Poll

Do you think the Coriolis Effect is actually real?

Yes
6 (75%)
No
2 (25%)

Total Members Voted: 7

Voting closed: January 19, 2013, 07:31:07 PM

Explain The Coriolis Effect

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Explain The Coriolis Effect
« on: January 09, 2013, 01:52:45 PM »
How does the Flat Earth Society explain the Corolis Effect? The Coriolis Effect is the deflection of moving objects when they are viewed in a rotating uniform reference frame. When you are north of the equator, cyclones, hurricanes, and tornadoes blow clockwise. When you are in the southern hemisphere, the winds blow counter-clockwise.

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squevil

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2013, 03:01:35 PM »
So explain why they sometimes spin the other way too. Because your bold statement is not 100% accurate.

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2013, 06:43:21 PM »
Do an experiment.

1. Fill a water holder, or a sink, with water.
2. Make a hole in the bottom.
3. If not altered by another force, the Whirlpool will spin counter-clockwise in the southern hemisphere (on the real, non-flat globe), and clockwise in the northern hemisphere.

And by the way, I do not have to be 100% accurate (though I am 100% accurate, excepting spins altered by another force). I just have to be correct a majority of the time, which suggests that the phenomenon is really taking place.



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markjo

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2013, 07:35:30 PM »
That's because the Coriolis force is far too weak to affect water draining from a small container.
http://www.snopes.com/science/coriolis.asp
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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2013, 07:45:00 PM »
3. If not altered by another force

Yeah, good luck with that.
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2013, 08:37:45 PM »
i've done the water experiment over and over, in my kitchen sink. i've varied the depth, the temperature, and i've sacrificed bottle after bottle of liquid soap changing the viscosity.

the water spins down randomly, or it goes down whichever way you started it down.

besides, the coriolis effect is capable of inducing a single 360-degree rotation in a moving fluid over 24 hours. my sink drains in lots less time than that.
true wisdom is always concise

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 02:01:27 AM »
So explain why they sometimes spin the other way too. Because your bold statement is not 100% accurate.

This is incorrect. Hurricanes always spin counter clockwise in the northern hemisphere, and cyclones always clockwise in the southern. The further a storm from the equator, generally the more powerful the storm.

Unfortunately you cannot demonstrate this by draining water down the sink.

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squevil

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2013, 09:23:07 AM »
im pretty sure there have been accounts where they spin the other way. tornados do at least.

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2013, 09:37:28 AM »
im pretty sure there have been accounts where they spin the other way. tornados do at least.

Small tornadoes can due to eddy effects from a larger storm. The Rossby *number can be used to accurately gauge the influence of a natural Coriolis effect- it's use, however, requires that the earth is a rotating sphere.

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2013, 01:45:04 PM »
"This force causes moving objects on the surface of the Earth to be deflected in a clockwise sense (with respect to the direction of travel) in the northern hemisphere, and in a counter-clockwise sense in the southern hemisphere." [Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect]

My assumption with the sink was incorrect, but nevertheless, it doesn't change the argument. If there is the Coriolis Effect, then it suggests a moving reference frame. If there is a moving reference frame, it suggests that the earth is rotating.

My Reasoning

Coriolis Effect --->
Moving Reference Frame --->
Earth Rotating --->
Flat Earth Theory Incorrect --->
No Flat Earth --->
Spherical Earth


« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 04:28:27 PM by BobTheGreat »

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squevil

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2013, 02:26:07 PM »
from a quick glance it appears 1-1000 tornados spin the other way. hurricanes never do. absolute proof of a round earth? no not really as there is an ather wind theory floating about that can account for that. whats interesting though is that hurricanes never cross the equator and winds rarely even cross the equator. what i would deduct from that is that infinite earth theory would be false at least.

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2013, 04:05:16 PM »
from a quick glance it appears 1-1000 tornados spin the other way. hurricanes never do. absolute proof of a round earth? no not really as there is an ather wind theory floating about that can account for that. whats interesting though is that hurricanes never cross the equator and winds rarely even cross the equator. what i would deduct from that is that infinite earth theory would be false at least.

Aether wind as I understand it is a near 150-year old theory of the nature of light? I know little about it but I don't think it has much to do with the weather.

Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2013, 04:18:52 PM »
The Ether theory is over 150 years old.  It was used to try to prove Einstein wrong (on relativity). And if I'm correct, The Flat Earth does back Einstein in his claims. Therefore, the Flat Earth Society does not believe in the Ether.  And because of that, it can't be used to prove me wrong. Also, ether has been disproved by the Michelson-Morley experiment. See "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelson%E2%80%93Morley_experiment". Even if ether theory was correct, then it would shift the hurricane's movement, not change the direction it spins.

By the way, ether affects light, not wind.

The reason tornadoes spin the other way is because storm conditions alter the course.

You can look to whirlpools for even stronger evidence. The whirlpools, though, must not be changed by any other force. Also, it must be big enough to "catch" the earth's rotation.
For Those of You Who Want More Proof:
« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 04:44:43 PM by BobTheGreat »

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markjo

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2013, 07:47:44 PM »
Actually, aether dates back to the Ancient Greeks who considered it to be one of the classical elements, along with air, earth, fire and water.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aether_%28classical_element%29
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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2013, 02:33:59 PM »
It wasn't really used to prove Einstein wrong, rather it was just the "best guess", used by scientists at the time to explain certain phenomena before the time of Special Relativity- a little like dark energy being used these days in explaining universe expansion- it's an unknown.

But, yes, people here get a little confused. They also do seem to think it involves actual wind.

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Tausami

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Re: Explain The Coriolis Effect
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2013, 02:56:02 PM »
The Aetheric Wind is not the same as luminiferous aether. It's called aether simply because it's a substance which exists in outer space and is not completely understood, much like the various aethers of old. Besides, one of Einstein's more controversial theories calls the vector field of gravity which bends space-time 'aether'. It's not like this is only time the word has been used to describe something different. Also, I'm not good at naming things.

Aetheric Wind has nothing to do with Luminiferous Aether. Absolutely nothing. They share the same name. That's it.

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More on topic, according to AWT some aether permeates the atmosphere before out-accelerating the Earth. Since it's still moving in the circular formation of the whirlwind to some degree, this causes Coriolis.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 02:59:57 PM by Tausami »