehehehe. This one you can try in the bathtub. Try it will a piece of wood.
You are totally missing the point. What is wood full of?
Wood is full of wood. It will not sink so your water pressure does not apply Actually if you had gold it is denser than water and will sink but the gold will displace water and dave displacement. It will weight less than water.

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Re: Questions regarding the Sceptimatic "Air pressure" Theory
« Reply #59 on: March 13, 2014, 12:32:28 PM »
Metal is heavier than water, yet, we still make ships out of it.