How does Satellite TV Work?

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #90 on: February 27, 2014, 05:33:45 AM »
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish.
Just for starters, they aren't dishes, they are parabolas, and are highly directional.

Millions of people live on the coast of the ocean and many of them have parabolas pointing at the sky above the ocean.
If you give a nudge to the parabola the signal get lost, and you get it back if you re-align the parabola exactly as it was before. No towers at all in the middle of the ocean.
Well then, what are they pointing at? Answer please.
Look along the coast and you'll find plenty of transmitters. Your dish is a dish for a reason. Understand that.
Transmitters for what?

The dish is parabola shaped for maximum gain.  It receives from a satellite in the sky.
Transmitters for your TV, you know, the SKY TV you watch that are recieving the signal from ground based transmitters that your dish catches.
It's a dish for a reason or a parabola, whichever you want to call it now. I mean I don't hear many people saying " Oh, they're coming to install my new parabola tomorrow" do you?

We all know what a TV dish is and we all know it's to catch a direct signal that the dish can catch once it's angled in the general direction of a transmitter.
As you cannot give transmitter locations or explain why dishes on the coast point south over the sea I wonder what you skills are.

Parabola is the mathematical shape.  It is not the general direction, they have to be accirately aligned.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #91 on: February 27, 2014, 05:35:39 AM »
The satellite TV dish on my roof points North, at an elevation angle of 54 from horizontal. It is VERY directional; moving it 1 off-target will result in total loss of reception. This means that any tower would have to be placed North of me, and be twice as high as it

was far away (ie a tower 1 mile away would have to be almost 2 miles tall). The tallest tower near where I live is 40km to the East, and a relative altitude of approximately 1km. So what's my dish p
ointing at?
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish. All it has to do is catch the signal at whatever transmitter is around, so yours like everyone elses will be coming from the nearest relay to you.
Transmitters aren't just confined to a few miles away. If you look around you, you will see one. You may not believe it's transmitting anything to you but then again, if satellites are shrouded, then nobody is going to tell you what's really going on, are they.

Why don't you look up how many supposed satellites are covering the whole of the UK and see what you think.

You have no training or degree in this field. I DO!! Yes it is a dish but not a like a butterfly net. It works by reflecting signals to a focal point. Think of it as a electronic telescope. Signal from the side will not be reflected to the amplifier inside the dish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_antenna. Don't make claims you know nothing about.
Don't profess to be an expert and then stick wiki up for me to look at.  ;)

I worked with satellite systems for many years. Our dish was 15ft in diameter. It was directed to an communication satellite (anik) so air traffic controllers can communicate to remote sites to increase radio coverage.
What remote sites do these air traffic controllers have to cover?
The air space in the east coast of Canada is very large. It covers areas in Labrador.  Airlines follow the jet stream to save fuel. If the jet stream is north of Labrador, the controller at the Moncton air traffic control center needs communication to pilots in that remote area. Because the northern area have very little "reliable" audio lines satellite communication does the trick. When the controller talks to an pilot his audio leave the control center through the satellite system. The signal at the satellite is retransmitted back to earth. At the remote site the satellite receiving equipment sends the audio to a transmitting site. The site can then transmit the audio to the pilot. The transmitting station has a range of 150 miles. When the pilot talk to the controller the process is reverse.
So let's get this straight.
The air traffic controller bounces his signal off the satellite and that reaches the plane in the air and then the plane in the air then sends that signal back by bouncing it off of the same satellite and back to the controller. Is this correct?

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #92 on: February 27, 2014, 05:37:42 AM »
The satellite TV dish on my roof points North, at an elevation angle of 54 from horizontal. It is VERY directional; moving it 1 off-target will result in total loss of reception. This means that any tower would have to be placed North of me, and be twice as high as it

was far away (ie a tower 1 mile away would have to be almost 2 miles tall). The tallest tower near where I live is 40km to the East, and a relative altitude of approximately 1km. So what's my dish p
ointing at?
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish. All it has to do is catch the signal at whatever transmitter is around, so yours like everyone elses will be coming from the nearest relay to you.
Transmitters aren't just confined to a few miles away. If you look around you, you will see one. You may not believe it's transmitting anything to you but then again, if satellites are shrouded, then nobody is going to tell you what's really going on, are they.

Why don't you look up how many supposed satellites are covering the whole of the UK and see what you think.

You have no training or degree in this field. I DO!! Yes it is a dish but not a like a butterfly net. It works by reflecting signals to a focal point. Think of it as a electronic telescope. Signal from the side will not be reflected to the amplifier inside the dish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_antenna. Don't make claims you know nothing about.
Don't profess to be an expert and then stick wiki up for me to look at.  ;)

I worked with satellite systems for many years. Our dish was 15ft in diameter. It was directed to an communication satellite (anik) so air traffic controllers can communicate to remote sites to increase radio coverage.
What remote sites do these air traffic controllers have to cover?
The air space in the east coast of Canada is very large. It covers areas in Labrador.  Airlines follow the jet stream to save fuel. If the jet stream is north of Labrador, the controller at the Moncton air traffic control center needs communication to pilots in that remote area. Because the northern area have very little "reliable" audio lines satellite communication does the trick. When the controller talks to an pilot his audio leave the control center through the satellite system. The signal at the satellite is retransmitted back to earth. At the remote site the satellite receiving equipment sends the audio to a transmitting site. The site can then transmit the audio to the pilot. The transmitting station has a range of 150 miles. When the pilot talk to the controller the process is reverse.
So let's get this straight.
The air traffic controller bounces his signal off the satellite and that reaches the plane in the air and then the plane in the air then sends that signal back by bouncing it off of the same satellite and back to the controller. Is this correct?

No. read it again. CAREFULLY

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #93 on: February 27, 2014, 05:38:32 AM »
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish.
Just for starters, they aren't dishes, they are parabolas, and are highly directional.

Millions of people live on the coast of the ocean and many of them have parabolas pointing at the sky above the ocean.
If you give a nudge to the parabola the signal get lost, and you get it back if you re-align the parabola exactly as it was before. No towers at all in the middle of the ocean.
Well then, what are they pointing at? Answer please.
Look along the coast and you'll find plenty of transmitters. Your dish is a dish for a reason. Understand that.
Transmitters for what?

The dish is parabola shaped for maximum gain.  It receives from a satellite in the sky.
Transmitters for your TV, you know, the SKY TV you watch that are recieving the signal from ground based transmitters that your dish catches.
It's a dish for a reason or a parabola, whichever you want to call it now. I mean I don't hear many people saying " Oh, they're coming to install my new parabola tomorrow" do you?

We all know what a TV dish is and we all know it's to catch a direct signal that the dish can catch once it's angled in the general direction of a transmitter.
As you cannot give transmitter locations or explain why dishes on the coast point south over the sea I wonder what you skills are.

Parabola is the mathematical shape.  It is not the general direction, they have to be accirately aligned.
They have to be aligned in the general direction. I already said that.
It's a dish, it's easier to use and covers the exact same explanation.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #94 on: February 27, 2014, 05:41:18 AM »
The satellite TV dish on my roof points North, at an elevation angle of 54 from horizontal. It is VERY directional; moving it 1 off-target will result in total loss of reception. This means that any tower would have to be placed North of me, and be twice as high as it

was far away (ie a tower 1 mile away would have to be almost 2 miles tall). The tallest tower near where I live is 40km to the East, and a relative altitude of approximately 1km. So what's my dish p
ointing at?
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish. All it has to do is catch the signal at whatever transmitter is around, so yours like everyone elses will be coming from the nearest relay to you.
Transmitters aren't just confined to a few miles away. If you look around you, you will see one. You may not believe it's transmitting anything to you but then again, if satellites are shrouded, then nobody is going to tell you what's really going on, are they.

Why don't you look up how many supposed satellites are covering the whole of the UK and see what you think.

You have no training or degree in this field. I DO!! Yes it is a dish but not a like a butterfly net. It works by reflecting signals to a focal point. Think of it as a electronic telescope. Signal from the side will not be reflected to the amplifier inside the dish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_antenna. Don't make claims you know nothing about.
Don't profess to be an expert and then stick wiki up for me to look at.  ;)

I worked with satellite systems for many years. Our dish was 15ft in diameter. It was directed to an communication satellite (anik) so air traffic controllers can communicate to remote sites to increase radio coverage.
What remote sites do these air traffic controllers have to cover?
The air space in the east coast of Canada is very large. It covers areas in Labrador.  Airlines follow the jet stream to save fuel. If the jet stream is north of Labrador, the controller at the Moncton air traffic control center needs communication to pilots in that remote area. Because the northern area have very little "reliable" audio lines satellite communication does the trick. When the controller talks to an pilot his audio leave the control center through the satellite system. The signal at the satellite is retransmitted back to earth. At the remote site the satellite receiving equipment sends the audio to a transmitting site. The site can then transmit the audio to the pilot. The transmitting station has a range of 150 miles. When the pilot talk to the controller the process is reverse.
So let's get this straight.
The air traffic controller bounces his signal off the satellite and that reaches the plane in the air and then the plane in the air then sends that signal back by bouncing it off of the same satellite and back to the controller. Is this correct?

No. read it again. CAREFULLY
Ahh, ok, I see.
The air traffic controller sends his signal to the satellites and bouces that off to a ground transmitter near where the plane is and that bounces up to the plane, then back off the plane back down to the ground transmitter which beams back up to the satellite and bouces back to the air traffic controller. Is this right?

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #95 on: February 27, 2014, 05:44:10 AM »
The satellite TV dish on my roof points North, at an elevation angle of 54 from horizontal. It is VERY directional; moving it 1 off-target will result in total loss of reception. This means that any tower would have to be placed North of me, and be twice as high as it

was far away (ie a tower 1 mile away would have to be almost 2 miles tall). The tallest tower near where I live is 40km to the East, and a relative altitude of approximately 1km. So what's my dish p
ointing at?
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish. All it has to do is catch the signal at whatever transmitter is around, so yours like everyone elses will be coming from the nearest relay to you.
Transmitters aren't just confined to a few miles away. If you look around you, you will see one. You may not believe it's transmitting anything to you but then again, if satellites are shrouded, then nobody is going to tell you what's really going on, are they.

Why don't you look up how many supposed satellites are covering the whole of the UK and see what you think.

You have no training or degree in this field. I DO!! Yes it is a dish but not a like a butterfly net. It works by reflecting signals to a focal point. Think of it as a electronic telescope. Signal from the side will not be reflected to the amplifier inside the dish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_antenna. Don't make claims you know nothing about.
Don't profess to be an expert and then stick wiki up for me to look at.  ;)

I worked with satellite systems for many years. Our dish was 15ft in diameter. It was directed to an communication satellite (anik) so air traffic controllers can communicate to remote sites to increase radio coverage.
What remote sites do these air traffic controllers have to cover?
The air space in the east coast of Canada is very large. It covers areas in Labrador.  Airlines follow the jet stream to save fuel. If the jet stream is north of Labrador, the controller at the Moncton air traffic control center needs communication to pilots in that remote area. Because the northern area have very little "reliable" audio lines satellite communication does the trick. When the controller talks to an pilot his audio leave the control center through the satellite system. The signal at the satellite is retransmitted back to earth. At the remote site the satellite receiving equipment sends the audio to a transmitting site. The site can then transmit the audio to the pilot. The transmitting station has a range of 150 miles. When the pilot talk to the controller the process is reverse.
So let's get this straight.
The air traffic controller bounces his signal off the satellite and that reaches the plane in the air and then the plane in the air then sends that signal back by bouncing it off of the same satellite and back to the controller. Is this correct?

The remote station in Labrador receive the satellite signal and then retransmit it to the pilot.
controller to satellite(space)  then to ground station(ground) then to transmitter station on the ground to pilot in the sky.

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #96 on: February 27, 2014, 05:45:29 AM »
The satellite TV dish on my roof points North, at an elevation angle of 54 from horizontal. It is VERY directional; moving it 1 off-target will result in total loss of reception. This means that any tower would have to be placed North of me, and be twice as high as it

was far away (ie a tower 1 mile away would have to be almost 2 miles tall). The tallest tower near where I live is 40km to the East, and a relative altitude of approximately 1km. So what's my dish p
ointing at?
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish. All it has to do is catch the signal at whatever transmitter is around, so yours like everyone elses will be coming from the nearest relay to you.
Transmitters aren't just confined to a few miles away. If you look around you, you will see one. You may not believe it's transmitting anything to you but then again, if satellites are shrouded, then nobody is going to tell you what's really going on, are they.

Why don't you look up how many supposed satellites are covering the whole of the UK and see what you think.

You have no training or degree in this field. I DO!! Yes it is a dish but not a like a butterfly net. It works by reflecting signals to a focal point. Think of it as a electronic telescope. Signal from the side will not be reflected to the amplifier inside the dish http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parabolic_antenna. Don't make claims you know nothing about.
Don't profess to be an expert and then stick wiki up for me to look at.  ;)

I worked with satellite systems for many years. Our dish was 15ft in diameter. It was directed to an communication satellite (anik) so air traffic controllers can communicate to remote sites to increase radio coverage.
What remote sites do these air traffic controllers have to cover?
The air space in the east coast of Canada is very large. It covers areas in Labrador.  Airlines follow the jet stream to save fuel. If the jet stream is north of Labrador, the controller at the Moncton air traffic control center needs communication to pilots in that remote area. Because the northern area have very little "reliable" audio lines satellite communication does the trick. When the controller talks to an pilot his audio leave the control center through the satellite system. The signal at the satellite is retransmitted back to earth. At the remote site the satellite receiving equipment sends the audio to a transmitting site. The site can then transmit the audio to the pilot. The transmitting station has a range of 150 miles. When the pilot talk to the controller the process is reverse.
So let's get this straight.
The air traffic controller bounces his signal off the satellite and that reaches the plane in the air and then the plane in the air then sends that signal back by bouncing it off of the same satellite and back to the controller. Is this correct?

No. read it again. CAREFULLY
Ahh, ok, I see.
The air traffic controller sends his signal to the satellites and bouces that off to a ground transmitter near where the plane is and that bounces up to the plane, then back off the plane back down to the ground transmitter which beams back up to the satellite and bouces back to the air traffic controller. Is this right?
Perfect! you got it dude!

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #97 on: February 27, 2014, 05:49:35 AM »
That is the same method new networks use to communicate to remotes sites. They use dishes on their trucks to make the link to the satellite.

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #98 on: February 27, 2014, 05:53:35 AM »
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish.
Just for starters, they aren't dishes, they are parabolas, and are highly directional.

Millions of people live on the coast of the ocean and many of them have parabolas pointing at the sky above the ocean.
If you give a nudge to the parabola the signal get lost, and you get it back if you re-align the parabola exactly as it was before. No towers at all in the middle of the ocean.
Well then, what are they pointing at? Answer please.
Look along the coast and you'll find plenty of transmitters. Your dish is a dish for a reason. Understand that.
Transmitters for what?

The dish is parabola shaped for maximum gain.  It receives from a satellite in the sky.
Transmitters for your TV, you know, the SKY TV you watch that are recieving the signal from ground based transmitters that your dish catches.
It's a dish for a reason or a parabola, whichever you want to call it now. I mean I don't hear many people saying " Oh, they're coming to install my new parabola tomorrow" do you?

We all know what a TV dish is and we all know it's to catch a direct signal that the dish can catch once it's angled in the general direction of a transmitter.
As you cannot give transmitter locations or explain why dishes on the coast point south over the sea I wonder what you skills are.

Parabola is the mathematical shape.  It is not the general direction, they have to be accirately aligned.
They have to be aligned in the general direction. I already said that.
It's a dish, it's easier to use and covers the exact same explanation.
They are parabolic shaped dishes and have to be accurately set up in both the vertical and horizontal directions to point at particular satellite required.  As mentioned this is the same in any part of a country, the UK 'Sky TV' service uses a single group of satellites located at 28.2E which all dishes point at.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #99 on: February 27, 2014, 06:12:27 AM »
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish.
Just for starters, they aren't dishes, they are parabolas, and are highly directional.

Millions of people live on the coast of the ocean and many of them have parabolas pointing at the sky above the ocean.
If you give a nudge to the parabola the signal get lost, and you get it back if you re-align the parabola exactly as it was before. No towers at all in the middle of the ocean.
Well then, what are they pointing at? Answer please.
Look along the coast and you'll find plenty of transmitters. Your dish is a dish for a reason. Understand that.
Transmitters for what?

The dish is parabola shaped for maximum gain.  It receives from a satellite in the sky.
Transmitters for your TV, you know, the SKY TV you watch that are recieving the signal from ground based transmitters that your dish catches.
It's a dish for a reason or a parabola, whichever you want to call it now. I mean I don't hear many people saying " Oh, they're coming to install my new parabola tomorrow" do you?

We all know what a TV dish is and we all know it's to catch a direct signal that the dish can catch once it's angled in the general direction of a transmitter.
As you cannot give transmitter locations or explain why dishes on the coast point south over the sea I wonder what you skills are.

Parabola is the mathematical shape.  It is not the general direction, they have to be accirately aligned.
They have to be aligned in the general direction. I already said that.
It's a dish, it's easier to use and covers the exact same explanation.
They are parabolic shaped dishes and have to be accurately set up in both the vertical and horizontal directions to point at particular satellite required.  As mentioned this is the same in any part of a country, the UK 'Sky TV' service uses a single group of satellites located at 28.2E which all dishes point at.
Can you tell me tha names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #100 on: February 27, 2014, 06:15:36 AM »
It's a dish, it can be taking a signal from many angles that a transmitter is pointing to. That's why it's a dish.
Just for starters, they aren't dishes, they are parabolas, and are highly directional.

Millions of people live on the coast of the ocean and many of them have parabolas pointing at the sky above the ocean.
If you give a nudge to the parabola the signal get lost, and you get it back if you re-align the parabola exactly as it was before. No towers at all in the middle of the ocean.
Well then, what are they pointing at? Answer please.
Look along the coast and you'll find plenty of transmitters. Your dish is a dish for a reason. Understand that.
Transmitters for what?

The dish is parabola shaped for maximum gain.  It receives from a satellite in the sky.
Transmitters for your TV, you know, the SKY TV you watch that are recieving the signal from ground based transmitters that your dish catches.
It's a dish for a reason or a parabola, whichever you want to call it now. I mean I don't hear many people saying " Oh, they're coming to install my new parabola tomorrow" do you?

We all know what a TV dish is and we all know it's to catch a direct signal that the dish can catch once it's angled in the general direction of a transmitter.
As you cannot give transmitter locations or explain why dishes on the coast point south over the sea I wonder what you skills are.

Parabola is the mathematical shape.  It is not the general direction, they have to be accirately aligned.
They have to be aligned in the general direction. I already said that.
It's a dish, it's easier to use and covers the exact same explanation.
They are parabolic shaped dishes and have to be accurately set up in both the vertical and horizontal directions to point at particular satellite required.  As mentioned this is the same in any part of a country, the UK 'Sky TV' service uses a single group of satellites located at 28.2E which all dishes point at.
Can you tell me tha names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

PLEASE don't tell me your British?  I can understand American... or some ex communist country... but not British?!

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #101 on: February 27, 2014, 06:19:55 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #102 on: February 27, 2014, 06:24:12 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.
I was hoping you knew it all, you know, being the expert on all of this. I'd rather you tell me so I don't start making assumptions about this, then we can go from there.

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #103 on: February 27, 2014, 06:25:31 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.
I was hoping you knew it all, you know, being the expert on all of this. I'd rather you tell me so I don't start making assumptions about this, then we can go from there.

You making assumptions?! LOLOLOLOL!!

No, it would never happen..

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #104 on: February 27, 2014, 06:27:19 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.
I was hoping you knew it all, you know, being the expert on all of this. I'd rather you tell me so I don't start making assumptions about this, then we can go from there.

You making assumptions?! LOLOLOLOL!!

No, it would never happen..
We all make assumptions, Spanky. It's what makes the go around the world.

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #105 on: February 27, 2014, 06:39:41 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.
I was hoping you knew it all, you know, being the expert on all of this. I'd rather you tell me so I don't start making assumptions about this, then we can go from there.
Google Astra.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #106 on: February 27, 2014, 06:46:01 AM »
Can you tell me the names and amount of satellites that cover the UK just for TV.

Look it up.  let us know.
I was hoping you knew it all, you know, being the expert on all of this. I'd rather you tell me so I don't start making assumptions about this, then we can go from there.
Google Astra.
All I want to know is, how many satellites control the TV's of the whole of the UK, that's all I'm asking.
Just tell me what they are, as in all of the names and how many.

*

Salviati

  • 147
  • What is my Personal Text?
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #107 on: February 27, 2014, 07:02:16 AM »
Q: Why do you think the Earth is round?
A: Look out the window!

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #108 on: February 27, 2014, 07:04:16 AM »
All I want to know is, how many satellites control the TV's of the whole of the UK, that's all I'm asking.
Just tell me what they are, as in all of the names and how many.
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/align/align.html
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/astra.html
http://en.kingofsat.net/sat-astra2a.php
http://www.astra2.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astra_28.2%C2%B0E
http://www.lyngsat.com/packages/skyuk.html
http://www.ask.com/question/what-position-in-the-sky-is-the-astra-satellite

See for yourself the information you are interested in.
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.

*

Salviati

  • 147
  • What is my Personal Text?
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #109 on: February 27, 2014, 07:24:04 AM »
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.
I don't know, i'm not a satellite expert. Perhaps in one of those links there is the answer to your questio. I think these satellites are of the serie Astra, if you download the program WXtrack

http://www.satsignal.eu/software/wxtrack.htm

in his database it has several Astra satellites and you can see their position.

But seriously, if they are 3, 4, 5, 10 or 50 what's the difference?
Q: Why do you think the Earth is round?
A: Look out the window!

?

Starman

  • 3860
  • Never miss a day to learn something
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #110 on: February 27, 2014, 07:24:48 AM »
All I want to know is, how many satellites control the TV's of the whole of the UK, that's all I'm asking.
Just tell me what they are, as in all of the names and how many.
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/align/align.html
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/astra.html
http://en.kingofsat.net/sat-astra2a.php
http://www.astra2.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astra_28.2%C2%B0E
http://www.lyngsat.com/packages/skyuk.html
http://www.ask.com/question/what-position-in-the-sky-is-the-astra-satellite

See for yourself the information you are interested in.
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.
Who cares how many. There there and it works.

*

sceptimatic

  • Flat Earth Scientist
  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #111 on: February 27, 2014, 07:26:47 AM »
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.
I don't know, i'm not a satellite expert. Perhaps in one of those links there is the answer to your questio. I think these satellites are of the serie Astra, if you download the program WXtrack

http://www.satsignal.eu/software/wxtrack.htm

in his database it has several Astra satellites and you can see their position.

But seriously, if they are 3, 4, 5, 10 or 50 what's the difference?
I'll get to that when I find out how many of these satellites cover the UK as a whole.

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sceptimatic

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #112 on: February 27, 2014, 07:28:32 AM »
All I want to know is, how many satellites control the TV's of the whole of the UK, that's all I'm asking.
Just tell me what they are, as in all of the names and how many.
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/align/align.html
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/astra.html
http://en.kingofsat.net/sat-astra2a.php
http://www.astra2.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astra_28.2%C2%B0E
http://www.lyngsat.com/packages/skyuk.html
http://www.ask.com/question/what-position-in-the-sky-is-the-astra-satellite

See for yourself the information you are interested in.
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.
Who cares how many. There there and it works.
If you want to keep up the ruse that they're real then you need to tell me how many there are covering the full UK.
If not, it doesn't help your case.

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Starman

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #113 on: February 27, 2014, 07:34:19 AM »
All I want to know is, how many satellites control the TV's of the whole of the UK, that's all I'm asking.
Just tell me what they are, as in all of the names and how many.
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/align/align.html
http://www.brymar.co.uk/info/Astra/astra.html
http://en.kingofsat.net/sat-astra2a.php
http://www.astra2.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astra_28.2%C2%B0E
http://www.lyngsat.com/packages/skyuk.html
http://www.ask.com/question/what-position-in-the-sky-is-the-astra-satellite

See for yourself the information you are interested in.
Can you tell me how many satellites are used to cover the full UK. Just say how many there are.
Who cares how many. There there and it works.
If you want to keep up the ruse that they're real then you need to tell me how many there are covering the full UK.
If not, it doesn't help your case.

If I told you 5 your would you believe me? Besides the TV satellite are there to cover most of Europe. Take a look.http://robssatellitetv.com/eurotvreception.htm
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 07:41:41 AM by Starman »

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sceptimatic

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #114 on: February 27, 2014, 08:33:51 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.

?

Starman

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #115 on: February 27, 2014, 08:44:53 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.
I just showed you. Did you look at the link. It shows you at least 4 of them. Typical of FE to run away.

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Starman

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #116 on: February 27, 2014, 08:48:00 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.

Here it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Astra 1 at 19 degrees east
Eutelsat hotbird at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 at 5 degrees west
Eutelsat hotbird positioned at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 positioned at 5 degrees west

Is there any of this you can't understand?

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sceptimatic

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Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #117 on: February 27, 2014, 09:25:20 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.

Here it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Astra 1 at 19 degrees east
Eutelsat hotbird at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 at 5 degrees west
Eutelsat hotbird positioned at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 positioned at 5 degrees west

Is there any of this you can't understand?
Yes! We have two hotbirds in the same position...and two Eutelsats in the same position. Are they piggy backing or something or are they  Siamese twin like satellites. Help me out here.

It's a strange name to give 23,000 miles into space, satellites isn't it. BIRDS!

Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #118 on: February 27, 2014, 10:19:53 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.

Here it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Astra 1 at 19 degrees east
Eutelsat hotbird at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 at 5 degrees west
Eutelsat hotbird positioned at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 positioned at 5 degrees west

Is there any of this you can't understand?
Yes! We have two hotbirds in the same position...and two Eutelsats in the same position. Are they piggy backing or something or are they  Siamese twin like satellites. Help me out here.

It's a strange name to give 23,000 miles into space, satellites isn't it. BIRDS!
They provide the high number of tv and radio channels.  Multiple transmitters, called transponders, each with a narrow beam to limit coverage to particular area.

*

sceptimatic

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  • 28374
Re: How does Satellite TV Work?
« Reply #119 on: February 27, 2014, 10:27:00 AM »
Ok, so nobody knows how many satellites cover the whole of the UK and what they are called. I'll now deck out of this thread with a smile.

Here it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Astra 1 at 19 degrees east
Eutelsat hotbird at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 at 5 degrees west
Eutelsat hotbird positioned at 13 degrees east
Atlantic bird 3 positioned at 5 degrees west

Is there any of this you can't understand?
Yes! We have two hotbirds in the same position...and two Eutelsats in the same position. Are they piggy backing or something or are they  Siamese twin like satellites. Help me out here.

It's a strange name to give 23,000 miles into space, satellites isn't it. BIRDS!
They provide the high number of tv and radio channels.  Multiple transmitters, called transponders, each with a narrow beam to limit coverage to particular area.
How come I can get all the satellite channels through my ordinary roof aerial?