Problem with the Sun

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Problem with the Sun
« on: November 11, 2013, 08:03:44 PM »
According to FET, the Sun shines down on Earth like a spotlight.  And I think we can all agree that the Sun emits light, correct?  And we know that anything that emits light (light bulbs, TVs), emits it in ALL directions.  Then why doesn't the Sun, an emitter of light, emit it in all directions according to FET?

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11cookeaw1

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2013, 08:33:08 PM »
Perspective, optical illusion, bendy light, the atmosphere blocks it. Those are the answers that you will likely get here. Welcome to the flat earth forum, where evidence is ignored and look out your window is a logical argument.

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2013, 08:35:22 PM »
Perspective, optical illusion, bendy light, the atmosphere blocks it. Those are the answers that you will likely get here. Welcome to the flat earth forum, where evidence is ignored and look out your window is a logical argument.
One of the best summations of this site I've seen.  I salute you.

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Junker

  • 3926
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2013, 08:36:14 PM »
Perspective, optical illusion, bendy light, the atmosphere blocks it. Those are the answers that you will likely get here. Welcome to the flat earth forum, where evidence is ignored and look out your window is a logical argument.

May I ask why you bother posting, then?  You clearly have everything figured out, it seems like you are wasting your time.

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2013, 08:37:42 PM »
Perspective, optical illusion, bendy light, the atmosphere blocks it. Those are the answers that you will likely get here. Welcome to the flat earth forum, where evidence is ignored and look out your window is a logical argument.

May I ask why you bother posting, then?  You clearly have everything figured out, it seems like you are wasting your time.

Okay, seriously then.  Can you answer my original question?

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Junker

  • 3926
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2013, 08:39:29 PM »
Perspective, optical illusion, bendy light, the atmosphere blocks it. Those are the answers that you will likely get here. Welcome to the flat earth forum, where evidence is ignored and look out your window is a logical argument.

May I ask why you bother posting, then?  You clearly have everything figured out, it seems like you are wasting your time.

Okay, seriously then.  Can you answer my original question?

Absolutely, but it seems you aren't interested in FE answers.  This topic has been covered many times.  We can re-hash it all again, or you can do a search.  Failing that, I could provide some links for you.

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2013, 08:43:00 PM »
The search just comes up with my own thread.  But could you please offer your own explanation?

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Junker

  • 3926
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2013, 08:45:07 PM »
The search just comes up with my own thread.  But could you please offer your own explanation?

That is absolutely not true.  Try searching "spotlight sun" and maybe take more than 30 seconds reviewing the results.  Please do a little of your own work first.

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2013, 08:47:58 PM »
The search just comes up with my own thread.  But could you please offer your own explanation?

That is absolutely not true.  Try searching "spotlight sun" and maybe take more than 30 seconds reviewing the results.  Please do a little of your own work first.

I'm sorry, but it only comes up with one result: my thread.  Anyways, could you please give an explanation to my OP?

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MrKappa

  • 448
  • Math abstracts reality... it does not create it...
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2013, 02:43:09 AM »
It does emit light in all directions and it casts hard rather than diffuse shadows, that is how strong and sharp the light is.

Anyways, I might as well drop this bomb on you...

http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/investigations/es2603/es2603page01.cfm

Quote
the sun actually grows and shrinks over a period of one year

The answer is clear...

Now if you want to start questioning whether or not the Sun is Flat or Round, it makes no difference if light is cast in all directions (OmniDirectional). Additionally the shape of the light source, it being spherical or flat, is irrelevant as to whether it casts light uni-directionally, or omni-directionally. For all practical purposes, it only needs to cast uni-directionally, and theoretically, it can cast omni-directionally, the source light being any shape, will still cast light upon the earth in the same manner as a spot light would.

Man you are dumb, whether you believe in flat earth or round earth, OP.

Go back to grade school.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 02:53:27 AM by MrKappa »

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dephelis

  • 479
  • Sine scientia ars nihil est.
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2013, 07:06:18 AM »
It does emit light in all directions and it casts hard rather than diffuse shadows, that is how strong and sharp the light is.

Anyways, I might as well drop this bomb on you...

http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/investigations/es2603/es2603page01.cfm

Quote
the sun actually grows and shrinks over a period of one year

The answer is clear...

Now if you want to start questioning whether or not the Sun is Flat or Round, it makes no difference if light is cast in all directions (OmniDirectional). Additionally the shape of the light source, it being spherical or flat, is irrelevant as to whether it casts light uni-directionally, or omni-directionally. For all practical purposes, it only needs to cast uni-directionally, and theoretically, it can cast omni-directionally, the source light being any shape, will still cast light upon the earth in the same manner as a spot light would.

Man you are dumb, whether you believe in flat earth or round earth, OP.

Go back to grade school.

Good to see you're not misrepresenting your source with biased and selective quoting there MrKappa.

Quote
Consider these two possible explanations for the changing size of the sun:
  • either the sun actually grows and shrinks over a period of one year, or
  • the distance from Earth to the sun changes, causing the sun to appear to change size.

All stars change size over their lifetimes, but the sun is currently very stable. Evidence indicates the sun has a constant diameter of about 1.4 million kilometers. The only reasonable explanation for the change in the sun's apparent size is that Earth's distance from the sun changes in a regular pattern.

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2013, 09:32:00 AM »
Now if you want to start questioning whether or not the Sun is Flat or Round, it makes no difference if light is cast in all directions (OmniDirectional). Additionally the shape of the light source, it being spherical or flat, is irrelevant as to whether it casts light uni-directionally, or omni-directionally. For all practical purposes, it only needs to cast uni-directionally, and theoretically, it can cast omni-directionally, the source light being any shape, will still cast light upon the earth in the same manner as a spot light would.
So how does a flat disk, when viewed from an angle, appear round?

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2013, 11:33:17 AM »
Now if you want to start questioning whether or not the Sun is Flat or Round, it makes no difference if light is cast in all directions (OmniDirectional). Additionally the shape of the light source, it being spherical or flat, is irrelevant as to whether it casts light uni-directionally, or omni-directionally. For all practical purposes, it only needs to cast uni-directionally, and theoretically, it can cast omni-directionally, the source light being any shape, will still cast light upon the earth in the same manner as a spot light would.
So how does a flat disk, when viewed from an angle, appear round?

I have a problem with this as well. If the sun is a disk, and as close to us as is believed in standard FET, then it couldn't possible appear as a circle to everyone on the earth who can simultaneously see it, as they are separated by thousands of miles hence viewing it at a different angle.

To account for this, we must invoke atmospheric scattering effects or something like that. The question is whether these atmospheric effects can simultaneously describe the constant circular appearance of the sun as well as its appearance of sinking below the disk at sunset. This would need to be shown to be possible, and it is a discrepancy we must address until it is.

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MrKappa

  • 448
  • Math abstracts reality... it does not create it...
Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2013, 01:11:26 AM »
Sure it wouldn't look the same in the sky or through a telescope but it WILL cast light in the same manner as a spotlight.

Let's stay on topic and address one item at a time, the OP has asked a specific question about the direction in which light travels.


Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2013, 07:11:54 AM »
Sure it wouldn't look the same in the sky or through a telescope but it WILL cast light in the same manner as a spotlight.

Let's stay on topic and address one item at a time, the OP has asked a specific question about the direction in which light travels.

In that case, I request evidence for your claim: "the source light being any shape, will still cast light upon the earth in the same manner as a spot light would."

I can imagine many geometries for the Sun that would not cast light upon the Earth in the same manner as a spotlight. One, for example, would be if the Sun was shaped like a long, thin tube. Another would be a torus. In fact, there are quite few geometries that WOULD work. And it would certainly matter if the light was uni- or omni-directional. Simply take a flashlight, and put in front of it a piece of paper with some shape cut out of it -- so that the light only shines through the shape's hole in the paper. Now shine it on the table. Obviously, the shape of light it makes on the table will vary dependent on the shape cut out of the paper.

Hence, I have direct, observational evidence that contradicts your claim. Ironically, playing with scissors and paper and flashlights is something one might do in grade school -- so your earlier suggestion for another member to go back there was a good one!

Re: Problem with the Sun
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2013, 09:42:39 AM »
Sure it wouldn't look the same in the sky or through a telescope but it WILL cast light in the same manner as a spotlight.

Let's stay on topic and address one item at a time, the OP has asked a specific question about the direction in which light travels.
Looks like a sphere to me, same through a zoomed in camera, binoculars, and a telescope. 

Emits light evenly in every direction viewable from the ground (excluding obvious additional angled distance through air earlier in morning and later in afternoon)

What part of that represents a spotlight?

Discussing uni-directional (spotlight) and omni-directional (sphere) sunlight and visible evidence for each seem pretty on topic relating to the OP's question to me.