Can anyone answer this question.

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #90 on: October 15, 2013, 12:06:05 PM »
Scepti- why and how can you be under the impression that light cannot propagate in a vacuum, while at the same time you say that nothing can stop light in a vacuum?

YOU can't have it both ways.


I don't profess to be correct.
Quote from: sceptimatic
I am correct.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #91 on: October 15, 2013, 12:06:21 PM »
Quote
So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?

It's a conspiracy.

You actually can hear it but you've been brainwashed not to.

Really!

And your heart need to be washed.
Life is a big trick.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #92 on: October 15, 2013, 12:17:44 PM »
Quote
The earth is the earth and the sky is the sky and that's it.

Where do meteors that crash to the earth come from?
The dome and the centre of earth.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #93 on: October 15, 2013, 12:20:19 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #94 on: October 15, 2013, 12:23:18 PM »
Quote
The dome and the centre of earth.


So how come we can observe meteors passing by the earth in a telescope.

Or observe meteor showers with our bare eyes?

Explain Haley's comet for me.
You did not ask me for logic.  You asked for my opinion. - Jroa

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #95 on: October 15, 2013, 12:26:56 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.
Are you saying the sight and sound are reaching me at the same time, but one takes longer to register in my brain?

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #96 on: October 15, 2013, 12:27:17 PM »
Scepti- why and how can you be under the impression that light cannot propagate in a vacuum, while at the same time you say that nothing can stop light in a vacuum?

YOU can't have it both ways.
Because if you take the time to read, you will see that I'm using YOUR vacuum as you see it working and turning it against you.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #97 on: October 15, 2013, 12:32:36 PM »
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The dome and the centre of earth.


So how come we can observe meteors passing by the earth in a telescope.
Why wouldn't you observe what you believe are meteors? They're just mixed element icicles turning back into gas as they hit denser gases. That's why they have tails, they are turning back into gases aided by temperature increases and decreases.
Or observe meteor showers with our bare eyes?
Same thing just breaking up.
Explain Haley's comet for me.
Haleys comet is just a similar thing just larger and slower in disintegration of the lightest elements.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #98 on: October 15, 2013, 12:36:17 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.
Are you saying the sight and sound are reaching me at the same time, but one takes longer to register in my brain?
Nope.

I'm saying that your eyes see the result of , for instance: lightning before the sound reaches your ears.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #99 on: October 15, 2013, 12:57:12 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.
Are you saying the sight and sound are reaching me at the same time, but one takes longer to register in my brain?
Nope.

I'm saying that your eyes see the result of , for instance: lightning before the sound reaches your ears.
The further away a lighting strike is, the longer it takes to hear it.  If light is the end product of sound, then why does it take longer to hear something after seeing it the further away it is?

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #100 on: October 15, 2013, 01:06:24 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.
Are you saying the sight and sound are reaching me at the same time, but one takes longer to register in my brain?
Nope.

I'm saying that your eyes see the result of , for instance: lightning before the sound reaches your ears.

Again, I ask, if light is a 'form' of sound, why does it propagate faster than sound? Why does it not propagate where sound does, and vice versa?

Also, you seem to be thinking of the sun and stars as focused spotlights, which they are not. They are throwing light in all directions, and only tiny infinitesimal amounts of that light actually point at earth.

Lastly, the night sky isn't black. Oftentimes, it is many different colors.

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rottingroom

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #101 on: October 15, 2013, 01:09:24 PM »
You know scepti. You are not the first person to think of any of these problems. For instance how light propagates in a mediumless field. This was always a problem in physics and was in fact why the hypothesis of the aether came up in the history of science. Unfortunately we never found the aether and the hypothesis died off after experimental verification found that light creates its own medium. This stuff is not made up. You can say it is all you want but the more you do the more ignorant you appear.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #102 on: October 15, 2013, 01:58:48 PM »
Why does it not propagate where sound does, and vice versa?
Something I myself forgot to ask.

Also, you seem to be thinking of the sun and stars as focused spotlights, which they are not. They are throwing light in all directions, and only tiny infinitesimal amounts of that light actually point at earth.
I think scepti is talking about the light coming off the star at angles (thus allowing us to see the edges of a star, along with the side directly facing us) and since the star is bigger than Earth, the same wall of light/energy we'd receive close up from those "parallel rays", should also be received far away.

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g el

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #103 on: October 15, 2013, 02:09:50 PM »
About sound and light:

Do you expect a photo sensor and a microphone to register light and sound at the same time from a lighting/thunder? also do you expect to be able to capture sound using a photo-sensor? you know this might save a lot of resources, either that or capturing light using microphones..

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rottingroom

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #104 on: October 15, 2013, 02:13:19 PM »
Why does it not propagate where sound does, and vice versa?
Something I myself forgot to ask.

Also, you seem to be thinking of the sun and stars as focused spotlights, which they are not. They are throwing light in all directions, and only tiny infinitesimal amounts of that light actually point at earth.
I think scepti is talking about the light coming off the star at angles (thus allowing us to see the edges of a star, along with the side directly facing us) and since the star is bigger than Earth, the same wall of light/energy we'd receive close up from those "parallel rays", should also be received far away.

Yes we can see those photons on the sides but we don't feel the radiation from them.

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11cookeaw1

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #105 on: October 15, 2013, 06:13:59 PM »
Light is the end product of sound. It cannot propagate unless it has matter to do so, it's impossible and should be logical to comprehend that.

So why can I see something happen in the distance, and not hear it until several seconds have passed?
Because your eyes can see reflections quicker than your ears can hear them.
Just like you can see a punch before you feel it.
But when the source is close by I can hear and see them at the same time.

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11cookeaw1

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #106 on: October 15, 2013, 06:22:44 PM »
so we should basically see an earth blanket of sun, not a small disc.
The entire sky should be filled with the sun no matter which way we look?  Is that what you're saying?

Objects appear smaller the further away they are, regardless if they're viewed through atmosphere, 1/10 atmosphere, 1/1000 atmosphere, or vacuum.
Inside earth you see stuff from a distance which looks smaller, fair enough, no problem there. That's because our eyesight cannot magnify as we move away to keep an object the same size, plus the atmosphere would obscure it, eventually.

A strong torch shining into your eyes whilst you back away from it, will become smaller as the reflected light becomes less intense due to atmosphere density over distance.

The way your so called vacuum is described with your huge sun and stars, they do not suffer this problem until they hit earths atmosphere from however many trillions of miles, meaning they should hit with the intensity from which they started emitting in this direction, which would bathe the earth and would not give us any chance of seeing them as any kind of dot that we see now.
Nope, a few meters of air can't really obscure anything.

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #107 on: October 15, 2013, 06:47:18 PM »
Scepti- why and how can you be under the impression that light cannot propagate in a vacuum, while at the same time you say that nothing can stop light in a vacuum?

YOU can't have it both ways.
Because if you take the time to read, you will see that I'm using YOUR vacuum as you see it working and turning it against you.
I read every post so far.
I see no evidence in favor of you.
I see nothing being used against me.
Vain, uneducated, struggling attempts to do so, on the other hand, are ever plenty.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 06:49:06 PM by th3rm0m3t3r0 »


I don't profess to be correct.
Quote from: sceptimatic
I am correct.

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Scintific Method

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #108 on: October 15, 2013, 06:50:34 PM »
Why does it not propagate where sound does, and vice versa?
Something I myself forgot to ask.

Also, you seem to be thinking of the sun and stars as focused spotlights, which they are not. They are throwing light in all directions, and only tiny infinitesimal amounts of that light actually point at earth.
I think scepti is talking about the light coming off the star at angles (thus allowing us to see the edges of a star, along with the side directly facing us) and since the star is bigger than Earth, the same wall of light/energy we'd receive close up from those "parallel rays", should also be received far away.

Yes we can see those photons on the sides but we don't feel the radiation from them.

Actually, we do. The energy they carry reaches us, whether that energy be visible light, IR (heat), UV or whatever. The reason we aren't getting cooked is that we only receive the energy from the photons that came in this direction, which is a relatively small portion of the total number of photons emitted. Actually, if I can chuck in some more numbers, the earth only receives 4.5x10-10% (if I got my maths right this time ;) ) of the total energy output from the sun, because all the rest of that energy has gone off in other directions. Even that tiny amount of energy is quite powerful though; it's a common occurrence for the bitumen on the roads to melt during summer in my home town, and that's 30 South of the equator!

Oh, and keep in mind, that 4.5x10-10% of the sun's total energy output is spread over the ~255,000,000km2 of the earth's surface that is exposed to the sun at any one time, so the bit that we feel on our ~1m2 of exposed skin (if we're average build and not wearing any clothes) really is a very tiny proportion of the total output (about 1.8x10-24%).
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 07:10:21 PM by Scintific Method »
Quote from: jtelroy
...the FE'ers still found a way to deny it. Not with counter arguments. Not with proof of any kind. By simply denying it.

"Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all doubt."

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #109 on: October 16, 2013, 02:18:41 AM »
Actually, we do. The energy they carry reaches us, whether that energy be visible light, IR (heat), UV or whatever. The reason we aren't getting cooked is that we only receive the energy from the photons that came in this direction, which is a relatively small portion of the total number of photons emitted. Actually, if I can chuck in some more numbers, the earth only receives 4.5x10-10% (if I got my maths right this time ;) ) of the total energy output from the sun, because all the rest of that energy has gone off in other directions. Even that tiny amount of energy is quite powerful though; it's a common occurrence for the bitumen on the roads to melt during summer in my home town, and that's 30 South of the equator!

Oh, and keep in mind, that 4.5x10-10% of the sun's total energy output is spread over the ~255,000,000km2 of the earth's surface that is exposed to the sun at any one time, so the bit that we feel on our ~1m2 of exposed skin (if we're average build and not wearing any clothes) really is a very tiny proportion of the total output (about 1.8x10-24%).
Actually you also need to account the fact that atmosphere reflects or absorbs some of the energy from the sun. Without it, the world would be a lot hotter place.

I think, therefore I am

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Scintific Method

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #110 on: October 16, 2013, 02:28:00 AM »
Actually, we do. The energy they carry reaches us, whether that energy be visible light, IR (heat), UV or whatever. The reason we aren't getting cooked is that we only receive the energy from the photons that came in this direction, which is a relatively small portion of the total number of photons emitted. Actually, if I can chuck in some more numbers, the earth only receives 4.5x10-10% (if I got my maths right this time ;) ) of the total energy output from the sun, because all the rest of that energy has gone off in other directions. Even that tiny amount of energy is quite powerful though; it's a common occurrence for the bitumen on the roads to melt during summer in my home town, and that's 30 South of the equator!

Oh, and keep in mind, that 4.5x10-10% of the sun's total energy output is spread over the ~255,000,000km2 of the earth's surface that is exposed to the sun at any one time, so the bit that we feel on our ~1m2 of exposed skin (if we're average build and not wearing any clothes) really is a very tiny proportion of the total output (about 1.8x10-24%).
Actually you also need to account the fact that atmosphere reflects or absorbs some of the energy from the sun. Without it, the world would be a lot hotter place.



Very true, I had forgotten that!
Quote from: jtelroy
...the FE'ers still found a way to deny it. Not with counter arguments. Not with proof of any kind. By simply denying it.

"Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all doubt."

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #111 on: October 16, 2013, 07:32:43 AM »
I'll explain why I'm asking after some people have answered.

Let's assume that the earth is what you roundies say it is and everything is how you say it is, EXCEPT, the sun.
Instead of the sun being as big as it is, let us assume that the sun is only 20,000 miles in diameter. How much of the earth would it light up as opposed to what it's supposed to be doing right now?

Smart question, don't expect an answer. I thought of it. It has its own formula depending on three factors: height, size and strength of the illuminant. With these you can get the lighted space around it.
Life is a big trick.

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rottingroom

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #112 on: October 16, 2013, 07:34:46 AM »
He got tons of answers. Your ignorance is palpable.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #113 on: October 16, 2013, 07:39:53 AM »
He got tons of answers. Your ignorance is palpable.

Your ugly pic reflects your ugly words.
Life is a big trick.

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rottingroom

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #114 on: October 16, 2013, 07:47:00 AM »
People often think ignorance is a derogatory term. It is simply a word that describes someone who doesn't know anything about a subject. It is a quantifiable assessment. You, Spaceship and Scepti are ignorant about this stuff. It isn't meant to hurt your feelings, it is a fact verified by the things you say.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #115 on: October 16, 2013, 07:53:07 AM »
People often think ignorance is a derogatory term. It is simply a word that describes someone who doesn't know anything about a subject. It is a quantifiable assessment. You, Spaceship and Scepti are ignorant about this stuff. It isn't meant to hurt your feelings, it is a fact verified by the things you say.

Who's house made of glass, doesn't throw people with stones.

There could be tens of answers but all not related or wrong. I say he will not get the correct answer because who knows the answer for sure knows that the earth is flat.

Take care of your pic.
Life is a big trick.

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rottingroom

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #116 on: October 16, 2013, 07:56:31 AM »
My pic is fine. Your username and pic make me want to vomit but that's OK.

Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #117 on: October 16, 2013, 07:58:40 AM »
My pic is fine. Your username and pic make me want to vomit but that's OK.

Vomit, I don't mind specially if you've just eaten pork.
Life is a big trick.

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th3rm0m3t3r0

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #118 on: October 16, 2013, 08:06:12 AM »
People often think ignorance is a derogatory term. It is simply a word that describes someone who doesn't know anything about a subject. It is a quantifiable assessment. You, Spaceship and Scepti are ignorant about this stuff. It isn't meant to hurt your feelings, it is a fact verified by the things you say.

Who's house made of glass, doesn't throw people with stones.

There could be tens of answers but all not related or wrong. I say he will not get the correct answer because who knows the answer for sure knows that the earth is flat.

Take care of your pic.

How were any of the answers not related or wrong?
I think a bunch of people answered all of his questions pretty concisely.
I think it is you who resides in the glass house.

Besides, he's right. Scepti has shown a few times in this thread alone that he has no idea what he is talking about.
That, or he refuses to even try to comprehend anything other than what he knows.
Both are equally as terrible.


I don't profess to be correct.
Quote from: sceptimatic
I am correct.

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sceptimatic

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Re: Can anyone answer this question.
« Reply #119 on: October 16, 2013, 08:12:03 AM »
People often think ignorance is a derogatory term. It is simply a word that describes someone who doesn't know anything about a subject. It is a quantifiable assessment. You, Spaceship and Scepti are ignorant about this stuff. It isn't meant to hurt your feelings, it is a fact verified by the things you say.

Who's house made of glass, doesn't throw people with stones.

There could be tens of answers but all not related or wrong. I say he will not get the correct answer because who knows the answer for sure knows that the earth is flat.

Take care of your pic.

How were any of the answers not related or wrong?
I think a bunch of people answered all of his questions pretty concisely.
I think it is you who resides in the glass house.

Besides, he's right. Scepti has shown a few times in this thread alone that he has no idea what he is talking about.
That, or he refuses to even try to comprehend anything other than what he knows.
Both are equally as terrible.
None of us know for absolute sure what we are talking about in the reality world, we have to go on the most logical thoughts about what reality is.
Being able to add up and subtract and do equations does not make a person state fact about what they believe is in space, it's simply a commitment to memory from books and what not.
Deny it if you want, but I'm telling you the truth.