Ask a Physicist anything.

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John Davis

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #60 on: March 06, 2013, 02:59:18 PM »
Name one scientific principle, theory, or ideal that has not an expert opposing it.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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Homesick Martian

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #61 on: March 06, 2013, 10:29:29 PM »
Hmmm....earth is round?

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #62 on: May 11, 2013, 07:44:36 AM »
So I'm a physicist. I am finishing off a Masters in general physics and am currently applying to PHDs. Hence I know lots of science. If any of you have questions (which is why most people come to this forum) I will try to answer them and explain them. I should clarify, I am a round earth believer so I believe main stream physics. If any parts of main stream science confuse you / to you there seem to be holes in theory I will try to explain the confusing jargon / explain what modern science's answer to that hole in theory is.

When I look in the mirror, I am back to front but not upside down.  Why? 

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Tausami

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #63 on: May 11, 2013, 09:21:46 AM »
So I'm a physicist. I am finishing off a Masters in general physics and am currently applying to PHDs. Hence I know lots of science. If any of you have questions (which is why most people come to this forum) I will try to answer them and explain them. I should clarify, I am a round earth believer so I believe main stream physics. If any parts of main stream science confuse you / to you there seem to be holes in theory I will try to explain the confusing jargon / explain what modern science's answer to that hole in theory is.

When I look in the mirror, I am back to front but not upside down.  Why?

It's actually not very complicated, if you think about it.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #64 on: May 11, 2013, 10:00:50 AM »
So I'm a physicist. I am finishing off a Masters in general physics and am currently applying to PHDs. Hence I know lots of science. If any of you have questions (which is why most people come to this forum) I will try to answer them and explain them. I should clarify, I am a round earth believer so I believe main stream physics. If any parts of main stream science confuse you / to you there seem to be holes in theory I will try to explain the confusing jargon / explain what modern science's answer to that hole in theory is.

When I look in the mirror, I am back to front but not upside down.  Why?

It's actually not very complicated, if you think about it.
Please explain it.

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EnglshGentleman

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #65 on: May 11, 2013, 10:50:11 AM »
Why is ice slippery?
A combination of factors, applied pressure to melt the surface layer/ frictional heating to melt the surface layer. At lower temperatures however the phase properties of ice become quite complicated. In essence the bonds at the surface of the water are weaker, as you would imagine, and the structure of ice has a high free energy facilitating a "semi-liquid" state for these surface molecules. Basically the surface of ice is a very thin liquid and we all know liquids are slippery.

Molasses is a liquid, and it is not slippery. Tar is not slippery either.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #66 on: May 11, 2013, 12:27:58 PM »
Why is ice slippery?
A combination of factors, applied pressure to melt the surface layer/ frictional heating to melt the surface layer. At lower temperatures however the phase properties of ice become quite complicated. In essence the bonds at the surface of the water are weaker, as you would imagine, and the structure of ice has a high free energy facilitating a "semi-liquid" state for these surface molecules. Basically the surface of ice is a very thin liquid and we all know liquids are slippery.

Molasses is a liquid, and it is not slippery. Tar is not slippery either.
And Teflon is a solid and that's really slippery.

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #67 on: May 11, 2013, 12:55:02 PM »
So I'm a physicist. I am finishing off a Masters in general physics and am currently applying to PHDs. Hence I know lots of science. If any of you have questions (which is why most people come to this forum) I will try to answer them and explain them. I should clarify, I am a round earth believer so I believe main stream physics. If any parts of main stream science confuse you / to you there seem to be holes in theory I will try to explain the confusing jargon / explain what modern science's answer to that hole in theory is.

When I look in the mirror, I am back to front but not upside down.  Why?

Back to front?

If you stand looking at the mirror.

Your left arm is on the left side of the mirror, your right arm is on the right side of the mirror. Likewise your top half is nearer the top of the mirror, your bottom half is nearer the bottom of the mirror.

Why would you be upside down?

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EnglshGentleman

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #68 on: May 13, 2013, 08:21:11 PM »
Why is ice slippery?
A combination of factors, applied pressure to melt the surface layer/ frictional heating to melt the surface layer. At lower temperatures however the phase properties of ice become quite complicated. In essence the bonds at the surface of the water are weaker, as you would imagine, and the structure of ice has a high free energy facilitating a "semi-liquid" state for these surface molecules. Basically the surface of ice is a very thin liquid and we all know liquids are slippery.

Molasses is a liquid, and it is not slippery. Tar is not slippery either.
And Teflon is a solid and that's really slippery.

Not it isn't. You wouldn't lubricate something with Teflon, would you?

Graphite is slippery.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #69 on: May 14, 2013, 03:54:49 AM »
And Teflon is a solid and that's really slippery.

Not it isn't. You wouldn't lubricate something with Teflon, would you?

Is your google broken?


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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #70 on: May 14, 2013, 04:10:51 AM »
Graphite is more slippery than Teflon. 

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Thork

« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 04:14:40 AM by Thork »

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #72 on: May 14, 2013, 04:16:59 AM »
You don't have to make stuff up, Thork.  Graphite is the most slipperiest substance known to man.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #73 on: May 14, 2013, 04:19:50 AM »
Unlike you I provided two citations to show you that graphite is not the slipperiest substance known to man. It has a coefficient of friction of 0.1. My example Teflon was way better with a coefficient of just 0.04. Why people keep making that inferior suggestion, I don't know?

I don't want to hear another peep out of you unless you have a source to back up your lies.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #74 on: May 14, 2013, 04:22:49 AM »
It is common knowledge that graphite is the most slippery substance on Earth.  You not accepting this fact does not change it.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #75 on: May 14, 2013, 04:24:25 AM »
It is common knowledge that graphite is the most slippery substance on Earth.  You not accepting this fact does not change it.

It is not! >o<

Quote from: http://www.theecologist.org/green_green_living/behind_the_label/269783/behind_the_label_chain_lube.html
According to the Guinness Book of Records, Teflon is the world’s most slippery substance.

Stop making up lies! >o<

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #76 on: May 14, 2013, 04:26:12 AM »
You can post NASA "fact" all you want.  It doesn't change anything.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #77 on: May 14, 2013, 04:28:48 AM »
http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Question80836.html

^ Its everywhere. You've posted nothing. You may as well have said "vaginal discharge is the slipperiest substance on earth, its common knowledge", for all the evidence you have provided.

You are a know-nothing hill-billy who shoots his mouth off without a clue about anything. You should not argue with me. I'm very clever and know lots. You don't have that pedigree.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #78 on: May 14, 2013, 04:32:01 AM »
I will not fall for  your word play games, Thork.  You can not deny the slipperiness of graphite.

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #79 on: May 14, 2013, 10:27:49 AM »
There are different types of friction.

I think you maybe confusing the difference between lubricated friction and dry friction.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #80 on: May 14, 2013, 10:38:12 AM »
There are different types of friction.

I think you maybe confusing the difference between lubricated friction and dry friction.

The last time I did that, I got a slap.

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #81 on: May 17, 2013, 12:13:40 PM »
Uncertainty Principle, you can't see how fast something is and where it is at the same time with the same level of accuracy. What do you not understand about that?

I didn't ask what it was, I asked why physicists are so bad at explaining it to laymen. You're not even a physicist. I know perfectly well what it is. You think you're so smart, Rushy, let's see you explain it rather than just state it, shall we?
The reason you cannot measure both the position and speed is beacuse to measure something you have to interact with it. there are two ways to do this, to get the speed you use the wave function, and to get the position you use the partile function; when a particle hits another particle it interrupts its speed, and when you use a wave it is spread out so the position is only probable.

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Tausami

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #82 on: May 17, 2013, 12:21:38 PM »
So I'm a physicist. I am finishing off a Masters in general physics and am currently applying to PHDs. Hence I know lots of science. If any of you have questions (which is why most people come to this forum) I will try to answer them and explain them. I should clarify, I am a round earth believer so I believe main stream physics. If any parts of main stream science confuse you / to you there seem to be holes in theory I will try to explain the confusing jargon / explain what modern science's answer to that hole in theory is.

When I look in the mirror, I am back to front but not upside down.  Why?

It's actually not very complicated, if you think about it.
Please explain it.

Certainly. Imagine a single photon of light. It bounces off of your shirt, then off of the mirror, then into your eye. Now let's imagine a line of atoms. Let's say there's three. When they start moving off of your shirt, they're in a line so that photon 1 is on the left, photon 2 is in the middle, and photon 3 is on the right. Now they hit the mirror and reverse direction. However, they do not change their positions relative to each other. Therefore, looking at yourself in the mirror is equivalent to standing in front of yourself and looking at your body. When you look in a mirror, you see what you would see if you were looking out from it.

Does that make sense? It's kind of difficult to explain.

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Tausami

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #83 on: May 17, 2013, 12:31:07 PM »
Uncertainty Principle, you can't see how fast something is and where it is at the same time with the same level of accuracy. What do you not understand about that?

I didn't ask what it was, I asked why physicists are so bad at explaining it to laymen. You're not even a physicist. I know perfectly well what it is. You think you're so smart, Rushy, let's see you explain it rather than just state it, shall we?
The reason you cannot measure both the position and speed is beacuse to measure something you have to interact with it. there are two ways to do this, to get the speed you use the wave function, and to get the position you use the partile function; when a particle hits another particle it interrupts its speed, and when you use a wave it is spread out so the position is only probable.

That's actually not true. It has nothing to do with the way we interact with particles, the Uncertainty Principle is a fundamental law of nature.
#ws" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">What is the Uncertainty Principle?
« Last Edit: May 17, 2013, 12:35:15 PM by Tausami »

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #84 on: May 17, 2013, 12:34:49 PM »
Uncertainty Principle, you can't see how fast something is and where it is at the same time with the same level of accuracy. What do you not understand about that?

I didn't ask what it was, I asked why physicists are so bad at explaining it to laymen. You're not even a physicist. I know perfectly well what it is. You think you're so smart, Rushy, let's see you explain it rather than just state it, shall we?
The reason you cannot measure both the position and speed is beacuse to measure something you have to interact with it. there are two ways to do this, to get the speed you use the wave function, and to get the position you use the partile function; when a particle hits another particle it interrupts its speed, and when you use a wave it is spread out so the position is only probable.

That's actually not true. It has nothing to do with the way we interact with particles, the Uncertainty Principle is a fundamental law of nature.

#ws" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle Explained

Veritasium explains it better than I ever could, and I recommend you watch the video linked at the end as well.
Maybe I misunderstood the question, but I was not explaining the uncertainty principle, just one manfiestation of it. and furthermore, because it is a fundemental law does not mean you cannot explain emergent phenomena in an emergent way (which is actually more understandable to the layman).

P.S next time you diagree with something I say, please make it explicit what you actually disagree with instead of going "meta", it makes discussion a lot less like quibbling.

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Rama Set

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #85 on: May 18, 2013, 07:21:39 AM »
Uncertainty Principle, you can't see how fast something is and where it is at the same time with the same level of accuracy. What do you not understand about that?

I didn't ask what it was, I asked why physicists are so bad at explaining it to laymen. You're not even a physicist. I know perfectly well what it is. You think you're so smart, Rushy, let's see you explain it rather than just state it, shall we?
The reason you cannot measure both the position and speed is beacuse to measure something you have to interact with it. there are two ways to do this, to get the speed you use the wave function, and to get the position you use the partile function; when a particle hits another particle it interrupts its speed, and when you use a wave it is spread out so the position is only probable.

This is exactly how Leonard Susskind explained in his intro to QM at Stanford, available on Youtube. If its good enough for Leonard, its good enough for me.
Aether is the  characteristic of action or inaction of charged  & noncharged particals.

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #86 on: May 25, 2013, 01:04:51 PM »
Graphite is the most slippery substance on Earth.

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Thork

Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #87 on: May 25, 2013, 02:22:06 PM »
Graphite is the most slippery substance on Earth.
Except it isn't. That auspicious title belongs to Teflon. This is why we have Teflon coated frying pans and not graphite coated frying pans.

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RyanTG

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #88 on: May 26, 2013, 02:18:51 AM »
Except it isn't. That auspicious title belongs to Teflon. This is why we have Teflon coated frying pans and not graphite coated frying pans.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 02:21:13 AM by RyanTG »

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Sean

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Re: Ask a Physicist anything.
« Reply #89 on: May 26, 2013, 03:33:54 AM »
Is Schrodinger's Cat still relevant?
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Better bring a better augment, something not so stupid.