Some questions about stars

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Some questions about stars
« on: December 12, 2011, 06:30:58 AM »
I have a few follow up questions on some things I've read in the forums...

1. Regarding the South Celestial Pole. If all of the stars were in a "disc" above the Earth, there shouldn't be a South Celestial Pole; all stars should rotate approximately around Polaris. It has been said elsewhere in the forums that there are actually multiple discs that rotate independently; is this true?

2. If so, how many discs are there, and where are they centered?

3. Why do the discs appear to have the same stars? I've personally spotted the constellations Octans, Crux, and Pavo from multiple spots in the southern hemisphere. Is this a coincidence?

4. Are there multiple Alpha Centauris? Multiple Large Magellanic Clouds? When Supernova SN1987A happened in the LMC, did it happen in all copies of the LMC simultaneously?

5. Where does the "northern" disc end and the "southern" disc(s) begin?
1. "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." - Gandhi
2. I'm being ignored and laughed at
3. Therefore I'm right

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The Knowledge

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Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2011, 01:05:04 PM »
I have a few follow up questions on some things I've read in the forums...

1. Regarding the South Celestial Pole. If all of the stars were in a "disc" above the Earth, there shouldn't be a South Celestial Pole; all stars should rotate approximately around Polaris. It has been said elsewhere in the forums that there are actually multiple discs that rotate independently; is this true?

2. If so, how many discs are there, and where are they centered?

3. Why do the discs appear to have the same stars? I've personally spotted the constellations Octans, Crux, and Pavo from multiple spots in the southern hemisphere. Is this a coincidence?

4. Are there multiple Alpha Centauris? Multiple Large Magellanic Clouds? When Supernova SN1987A happened in the LMC, did it happen in all copies of the LMC simultaneously?

5. Where does the "northern" disc end and the "southern" disc(s) begin?

The only answer the FE'ers ever provide is to parrot "celestial gears" without any explanation of how this works, how it produces what we observe, why there aren't gaps between the gears etc. So don't expect a sensible answer.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Rushy

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Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2011, 01:26:56 PM »
The celestial gears are powered by two superconducting (Due to being in a radiation-void area of space they are estimated to be ~1 degree kelvin) magnets producing an electric and magnetic field which then produces rotational velocities. The gears are made a type of malachite that responds well to the Universal Acceleration field.

Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2011, 01:46:41 PM »
OK that's great, but how many are there? The FAQ has two completely contradictory maps - one has Antarctica on it* and thus might have a two-gear system with one over the South pole and one over the North pole, but what about the map where Antarctica is a ring around the planet?

if it is a two-gear system, that resolves questions 3 and 4, but where is the "seam"? If it's at the celestial equator, why don't we see constellations like Orion get pulled in half every night? The celestial equator goes right down the middle of Orion, so Betelgeuse should go north and Rigel should go south. instead it keeps its shape. how?

*this map, of course, raises more questions than it answers. if that map is indeed correct, then the sun's orbit could not be a circle; it would have to be an oddly-shaped figure-8 that switches from clockwise to counterclockwise every March. (and vice versa in September). also what's up with New Zealand? if it's below Antarctica, wouldn't it be much colder there?
1. "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." - Gandhi
2. I'm being ignored and laughed at
3. Therefore I'm right

*

Rushy

  • 8971
Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2011, 01:51:16 PM »
OK that's great, but how many are there? The FAQ has two completely contradictory maps - one has Antarctica on it* and thus might have a two-gear system with one over the South pole and one over the North pole, but what about the map where Antarctica is a ring around the planet?

if it is a two-gear system, that resolves questions 3 and 4, but where is the "seam"? If it's at the celestial equator, why don't we see constellations like Orion get pulled in half every night? The celestial equator goes right down the middle of Orion, so Betelgeuse should go north and Rigel should go south. instead it keeps its shape. how?

*this map, of course, raises more questions than it answers. if that map is indeed correct, then the sun's orbit could not be a circle; it would have to be an oddly-shaped figure-8 that switches from clockwise to counterclockwise every March. (and vice versa in September). also what's up with New Zealand? if it's below Antarctica, wouldn't it be much colder there?

The gear system is comprised of a 16 jewel, 56 gear system. Only six gears are noticeably visible. Two large gears rotate on the axial north and south pole (Not to be confused with magnetic north and south!) while four smaller gears are centered evenly on the equator.

Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2011, 01:51:47 PM »
OK that's great, but how many are there? The FAQ has two completely contradictory maps - one has Antarctica on it* and thus might have a two-gear system with one over the South pole and one over the North pole, but what about the map where Antarctica is a ring around the planet?

if it is a two-gear system, that resolves questions 3 and 4, but where is the "seam"? If it's at the celestial equator, why don't we see constellations like Orion get pulled in half every night? The celestial equator goes right down the middle of Orion, so Betelgeuse should go north and Rigel should go south. instead it keeps its shape. how?

*this map, of course, raises more questions than it answers. if that map is indeed correct, then the sun's orbit could not be a circle; it would have to be an oddly-shaped figure-8 that switches from clockwise to counterclockwise every March. (and vice versa in September). also what's up with New Zealand? if it's below Antarctica, wouldn't it be much colder there?
Please treat Irushwithscvs's posts here as mockery. Thanks.

FET really never speaks to this problem. Their Wiki did, as I recall, have a laughable entry on it; however, the Wiki is gone. I guess FES can't prevent backsliding these days. I suspect the Sun is setting on their days.
Keep it serious, Thork. You can troll, but don't be so open. We have standards

*

Rushy

  • 8971
Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2011, 01:53:05 PM »
OK that's great, but how many are there? The FAQ has two completely contradictory maps - one has Antarctica on it* and thus might have a two-gear system with one over the South pole and one over the North pole, but what about the map where Antarctica is a ring around the planet?

if it is a two-gear system, that resolves questions 3 and 4, but where is the "seam"? If it's at the celestial equator, why don't we see constellations like Orion get pulled in half every night? The celestial equator goes right down the middle of Orion, so Betelgeuse should go north and Rigel should go south. instead it keeps its shape. how?

*this map, of course, raises more questions than it answers. if that map is indeed correct, then the sun's orbit could not be a circle; it would have to be an oddly-shaped figure-8 that switches from clockwise to counterclockwise every March. (and vice versa in September). also what's up with New Zealand? if it's below Antarctica, wouldn't it be much colder there?
Please treat Irushwithscvs's posts here as mockery. Thanks.

FET really never speaks to this problem. Their Wiki did, as I recall, have a laughable entry on it; however, the Wiki is gone. I guess FES can't prevent backsliding these days. I suspect the Sun is setting on their days.

Your claims are unfounded and insulting to say the least.

?

The Knowledge

  • 2391
  • FE'ers don't do experiments. It costs too much.
Re: Some questions about stars
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2011, 04:13:25 PM »
OK that's great, but how many are there? The FAQ has two completely contradictory maps - one has Antarctica on it* and thus might have a two-gear system with one over the South pole and one over the North pole, but what about the map where Antarctica is a ring around the planet?

if it is a two-gear system, that resolves questions 3 and 4, but where is the "seam"? If it's at the celestial equator, why don't we see constellations like Orion get pulled in half every night? The celestial equator goes right down the middle of Orion, so Betelgeuse should go north and Rigel should go south. instead it keeps its shape. how?

*this map, of course, raises more questions than it answers. if that map is indeed correct, then the sun's orbit could not be a circle; it would have to be an oddly-shaped figure-8 that switches from clockwise to counterclockwise every March. (and vice versa in September). also what's up with New Zealand? if it's below Antarctica, wouldn't it be much colder there?
Please treat Irushwithscvs's posts here as mockery. Thanks.

FET really never speaks to this problem. Their Wiki did, as I recall, have a laughable entry on it; however, the Wiki is gone. I guess FES can't prevent backsliding these days. I suspect the Sun is setting on their days.

Your claims are unfounded and insulting to say the least.

And true.
Has your account been hacked by Archibald, or did you just decide to start trolling?
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.