Things not crashing into earth (UA)

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Dog

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Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« on: February 20, 2013, 12:49:41 AM »
Ok sooooooooo there's this 'Universal Accelerator' pushing the earth up. Which is why the earth comes crashing 'up' into us when we jump or leave the ground. So why aren't birds and planes crashing into the ground around us? In reality they are using air foils to lessen the effect of gravity, but in UA-world it shouldn't matter what the plane is doing, the earth is always accelerating and should smash into it anyways. Why doesn't this happen?

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darknavyseal

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2013, 01:10:19 AM »
Dog, the "accelerating Earth" pushes the air too at the same rate, which also pushes whatever has a high enough surface area to mass ratio. It works the same way as gravity, as far as simulating gravity goes.

The same reason when gravity is pulling something down, the air "holds" it up. Now if the air is pushing up according to FE, it would provide the same result.

Keep in mind, I am RE. Just pointing some things out.

Cheers.

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 04:37:25 AM »
The air is filled with magical dust which constantly thrusts flying objects upwards so the Earth doesn't catch up to them

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 04:40:16 AM »
Dog, the "accelerating Earth" pushes the air too at the same rate, which also pushes whatever has a high enough surface area to mass ratio. It works the same way as gravity, as far as simulating gravity goes.

The same reason when gravity is pulling something down, the air "holds" it up. Now if the air is pushing up according to FE, it would provide the same result.

Keep in mind, I am RE. Just pointing some things out.

Cheers.

So why do feathers fall?  >o<

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EnglshGentleman

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2013, 03:54:12 PM »
Dog, the "accelerating Earth" pushes the air too at the same rate, which also pushes whatever has a high enough surface area to mass ratio. It works the same way as gravity, as far as simulating gravity goes.

The same reason when gravity is pulling something down, the air "holds" it up. Now if the air is pushing up according to FE, it would provide the same result.

Keep in mind, I am RE. Just pointing some things out.

Cheers.

So why do feathers fall?  >o<

He told you the principle, it works the same way for feathers. In RE, feathers fall slowly because they have a high surface area and low mass which means the drag force on it is significant enough to counteract some of the force of gravity. In FE it merely works in the opposite direction. The cushion of air interacts with the feather enough to move it in the same direction the Earth is moving, but not so much that the accelerating Earth will not eventually catch up.

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Dog

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 06:15:03 PM »
Hmmmmmmm darn, I guess the earth really is flat then  :-\

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2013, 09:40:42 PM »
Dog, the "accelerating Earth" pushes the air too at the same rate, which also pushes whatever has a high enough surface area to mass ratio. It works the same way as gravity, as far as simulating gravity goes.

The same reason when gravity is pulling something down, the air "holds" it up. Now if the air is pushing up according to FE, it would provide the same result.

Keep in mind, I am RE. Just pointing some things out.

Cheers.

So why do feathers fall?  >o<

He told you the principle, it works the same way for feathers. In RE, feathers fall slowly because they have a high surface area and low mass which means the drag force on it is significant enough to counteract some of the force of gravity. In FE it merely works in the opposite direction. The cushion of air interacts with the feather enough to move it in the same direction the Earth is moving, but not so much that the accelerating Earth will not eventually catch up.

The UA can keep planes in the air, but not a feather  ??? That doesn't make sense  >:(

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darknavyseal

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2013, 12:44:28 AM »
Maptor, I will try to say this one more time. Gravity can be (almost) be perfectly simulated by constant acceleration. That is what gravity is. The mathematical formula for gravity is acceleration. The only difference is that in FE, the earth is coming up to meet us, and in RE, we are going down to meet earth. According to relativity, these are exactly the same. It all depends on your frame of reference.

Regarding UA, it is a mysterious phenomenon that is sort of like a "wind" that pushes the 'flat' earth from the bottom. WE are not directly affected by UA, the Earth is. So UA is not holding the feather up, or trying to, because eventually it will fall. Instead, it is pushing the air on the earth which in turn pushes on the feather. This push by air is not enough to keep the feather floating forever, because eventually it will fall through the air that is less dense than it, and hit the ground.

Good thing to note. Things that are more dense than other things will always try to equalize themselves. More dense things tend to fall towards the ground, which can be seen with oil and water. Feathers are more dense than air. They will always fall towards the ground unless another force is acting on them. This can be a brisk wind or someone picking the feather up.

Anything else, Maptor? I highly suggest you spend your energy on other topics, because hypothetically, if UA existed, it would almost perfectly simulate gravity. Exceptions to this would be experiments proving that gravity is weaker on the equator due to centrifugal forces and gravity being slightly weaker during a solar eclipse.

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2013, 04:51:53 AM »
Quote
Maptor, I will try to say this one more time. Gravity can be (almost) be perfectly simulated by constant acceleration. That is what gravity is. The mathematical formula for gravity is acceleration. The only difference is that in FE, the earth is coming up to meet us, and in RE, we are going down to meet earth. According to relativity, these are exactly the same. It all depends on your frame of reference.

Regarding UA, it is a mysterious phenomenon that is sort of like a "wind" that pushes the 'flat' earth from the bottom. WE are not directly affected by UA, the Earth is. So UA is not holding the feather up, or trying to, because eventually it will fall. Instead, it is pushing the air on the earth which in turn pushes on the feather. This push by air is not enough to keep the feather floating forever, because eventually it will fall through the air that is less dense than it, and hit the ground.

Good thing to note. Things that are more dense than other things will always try to equalize themselves. More dense things tend to fall towards the ground, which can be seen with oil and water. Feathers are more dense than air. They will always fall towards the ground unless another force is acting on them. This can be a brisk wind or someone picking the feather up.

Anything else, Maptor? I highly suggest you spend your energy on other topics, because hypothetically, if UA existed, it would almost perfectly simulate gravity. Exceptions to this would be experiments proving that gravity is weaker on the equator due to centrifugal forces and gravity being slightly weaker during a solar eclipse.
Acceleration and gravity are only indistinguishable for small enough regions and in the absence of any tidal forces. To differentiate gravity and acceleration on larger regions just measure the force at one point and on another further away from the mass. If they are different, pure acceleration is refuted. That's why FE has to rely on something else other than UA to explain small differences on g, like celestial gravitation or the earth tilting.
Also, if the UA affects the air, why doesn't it affect anything else? Or is the air being pushed by earth?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2013, 06:24:26 AM »
Quote
Maptor, I will try to say this one more time. Gravity can be (almost) be perfectly simulated by constant acceleration. That is what gravity is. The mathematical formula for gravity is acceleration. The only difference is that in FE, the earth is coming up to meet us, and in RE, we are going down to meet earth. According to relativity, these are exactly the same. It all depends on your frame of reference.

Regarding UA, it is a mysterious phenomenon that is sort of like a "wind" that pushes the 'flat' earth from the bottom. WE are not directly affected by UA, the Earth is. So UA is not holding the feather up, or trying to, because eventually it will fall. Instead, it is pushing the air on the earth which in turn pushes on the feather. This push by air is not enough to keep the feather floating forever, because eventually it will fall through the air that is less dense than it, and hit the ground.

Good thing to note. Things that are more dense than other things will always try to equalize themselves. More dense things tend to fall towards the ground, which can be seen with oil and water. Feathers are more dense than air. They will always fall towards the ground unless another force is acting on them. This can be a brisk wind or someone picking the feather up.

Anything else, Maptor? I highly suggest you spend your energy on other topics, because hypothetically, if UA existed, it would almost perfectly simulate gravity. Exceptions to this would be experiments proving that gravity is weaker on the equator due to centrifugal forces and gravity being slightly weaker during a solar eclipse.
Acceleration and gravity are only indistinguishable for small enough regions and in the absence of any tidal forces. To differentiate gravity and acceleration on larger regions just measure the force at one point and on another further away from the mass. If they are different, pure acceleration is refuted. That's why FE has to rely on something else other than UA to explain small differences on g, like celestial gravitation or the earth tilting.
Also, if the UA affects the air, why doesn't it affect anything else? Or is the air being pushed by earth?

Something is pushing the Earth from below, and the Earth is pushing us and the air at the same rate of acceleration.

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markjo

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2013, 06:25:37 AM »
The UA can keep planes in the air, but not a feather  ??? That doesn't make sense  >:(
Airplanes generate lift.  Feathers don't. ::)
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2013, 07:32:23 AM »
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Something is pushing the Earth from below, and the Earth is pushing us and the air at the same rate of acceleration.
A question about this, assuming a finite earth:
since earth is denser than the air (a safe assumption I think), earth would sink, dislodging the air and making it "leak" through the boundaries. So unless there's a continual source of air above or a mechanism to get the "leaked" air back, we would run out of atmosphere at some point.

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EnglshGentleman

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2013, 07:36:50 AM »
Quote
Something is pushing the Earth from below, and the Earth is pushing us and the air at the same rate of acceleration.
A question about this, assuming a finite earth:
since earth is denser than the air (a safe assumption I think), earth would sink, dislodging the air and making it "leak" through the boundaries. So unless there's a continual source of air above or a mechanism to get the "leaked" air back, we would run out of atmosphere at some point.

Umm... could you reiterate this? What exactly is the Earth sinking into, and how is the air being dislodged?

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2013, 08:03:08 AM »
The UA can keep planes in the air, but not a feather  ??? That doesn't make sense  >:(
Airplanes generate lift.  Feathers don't. ::)

So the feather is falling through the UA?

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2013, 08:10:11 AM »
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Umm... could you reiterate this? What exactly is the Earth sinking into, and how is the air being dislodged?
Since air is not being accelerated by the UA and earth is, earth will sink (upwards) and dislodge the air above, much like a piece of metal sinking in water dislodges the water below it to make place for itself.  And then we would run out of air eventually, unless there's an infinite column of air above, or a source that is continually producing air and pumping it to earth.

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Ski

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2013, 12:59:28 PM »
I believe I see what you are saying, and the answer lies within the Katabatic winds found in the rim country. As the air cools far beyond the reach of the sun, the wind accelerates down the ice pack and the large mountain range encircling the known earth.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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Dog

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2013, 02:31:30 PM »
I see my simple observation has brought up many questions lol. Anyways, in FET how does the air stay above earth? If I hold a frisbee in a waterfall the water cascades over the sides. So do you now have to come up with FET made-up magical force #233 to account for this?

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Ski

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2013, 03:13:08 PM »
 ???  The atmosphere isn't the result of a waterfall. Space isn't filled with atmosphere causing drag and then continuously spilling over the edge. 
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2013, 03:52:46 PM »
Quote
I believe I see what you are saying, and the answer lies within the Katabatic winds found in the rim country. As the air cools far beyond the reach of the sun, the wind accelerates down the ice pack and the large mountain range encircling the known earth.
So when the earth pushes through the atmosphere and the air moves to the edge, it cools down and these Katabatic winds push it back?
Do you know of an explanation for a flat earth with antarctica as a separate ladmass, not as a rim country?

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Ski

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2013, 04:27:48 PM »
It might be much the same as the southern reaches of the earth proceed into what Rowbotham calls "the outer gloom and darkness, in which the material world is lost to human perception."
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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markjo

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2013, 06:15:33 PM »
The UA can keep planes in the air, but not a feather  ??? That doesn't make sense  >:(
Airplanes generate lift.  Feathers don't. ::)

So the feather is falling through the UA?

It's generally (but not necessarily universally) accepted among UA proponents that the earth itself shields a region from the surface of the earth to a yet undetermined altitude (probably 100 km or higher) from the direct effects of the UA.  So, no, the feather is not falling through the UA.  Likewise, the airplane is not flying through the UA either.
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Dog

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2013, 02:19:32 AM »
???  The atmosphere isn't the result of a waterfall. Space isn't filled with atmosphere causing drag and then continuously spilling over the edge.

Well you know what I mean:



You believe in the atmosphere bubble in A correct?

What keeps the atmosphere above earth? If the earth is accelerating upwards then it would just plow through the atmosphere as seen in B. Much like the water being pulled over the frisbee but in reverse, since you say UA and gravity supposedly have the same effect.

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2013, 04:55:56 AM »
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Well you know what I mean:


You believe in the atmosphere bubble in A correct?

What keeps the atmosphere above earth? If the earth is accelerating upwards then it would just plow through the atmosphere as seen in B. Much like the water being pulled over the frisbee but in reverse, since you say UA and gravity supposedly have the same effect.
That was my question exactly. There are apparently katabatic winds on the rim that prevents the air from leaving earth's boundaries by carrying it down the ice wall...

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Pongo

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2013, 07:28:25 AM »
The ice wall holds in the air. Or possibly the firmament.

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2013, 07:36:33 AM »
So is the top of the atmosphere lower at the ice wall?
I'd like to agree with you but then we'd both be wrong!

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Pongo

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2013, 07:56:52 AM »
Or, more likely, the ice wall is much taller than you realize.

Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2013, 07:58:47 AM »
Or, more likely, the ice wall is much taller than you realize.
A more accurate statement would be "seeing as no one has seen the ice wall it is probably much higher than we have imagined up to this point".
I'd like to agree with you but then we'd both be wrong!

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Sytruan

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2013, 09:10:42 AM »
Or, more likely, the ice wall is much taller than you realize.
Hold on. If the ice wall is tall enough to keep the atmosphere in, are you claiming that the ice wall is about 800 miles high? (because the top layer of the atmosphere goes up to about 800 miles above the earth)

...okay, that claim is clearly false - anyone who has been to Antarctica or anywhere near would have seen a giant 800-mile-high wall.

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darknavyseal

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Re: Things not crashing into earth (UA)
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2013, 10:19:35 AM »
unless.....God painted it to be the exact color of the sky, thereby camouflaging it....perfectly.  :o

A wall that high would be visible from everywhere. Felix, that skyjumper guy, would have seen it, airplanes would see it, everyone would see it. Because there is not enough air to block the view. Pongo made this up guys. It doesn't mean FErs believe this rubbish.