My Problems With FE.

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My Problems With FE.
« Reply #60 on: November 27, 2006, 06:43:46 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
Just to clarify, is it safe to assume at this point that FE is asinine and believing in it is more a matter of stubbornness than of true, rational thought?
Very safe.

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TheEngineer

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Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #61 on: November 27, 2006, 08:51:17 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"

No. I'm saying that it could be a larger curvature than he measured.

Exactly.  If the earth has the radius is is supposed to have, he would have measured a larger curvature.


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So, RE does explain the phenomenon of gravity

No, it explains the effects of the phenomenon.
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How does the ice wall withstand this pressure?

By virture of its shape.


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #62 on: November 28, 2006, 12:58:01 PM »
Quote
Quote
How does the ice wall withstand this pressure?

By virture of its shape.


Explain further, please.

My Problems With FE.
« Reply #63 on: November 28, 2006, 02:12:16 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
Just to clarify, is it safe to assume at this point that FE is asinine and believing in it is more a matter of stubbornness than of true, rational thought?


At this point?!
FE Pwnage Archive

http://theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=8101.0


The Engineer is still a douchebag







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TheEngineer

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Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #64 on: November 28, 2006, 02:48:49 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
Quote
Quote
How does the ice wall withstand this pressure?

By virture of its shape.


Explain further, please.

Imagine filling a bucket with water.  How do the sides withstand this pressure?


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

My Problems With FE.
« Reply #65 on: November 28, 2006, 02:50:05 PM »
magic
an vir

Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #66 on: November 28, 2006, 04:36:49 PM »
Quote from: "TheEngineer"
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
Quote
Quote
How does the ice wall withstand this pressure?

By virture of its shape.


Explain further, please.

Imagine filling a bucket with water.  How do the sides withstand this pressure?


Yes but for this ice wall to with stand such a pressure (since the earth is approx 80% water) the ice wall would have to be rediculously thick and high.
eh, I am over it, believe in what you want.

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TheEngineer

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My Problems With FE.
« Reply #67 on: November 28, 2006, 05:27:40 PM »
Perhaps you should familiarize yourself with hydrostatics.


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #68 on: November 28, 2006, 08:49:26 PM »
Quote from: "TheEngineer"
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
Quote
Quote
How does the ice wall withstand this pressure?

By virture of its shape.


Explain further, please.

Imagine filling a bucket with water.  How do the sides withstand this pressure?


The problem is that the bucket and the water must establish thermal equilibrium, which in the case of ice and magma, would melt the magma. Furthermore, magma is applying an increasing force to the wall, whereas the water in the bucket is constant. Thus, your analogy isn't applicable.

Try again.

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TheEngineer

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Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #69 on: November 28, 2006, 09:13:48 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"

The problem is that the bucket and the water must establish thermal equilibrium, which in the case of ice and magma, would melt the magma. Furthermore, magma is applying an increasing force to the wall, whereas the water in the bucket is constant. Thus, your analogy isn't applicable.

What are you talking about?  Where is there ice and magma mixing?

While I am filling the bucket, the force is not constant.  Not to mention that the pressure varies with depth, so I really don't know what you are trying to say...


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #70 on: November 28, 2006, 09:46:22 PM »
Quote from: "TheEngineer"
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"

The problem is that the bucket and the water must establish thermal equilibrium, which in the case of ice and magma, would melt the magma. Furthermore, magma is applying an increasing force to the wall, whereas the water in the bucket is constant. Thus, your analogy isn't applicable.

What are you talking about?  Where is there ice and magma mixing?

While I am filling the bucket, the force is not constant.  Not to mention that the pressure varies with depth, so I really don't know what you are trying to say...


They don't need to mix to reach thermal equilibrium. They just need to be in proximity of each other.

And yes, that's true while filling a bucket the force isn't constant, when it is stationary, the force against the side of the bucket is. Whereas, with the tectonic plates, there is an increasing force against the wall as time goes on.

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TheEngineer

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Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #71 on: November 28, 2006, 09:55:29 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"

They don't need to mix to reach thermal equilibrium. They just need to be in proximity of each other.

And yes, that's true while filling a bucket the force isn't constant, when it is stationary, the force against the side of the bucket is. Whereas, with the tectonic plates, there is an increasing force against the wall as time goes on.

Ok, where are ice and magma in close proximity?

Why would the force increase over time?


"I haven't been wrong since 1961, when I thought I made a mistake."
        -- Bob Hudson

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skeptical scientist

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Re: My Problems With FE.
« Reply #72 on: November 28, 2006, 10:15:56 PM »
Quote from: "Infest in Orion"
They don't need to mix to reach thermal equilibrium. They just need to be in proximity of each other.

And yes, that's true while filling a bucket the force isn't constant, when it is stationary, the force against the side of the bucket is. Whereas, with the tectonic plates, there is an increasing force against the wall as time goes on.

Ok, where are they in proximity with each other?

Also, note that the ice wall is radiating heat into void while it is being heated by the warmer parts of the earth further north, and the more northern parts of the Earth are being heated by the sun while they are losing heat to the colder parts further south, so it is entirely possible that thermal equilibrium could be reached with the ice walls as ice and more temperate climates existing northwards. Or perhaps thermal equilibrium has not been reached, and the magma under the earth is losing heat, but that the earth's crust is a good insulator and it stores an unimaginable amount of heat, so it will take thousands of millennia before it loses enough heat to solidify.
-David
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