Ocean on Flat Earth

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Ocean on Flat Earth
« on: May 11, 2013, 04:57:52 PM »
Alright here is another one! If the ice walls "antarctica" the land around the earth is holding back the oceans from flowing away from the earth. What is holding the air onto the disc?
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Junker

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2013, 06:12:27 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2013, 06:33:48 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.
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DuckDodgers

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2013, 06:39:59 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.

Think of the UA as a moving liquid.  When it moves past the disk of the Earth, it continues to move forward and starts to move back towards the center, and eventually meeting back together at some point above the Earth.  Of course, this is only possible in the finite FET, not the infinite FET.  This wall of moving UA maintains the atmosphere above the Earth.
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?
Magnetism for one and electric is the other.

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Junker

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2013, 06:41:43 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.

I haven't read anywhere that DE behaves as you describe, other than pushing the earth "upward."  The DE enshrouds the circumference of the earth and exists below it, accelerating earth to 9.81m/s^2 and holding in the atmoplane.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2013, 06:50:38 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.

I haven't read anywhere that DE behaves as you describe, other than pushing the earth "upward."  The DE enshrouds the circumference of the earth and exists below it, accelerating earth to 9.81m/s^2 and holding in the atmoplane.

Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right? Then what prevents the air from spreading over the rest of space, since there is no force constantly pushing it inwards and there are no walls of any sort.
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Junker

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2013, 07:07:49 PM »
Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right?

I don't believe that is the case.  It extends above the horizon which is how it holds in the atmoplane.  It is theoretically explorable, but it is thought that temperatures are near absolute zero.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2013, 07:09:36 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.

Think of the UA as a moving liquid.  When it moves past the disk of the Earth, it continues to move forward and starts to move back towards the center, and eventually meeting back together at some point above the Earth.  Of course, this is only possible in the finite FET, not the infinite FET.  This wall of moving UA maintains the atmosphere above the Earth.

It cannot possibly move faster than the earth as it is a constant 9.81 m/s upward force. Therefore it cannot possibly stack up the air
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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2013, 07:15:51 PM »
Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right?

I don't believe that is the case.  It extends above the horizon which is how it holds in the atmoplane.  It is theoretically explorable, but it is thought that temperatures are near absolute zero.

So it extends above the horizon, but it is not an inwards force? Am I right?
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Junker

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2013, 07:23:30 PM »
Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right?

I don't believe that is the case.  It extends above the horizon which is how it holds in the atmoplane.  It is theoretically explorable, but it is thought that temperatures are near absolute zero.

So it extends above the horizon, but it is not an inwards force? Am I right?

I am not sure what you mean by "inwards" force.

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Rama Set

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2013, 07:59:35 PM »
Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right?

I don't believe that is the case.  It extends above the horizon which is how it holds in the atmoplane.  It is theoretically explorable, but it is thought that temperatures are near absolute zero.

So it extends above the horizon, but it is not an inwards force? Am I right?

I am not sure what you mean by "inwards" force.

Dark Energy in this hypothesis seems to prefer to push towards the plane of the Earth.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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DuckDodgers

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2013, 08:22:45 PM »
The commonly accepted theory is that the same dark energy that drives the UA is what holds the atmoplane in.  I would have to search more as I haven't reviewed the topic in quite some time, and I don't believe all flat earth theorists subscribe to this.

So dark energy is pushing in any direction, whatever object it encounters. I also read that in the wiki. Below th earth it pushes upward, from the side it moves inwards, then...from the top it pushes downward and you are stuck with an unmovable earth and you no longer have a force what RE explain as gravity acting on earth. Everything just grinds to a halt for the FET.

Think of the UA as a moving liquid.  When it moves past the disk of the Earth, it continues to move forward and starts to move back towards the center, and eventually meeting back together at some point above the Earth.  Of course, this is only possible in the finite FET, not the infinite FET.  This wall of moving UA maintains the atmosphere above the Earth.

It cannot possibly move faster than the earth as it is a constant 9.81 m/s upward force. Therefore it cannot possibly stack up the air

It accelerates the Earth, with all it's mass upward at 9.81 m/s, so with no mass in it's path, it would of course move faster.

Don't get the wrong impression, I think UA is a load of junk to attempt to explain away gravity so that gravity doesn't force the Earth into a sphere.  But there are just some arguments you have to concede to as the very basics of quite a few of the FE theories are sensible, its when you get into the grit of the theories that they look weird.
markjo, what force can not pass through a solid or liquid?
Magnetism for one and electric is the other.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2013, 06:05:52 AM »
Ok so DE only exists below the horizon, am I right?

I don't believe that is the case.  It extends above the horizon which is how it holds in the atmoplane.  It is theoretically explorable, but it is thought that temperatures are near absolute zero.

So it extends above the horizon, but it is not an inwards force? Am I right?

I am not sure what you mean by "inwards" force.

A force, pushing towards the center. And inward force.
Hello!

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2013, 06:24:46 AM »

It accelerates the Earth, with all it's mass upward at 9.81 m/s, so with no mass in it's path, it would of course move faster.

Don't get the wrong impression, I think UA is a load of junk to attempt to explain away gravity so that gravity doesn't force the Earth into a sphere.  But there are just some arguments you have to concede to as the very basics of quite a few of the FE theories are sensible, its when you get into the grit of the theories that they look weird.

You see the dark energy, responsible for pushing the earth upwards at 9.81 m/s as it comes across resistance. As you might well know, the earth moves in a vacuum. All objects, no matter what mass, move at the same rate in a vacuum. So even if there is some DE pushing the earth upwards, it cannot overtake itself.

In fact, if the forces on the outside move at a higher speed than the earth, it will even take the air with it, away from the earth. There is nothing preventing the air from horizontal disperse.

See my image for better understanding.

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Rama Set

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2013, 07:28:05 AM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2013, 12:55:57 PM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2013, 04:45:52 PM »
Alright here is another one! If the ice walls "antarctica" the land around the earth is holding back the oceans from flowing away from the earth. What is holding the air onto the disc?


The ice wall does not hold any oceans? Our oceans and continents are just a tiny feature of a much greater infinite earth. Think of our oceans as a giant lake. Think of our continents as island on that lake, this is more accurate picture.
JJA voted for Pedro

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Rama Set

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2013, 05:16:31 PM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Everything would freeze. There is no element with a melting point below absolute zero.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2013, 05:26:12 PM »
The UA must hold the air in place.

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Rama Set

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2013, 05:32:19 PM »
The UA must hold the air in place.

Why must it?  That sounds like wishful thinking.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2013, 05:54:21 PM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Everything would freeze. There is no element with a melting point below absolute zero.

The gasses would not be going directly from room temperature to absolute zero.  They would turn to liquids or solids when the temperature got low enough before reaching absolute zero.

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robintex

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2013, 06:27:27 PM »
Alright here is another one! If the ice walls "antarctica" the land around the earth is holding back the oceans from flowing away from the earth. What is holding the air onto the disc?

I would have to review the FE Theory and I may be wrong, but I thought it is the canopy that is  holding the air onto the disc ?
Stick close , very close , to your P.C.and never go to sea
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

Look out your window , see what you shall see
And you all may be Rulers of The Flat Earth Society

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Puttah

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2013, 07:46:26 PM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Everything would freeze. There is no element with a melting point below absolute zero.

The gasses would not be going directly from room temperature to absolute zero.  They would turn to liquids or solids when the temperature got low enough before reaching absolute zero.

That would cool down our Earth dramatically. All those millions of tons of air being super-cooled to liquid temperatures and being recycled warmed up back towards the centre...
Scepti, this idiocy needs to stop and it needs to stop right now. You are making a mockery of this fine forum with your poor trolling. You are a complete disgrace.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2013, 04:36:25 AM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Everything would freeze. There is no element with a melting point below absolute zero.

The gasses would not be going directly from room temperature to absolute zero.  They would turn to liquids or solids when the temperature got low enough before reaching absolute zero.

That would cool down our Earth dramatically. All those millions of tons of air being super-cooled to liquid temperatures and being recycled warmed up back towards the centre...

Maybe that is the way the Earth gets rid of its excess heat.

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Rama Set

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2013, 04:57:43 AM »
My theory is, just like the ocean stops at the ice rim, the air stops at the barrier slightly further out, as in, it hits a barrier of absolute zero and ceases to go any further, the same as it does, the higher you go up.

 If air hit absolute zero it would freeze, and eventually all the air would reach this barrier and we would have no breathable air.

Most of the gases in the air would become liquified and flow back to the warmer regions in streams.  Other gases, like carbon dioxide would turn into a solid and fall to the Earth.  Maybe that is why there is so little CO2 in the air?  Just a thought.

Everything would freeze. There is no element with a melting point below absolute zero.

The gasses would not be going directly from room temperature to absolute zero.  They would turn to liquids or solids when the temperature got low enough before reaching absolute zero.

What excess heat?
That would cool down our Earth dramatically. All those millions of tons of air being super-cooled to liquid temperatures and being recycled warmed up back towards the centre...

Maybe that is the way the Earth gets rid of its excess heat.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2013, 07:37:23 PM »
Clearly, the dome of the sky holds in the air. Google even included it in their depiction of the flat earth.


Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2013, 07:53:43 PM »
Clearly, the dome of the sky holds in the air. Google even included it in their depiction of the flat earth.



So you take an image of google as your evidence? I can also show you a cartoon of a talking rabbit, walking on two feet, eating a carrot and being smarter than the hunter. Does that proof anything..? No.

Even with your google image...what is the dome made of, what is the dome?
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Foxy

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Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2013, 07:57:39 PM »
Clearly, the dome of the sky holds in the air. Google even included it in their depiction of the flat earth.



So you take an image of google as your evidence? I can also show you a cartoon of a talking rabbit, walking on two feet, eating a carrot and being smarter than the hunter. Does that proof anything..? No.

Even with your google image...what is the dome made of, what is the dome?

I think he was just showing something he found to be interesting. He didn't necessarily say it was evidence.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2013, 08:11:54 PM »
Clearly, the dome of the sky holds in the air. Google even included it in their depiction of the flat earth.



So you take an image of google as your evidence? I can also show you a cartoon of a talking rabbit, walking on two feet, eating a carrot and being smarter than the hunter. Does that proof anything..? No.

When Google depicts the earth as a flat disc in their Google Doodle for earth day, yes, I take them seriously. I think that's pretty huge... their logo, spread all over the flat earth. Fitting, isn't it? They even have the water dripping off the edge.

Your other question isn't even worth answering.

Re: Ocean on Flat Earth
« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2013, 08:36:11 PM »
the sky is covered by a dome?  ???
what is it made from?