hight of atmosphere

  • 13 Replies
  • 1555 Views
?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
hight of atmosphere
« on: February 12, 2012, 02:52:10 PM »
bit of a basic question but i just need to get my facts right.
how high is the atmosphere acording to the fes?
i mean do you accept the scientific method and you believe its the same hight as been documented? or is it unknown?
if anybody has some numbers it will be of great help for some things im working on
cheers

?

Archibald

  • 1082
  • mans reach exceeds his grasp
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2012, 02:54:15 PM »
It looks pretty high.
For whatever reason you allow Clocktower to derail any thread Archibald posts in.

*

Tom Bishop

  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 17837
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2012, 02:55:06 PM »
Pretty high.

?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2012, 03:05:09 PM »
i was about to say thanks... look im not trying to trap anybody here in this post. its a genuine question. would you say that the atmosphere COULD be as high as the stars? or is there a point where it ends?
could i reference the 'known' hight in my work and will this be accepted by the fes?

?

Archibald

  • 1082
  • mans reach exceeds his grasp
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2012, 03:08:25 PM »
i was about to say thanks... look im not trying to trap anybody here in this post. its a genuine question. would you say that the atmosphere COULD be as high as the stars? or is there a point where it ends?
could i reference the 'known' hight in my work and will this be accepted by the fes?

Why do you so insistently omit the letter e from the word height?  Is it a gang thing? 
For whatever reason you allow Clocktower to derail any thread Archibald posts in.

?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2012, 03:25:19 PM »
i was about to say thanks... look im not trying to trap anybody here in this post. its a genuine question. would you say that the atmosphere COULD be as high as the stars? or is there a point where it ends?
could i reference the 'known' hight in my work and will this be accepted by the fes?

Why do you so insistently omit the letter e from the word height?  Is it a gang thing?

im mistaken, i didnt know height was spelt differently to high and highest. i just checked i thought it could of been the english spelling or..... what the f***, why am i even explaining it to you! no need to be such a dick about it.
a simple " i dont actually know" would of done. if you cant answer the question then dont post anything

*

Rushy

  • 8971
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2012, 03:39:05 PM »

?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2012, 03:44:21 PM »
or is it unknown?

see that part? just say it if thats the case....

?

Archibald

  • 1082
  • mans reach exceeds his grasp
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2012, 03:44:33 PM »
i was about to say thanks... look im not trying to trap anybody here in this post. its a genuine question. would you say that the atmosphere COULD be as high as the stars? or is there a point where it ends?
could i reference the 'known' hight in my work and will this be accepted by the fes?

Why do you so insistently omit the letter e from the word height?  Is it a gang thing?

im mistaken, i didnt know height was spelt differently to high and highest. i just checked i thought it could of been the english spelling or..... what the f***, why am i even explaining it to you! no need to be such a dick about it.
a simple " i dont actually know" would of done. if you cant answer the question then dont post anything




I honestly thought you were doing it intentionally.  Sometimes web forum people partake in internet trends of unfortunate and petty nature.  Zetetically I have observed the atmosphere to be pretty high up.  That is all I know so that was my answer.  Other zetetics have submitted similiar responses most likely to implicitly promote a zetetic leaning.
For whatever reason you allow Clocktower to derail any thread Archibald posts in.

?

OrbisNonSufficit

  • 3124
  • I love Gasoline.
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2012, 03:48:09 PM »
bit of a basic question but i just need to get my facts right.
how high is the atmosphere acording to the fes?
i mean do you accept the scientific method and you believe its the same hight as been documented? or is it unknown?
if anybody has some numbers it will be of great help for some things im working on
cheers

The atmosphere just keeps getting more and more rarefied the higher you go.  At 60 miles up there will still be some atmosphere, but it is so thin that detecting it is near impossible.  In reality its best to think of where you can no longer breath.  Depending on how acclimated you are, 5-7 miles above sea level and you will find that the air is extremely thin.  You can breath there, but most people require oxygen tanks to do any sort of strenuous activity.  Anything much higher than that 10 miles or so, could kill you very quickly without oxygen.  Then you have the space boundry at 60 miles high, but by the time you get anywhere near there you are going to find nearly zero atmosphere.  Helium balloons are a good example, they really cannot go much higher than 20 miles because at that point the atmosphere is the same density as helium.

?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2012, 03:54:19 PM »
thank you both. sorry archie, i thought (well you did) you were just trolling me.
so just to wrap it up can use 60 miles at the end? if a helium balloon falls/pops at 20 miles its fair to say its getting less dense and even if the stars were in an atmosphere at 3100 miles it would be so thin it would be undetectable. to be fair it probably wouldnt be detectable at 100 miles then. this is all work towards my work on atmospheric density and the distances we can see. its slow progress but its something that interests me

?

OrbisNonSufficit

  • 3124
  • I love Gasoline.
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2012, 03:56:31 PM »
thank you both. sorry archie, i thought (well you did) you were just trolling me.
so just to wrap it up can use 60 miles at the end? if a helium balloon falls/pops at 20 miles its fair to say its getting less dense and even if the stars were in an atmosphere at 3100 miles it would be so thin it would be undetectable. to be fair it probably wouldnt be detectable at 100 miles then. this is all work towards my work on atmospheric density and the distances we can see. its slow progress but its something that interests me

The most common boundary for "space" is at 60 miles, so i think it would be fair to use it.

?

squevil

  • Official Member
  • 3184
  • Im Telling On You
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2012, 04:04:41 PM »
thank you both. sorry archie, i thought (well you did) you were just trolling me.
so just to wrap it up can use 60 miles at the end? if a helium balloon falls/pops at 20 miles its fair to say its getting less dense and even if the stars were in an atmosphere at 3100 miles it would be so thin it would be undetectable. to be fair it probably wouldnt be detectable at 100 miles then. this is all work towards my work on atmospheric density and the distances we can see. its slow progress but its something that interests me

The most common boundary for "space" is at 60 miles, so i think it would be fair to use it.

i just wanted to know if this was accepted by the flat earth believers aswell so my work has more credit

?

OrbisNonSufficit

  • 3124
  • I love Gasoline.
Re: hight of atmosphere
« Reply #13 on: February 13, 2012, 10:38:06 AM »
thank you both. sorry archie, i thought (well you did) you were just trolling me.
so just to wrap it up can use 60 miles at the end? if a helium balloon falls/pops at 20 miles its fair to say its getting less dense and even if the stars were in an atmosphere at 3100 miles it would be so thin it would be undetectable. to be fair it probably wouldnt be detectable at 100 miles then. this is all work towards my work on atmospheric density and the distances we can see. its slow progress but its something that interests me

The most common boundary for "space" is at 60 miles, so i think it would be fair to use it.

i just wanted to know if this was accepted by the flat earth believers aswell so my work has more credit

Well since gravitation is the same in both models it will work for both at 60 miles.