A question on gravity

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Luke 22:35-38

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A question on gravity
« on: July 28, 2016, 11:55:20 AM »
This question is assuming the earth is round and gravity exists so don't come in here saying that the earth is flat and gravity is fake. I've been told that there's really no such thing as zero gravity in space. We're all just free falling. I was wondering if that was the case then does that mean the entire universe is falling through something? Or did I misheard and that only applies to orbits?
The Bible doesn't support a flat earth.

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sokarul

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2016, 02:00:08 PM »
This question is assuming the earth is round and gravity exists so don't come in here saying that the earth is flat and gravity is fake. I've been told that there's really no such thing as zero gravity in space. We're all just free falling. I was wondering if that was the case then does that mean the entire universe is falling through something? Or did I misheard and that only applies to orbits?

When people say zero gravity they usually mean microgravity. Astronauts in the ISS didn't feel gravity, thus the incorrect zero g term comes up, but they are actually under something like 70 percent of the gravity at sea level.
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Woody

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2016, 04:39:58 PM »
Just want to add everything,(at least all that has been observed) is orbiting something. 

An example when we launch something towards Mars.

It orbits the Earth
then the Sun
then Mars
If a craft misses Mars for some reason it will continue in an orbit around the Sun.
Of course you can say the craft is always orbiting the Sun.

You will always be affected by gravity just the strength of it changes.

Anything that is orbiting is falling around something. 

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Luke 22:35-38

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2016, 04:56:46 PM »
Just want to add everything,(at least all that has been observed) is orbiting something. 

An example when we launch something towards Mars.

It orbits the Earth
then the Sun
then Mars
If a craft misses Mars for some reason it will continue in an orbit around the Sun.
Of course you can say the craft is always orbiting the Sun.

You will always be affected by gravity just the strength of it changes.

Anything that is orbiting is falling around something.

So is the entire universe is falling?
The Bible doesn't support a flat earth.

Scripture, facts, science, stats, and logic is how I argue.

Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2016, 05:28:07 PM »
Sort of. Stars in galaxies are "falling" towards the super massive black hole in the center (with some unknowns we are still trying to figure out. But individual galaxies are sort of independant. Since gravity gets weaker at the square of distance, it fizzles out pretty quick.
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Ski

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2016, 05:35:35 PM »
I thought the world was rapidly expanding away from it's origin in globularism. Isn't that the opposite of falling?

"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2016, 05:39:18 PM »
individual galaxies are spreading out. But within galaxies, they are still "falling" towards the center.
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Ski

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2016, 05:56:26 PM »
The sun is losing millions of tons of mass per second according to thr orthodoxy. Wouldn't this lead to a larger orbit of planets?  Wouldn't this gradual increase also be the opposite of falling?
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2016, 05:57:58 PM »
when we say falling, we mean that there is no normal force keeping object up, rather, they are always in a "freefall" but are moving so fast that they miss the planet/sun/black hole.
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Ski

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2016, 06:06:30 PM »
So there is no normal force holding the moon up, but it is going outward from the direction it is "falling". Clear as mud.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2016, 06:10:34 PM »
It's in orbit. It is not going inward or outward, it is in a pretty good circle. I think you are purposefully misreading what I say.
I wonder how obnoxious I can make my signature?
Please give me ideas.

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Ski

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2016, 06:19:33 PM »
I think you'd better reread the Orthodoxy talking points. They seem to be convinced otherwise.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2016, 06:51:41 PM »
This question is assuming the earth is round and gravity exists so don't come in here saying that the earth is flat and gravity is fake. I've been told that there's really no such thing as zero gravity in space. We're all just free falling. I was wondering if that was the case then does that mean the entire universe is falling through something? Or did I misheard and that only applies to orbits?

When people say zero gravity they usually mean microgravity. Astronauts in the ISS didn't feel gravity, thus the incorrect zero g term comes up, but they are actually under something like 70 percent of the gravity at sea level.
Incorrect. Perfectly orbiting objects are in freefall. Its microgravity because its not 0g due to local mass etc. 70%?! lol. While the space station is affected supposedly by 90% of gravity compared to the surface it feels almost none of this due to it being in free fall.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2016, 06:54:18 PM by John Davis »

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Woody

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2016, 08:09:35 PM »
Just want to add everything,(at least all that has been observed) is orbiting something. 

An example when we launch something towards Mars.

It orbits the Earth
then the Sun
then Mars
If a craft misses Mars for some reason it will continue in an orbit around the Sun.
Of course you can say the craft is always orbiting the Sun.

You will always be affected by gravity just the strength of it changes.

Anything that is orbiting is falling around something.

So is the entire universe is falling?

Imagine throwing a ball on Earth.

When you release it it begins to slow down until it reaches its highest point.
When it passes that point it begins to accelerate towards the Earth until it hits the ground.

Now imagine throwing a ball in space near Earth.

It will behave the same way.

When it passes the lowest point of the orbit it is slowing down.

When it passes the highest it begins speeding up.

Throw it fast enough and it will continue to orbit. 

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sokarul

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2016, 08:51:01 PM »
This question is assuming the earth is round and gravity exists so don't come in here saying that the earth is flat and gravity is fake. I've been told that there's really no such thing as zero gravity in space. We're all just free falling. I was wondering if that was the case then does that mean the entire universe is falling through something? Or did I misheard and that only applies to orbits?

When people say zero gravity they usually mean microgravity. Astronauts in the ISS didn't feel gravity, thus the incorrect zero g term comes up, but they are actually under something like 70 percent of the gravity at sea level.
Incorrect.
Let's see.
Quote
Perfectly orbiting objects are in freefall.
Where did I say otherwise?
Quote
Its microgravity because its not 0g due to local mass etc.
Where did I say otherwise?
Quote
70%?! lol.
I didn't check my 70% number.

Quote
While the space station is affected supposedly by 90% of gravity compared to the surface it feels almost none of this due to it being in free fall.
Where did I say otherwise?

Well that was fun.
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UpstartPixel

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2016, 11:28:36 PM »
The sun is losing millions of tons of mass per second according to thr orthodoxy. Wouldn't this lead to a larger orbit of planets?  Wouldn't this gradual increase also be the opposite of falling?

You don't accept the nuclear fusion of the sun? That's odd. What's that got to do with FET? Or do you just reject most of mainstream physics per se?

Just curious.

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UpstartPixel

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2016, 11:30:02 PM »
This question is assuming the earth is round and gravity exists so don't come in here saying that the earth is flat and gravity is fake. I've been told that there's really no such thing as zero gravity in space. We're all just free falling. I was wondering if that was the case then does that mean the entire universe is falling through something? Or did I misheard and that only applies to orbits?

We are all falling towards the Great Attractor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Attractor

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Kami

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2016, 09:54:55 AM »
One might clear up the definition of falling here. Einstein pointed out that we are simply moving in straight lines through spacetime, which is curved by mass, so technically we are all falling (well, through the time-dimension).
We would not be able to feel earth's gravity, if there was not this huge object (the ground) stopping us.

So there might be points in space with zero-gravity (something equivalent to the lagrange-points, but with all stars and planets etc. combined), but one would not be able to measure it. The only thing that one can measure is the difference between your acceleration and the gravitational pull, which is zero when there is nothing stopping you.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: A question on gravity
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2016, 11:01:06 AM »
The sun is losing millions of tons of mass per second according to thr orthodoxy. Wouldn't this lead to a larger orbit of planets?  Wouldn't this gradual increase also be the opposite of falling?

You don't accept the nuclear fusion of the sun? That's odd. What's that got to do with FET? Or do you just reject most of mainstream physics per se?

Just curious.

The OP specifically said he wanted RE answers, not FE answers.  Flat Earthers know a lot of roundly answers, believe it or not.  ::)