Sunlight

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Zurian

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Sunlight
« on: November 30, 2012, 02:18:55 PM »
I'm positive people will start accusing me of not reading the FAQ, or the other posts that regard my question, but I have yet to see a clear answer, so I shall ask anyway.

The explanation describing the sun as a spotlight states that the sun and moon rotate at 3,000 miles above the ocean, illuminating only certain parts of the earth, thus night and day. It is a confirmed measurement among both flat-earthers and round-earthers that 50% of the earth (aside from the infinite ice walls in FET) is illuminated by the sun at all times. If the spotlight theory was correct, only around 1/5 of earth's surface would be visibly lit. If the spotlight were bigger, so that half of earth IS illuminated, then a sizable amount of the earth would be lit at all times. This disproves the spotlight theory.

As for the floodlight theory, believed by some on this forum, the light would scatter to cover more than 50% of the earth at a given time (according to the hypothesis that the sun is 32 mi in diameter, as stated in the FAQ).

So either way, the FAQ is incorrect.

What is the real reason according to FET that exactly 50% of the earth is illuminated at all times? and What is the explanation for night and day? Clearly your prior explanations have holes.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 02:44:38 PM by Zurian »
Please take some Troll classes from Rushy, he at least tries.

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 03:20:38 PM »
you are correct but remember FE believers like to create random phenomena to explain these types of scenarios, yet they call themselves zetetics.

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Lorddave

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2012, 04:54:49 PM »
50% of the Earth is not always lit at any given time.  In the far north or far south, some areas are lit for months at a time.  This means that more than 50% is lit or dark at any given time.
You have been ignored for common interest of mankind.

I am a terrible person and I am a typical Blowhard Liberal for being wrong about Bom.

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2012, 06:26:24 AM »
 
As for the floodlight theory, believed by some on this forum, the light would scatter to cover more than 50% of the earth at a given time (according to the hypothesis that the sun is 32 mi in diameter, as stated in the FAQ).

The sun is a sphere, so it does act more like a floodlight.
You can re-create this in your own house. Take a spherical light bulb and shine place it 4 ft above a darkened empty room. Look at the floor, see that it creates  a wide circle of light? Try the same with a pen light, see how it only shines maybe 1/10 of the light on the floor.  This proves that the sun acts like a floodlight, and definitely  not a "spotlight"



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Zurian

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2012, 07:37:37 AM »

As for the floodlight theory, believed by some on this forum, the light would scatter to cover more than 50% of the earth at a given time (according to the hypothesis that the sun is 32 mi in diameter, as stated in the FAQ).

The sun is a sphere, so it does act more like a floodlight.
You can re-create this in your own house. Take a spherical light bulb and shine place it 4 ft above a darkened empty room. Look at the floor, see that it creates  a wide circle of light? Try the same with a pen light, see how it only shines maybe 1/10 of the light on the floor.  This proves that the sun acts like a floodlight, and definitely  not a "spotlight"

You are correct in saying the sun acts as a floodlight if you agree that the earth is round. With a flat earth, however, with the proportions given in the FAQ, the light would illuminate over half of the earth.
Please take some Troll classes from Rushy, he at least tries.

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markjo

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2012, 09:10:29 AM »
The sun is a sphere, so it does act more like a floodlight.
You can re-create this in your own house. Take a spherical light bulb and shine place it 4 ft above a darkened empty room. Look at the floor, see that it creates  a wide circle of light?

I don't know what kind of light bulbs you have in your house, but I have a CFL bulb about 4 inches from the ceiling and it illuminates the entire ceiling.  Granted, there is a "hot spot" near the bulb, but I assure you that the entire ceiling, from wall to wall, is illuminated by the bulb.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2012, 10:14:23 AM »
The sun is a sphere, so it does act more like a floodlight.
You can re-create this in your own house. Take a spherical light bulb and shine place it 4 ft above a darkened empty room. Look at the floor, see that it creates  a wide circle of light?

I don't know what kind of light bulbs you have in your house, but I have a CFL bulb about 4 inches from the ceiling and it illuminates the entire ceiling.  Granted, there is a "hot spot" near the bulb, but I assure you that the entire ceiling, from wall to wall, is illuminated by the bulb.


Lower you bare bulb to 1/2 height and repeat in an empty darkened room.
Yes, the walls will be illuminated, as they should be.
But the floor will show a wide circle of light.

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markjo

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2012, 11:56:25 AM »
The sun is a sphere, so it does act more like a floodlight.
You can re-create this in your own house. Take a spherical light bulb and shine place it 4 ft above a darkened empty room. Look at the floor, see that it creates  a wide circle of light?

I don't know what kind of light bulbs you have in your house, but I have a CFL bulb about 4 inches from the ceiling and it illuminates the entire ceiling.  Granted, there is a "hot spot" near the bulb, but I assure you that the entire ceiling, from wall to wall, is illuminated by the bulb.


Lower you bare bulb to 1/2 height and repeat in an empty darkened room.
Yes, the walls will be illuminated, as they should be.
But the floor will show a wide circle of light.

I think that you missed my point.  I'm talking about illuminating the ceiling, not the floor.  The light is very close to the ceiling and is able to illuminate the entire ceiling.  Just because there is a hot spot around the fixture does not take away from the fact that the light did not magically stop at the edge of that hot spot fail to illuminate the rest of the ceiling.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2012, 12:24:31 PM »
50% of the Earth is not always lit at any given time.  In the far north or far south, some areas are lit for months at a time.  This means that more than 50% is lit or dark at any given time.

If the Earth is a sphere and the North Pole is lit then that means the South Pole is not, therefore it's still 50% lit.

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spoon

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2012, 12:46:13 PM »
In the spotlight theory, the spotlight doesn't necessarily shine a circle on earth. FEers use aether to explain strange light behavior, so they could just as easily explain an oval shaped "spotlight" on the earth that lights 50% of earth and follows known daylight patterns.
I work nights are get the feeling of impennding doom for things most people take for granted.

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2012, 06:22:13 PM »
LOL, yeah.

Actually I am curious, according to the FE theory, if the moon is a spot light, does that mean it rotates to angle its light?

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2012, 08:51:19 AM »
The moon is a sphere, not a spotlight.
Its light that is reflected from the sun may in a sense act like a large spot of light, the the moon is not itself a spot light.

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2012, 10:45:26 AM »
i was told that the moon does not reflect light from the sun.  why can't any of you say the same thing

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2012, 04:27:47 PM »
why wouldnt the moon reflect sunlight?
while it may be possible the moon possibly emits ts own light, why wouldnt it reflect light?

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2012, 05:09:08 PM »
i don't see how it couldn't but some on this site were saying some bullshit about bio luminescent organisms on the moon

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2012, 05:12:19 PM »
that makes absolutely no sense, theres no way there'd be that many bio luminescent organisms on the moon, every millimeter of the moon would have to be covered by organisms and it still probably wouldn't be bright enough to be visible from the earth

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2012, 05:13:18 PM »
i said the same thing but apparently it's possible

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2012, 05:53:53 PM »
i can see it being possible, i mean, if there were bioluminescent organisms on the moon, we may not know the strength of the chemical in them if we have never studied them

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2012, 05:55:56 PM »
no, there is no way that the moon could be lit up by bioluminescent organisms, we wouldn't be able to see the contour of the moon if there were, and there is not enough atmosphere on the moon for an organism to survive on it

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2012, 05:59:15 PM »
no, there is no way that the moon could be lit up by bioluminescent organisms, we wouldn't be able to see the contour of the moon if there were, and there is not enough atmosphere on the moon for an organism to survive on it

you don't know that, these organisms ( if they exist) may not need a large amount of oxygen to survive.  and you would be able to see the contour because of the different heights of the organisms on the moon if they are there

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2012, 06:00:47 PM »
true, they may not need much oxygen but there wouldn't be enough oxygen on the moon to sustain the trillions of organisms that would cover every millimeter of the moon's surface

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2012, 06:36:02 PM »
you would still be able to see the contour of the moon though

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burt

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2012, 06:48:40 PM »
I had a similar debate with Rushy not long ago. He basically made some odd claim and tried to prove it with a picture of a triangle. I am sure he still thinks it makes sense.

The Biolumiescent Life-forms are satirically (I think) called Moonshramp. If you look it up in the search bar you might be able to get some detailed explanations of it.

Furthermore there seems to be a wobbling in FE's from whether they believe in theory or believe in only what they can see.

If they only believe in what they can see then they can only say (about the moon) that there is a light that changes shape.

Anything else breaks their code of "no theory".

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2012, 07:22:44 PM »
ive heard of these moonshramp, so if they exist, then there must be water on the moon

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2012, 07:47:59 AM »
there have been traces of water detected on the moon.  remember when we flew that rocket into the moon

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2012, 07:50:26 AM »
who doesn't remember that waste of money to find a couple molecules of water.  but how would that sustain trillions of organisms

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2012, 09:11:21 AM »
maybe they don't need water to survive.  maybe they rely on some other gas

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illmunati

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2012, 09:16:41 AM »
you can't survive without oxygen, no other gas can do waht oxygen does

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burt

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Re: Sunlight
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2012, 12:46:22 PM »
maybe they don't need water to survive.  maybe they rely on some other gas

Water? gas?

Re: Sunlight
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2012, 06:44:57 PM »
traces of water have been detected on the moon.  and there may be some other gas that can sustain life on the moon