Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)

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The stars are small and about 3100 miles from the earth's surface. The stars in the Northern Hemisphere rotate around the Northern Barycenter and the stars in the Southern Hemisphere rotate around the Southern Barycenter.

See: http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=49558.0


300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, or 300 sextillion stars in the universe and are all 3100 miles from the earths surface.

Discuss.
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2011, 11:26:08 AM »
Crickets.

This is the same guy that (quoted) from the fictional Wiki.

"Further EvidenceTom Bishop conclusively demonstrates that the earth is flat here:" http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=18114.msg319626#msg319626

The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2011, 11:57:53 AM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2011, 12:03:48 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

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Rushy

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2011, 12:25:11 PM »
They're all 2000 jiggawatt lightbulbs placed there by the same man that built the pyramids. Yeah, it was one man.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2011, 12:53:56 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?

Clearly not. They appear much larger than that in the night sky.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 01:07:15 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?

Clearly not. They appear much larger than that in the night sky.

No they don't. They look like pinpoints of light. So how big are they?
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2011, 01:26:44 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?

Clearly not. They appear much larger than that in the night sky.

No they don't. They look like pinpoints of light.
You can see atoms?  ???

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 01:28:00 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?

Clearly not. They appear much larger than that in the night sky.

No they don't. They look like pinpoints of light.
You can see atoms?  ???

I never suggested they were atoms. You suggested they were very small. To be that many in the same space they would have to be incredibly small.

Asking one more time since all questions here get avoided. HOW BIG ARE THE STARS.
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2011, 06:13:12 PM »
the faq should read 3100 Miles and beyond...

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The Knowledge

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2011, 07:10:52 PM »
the faq should read 3100 Miles and beyond...

No, the stars HAVE to be at almost the same distance from each other in FET otherwise travelling 1000 miles would result in differing angular distances between them, which does not noticeably happen.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2011, 07:28:35 PM »
the faq should read 3100 Miles and beyond...

No, the stars HAVE to be at almost the same distance from each other in FET otherwise travelling 1000 miles would result in differing angular distances between them, which does not noticeably happen.

Graphical aid for the above:

If the stars are that close to Earth, yet also "beyond", this effect would be visible. It's not.

Also, the FAQ claims that the stars are being "held" above Earth. Are you (iwanttobelieve) suggesting that "hold" extends infinitely "beyond"? If not, the farther stars would be constantly moving relatively closer, which they are not.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2011, 07:30:07 PM by zarg »
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2011, 07:55:06 PM »
They're obviously pretty small.

Obviously. LOL. That completely explains everything.

So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?

Clearly not. They appear much larger than that in the night sky.

And there's the problem, of course. If they are large enough to be visible 3100 miles away, there isn't enough room. Take the surface area of Earth, 510 million square kilometers, divide it by 300 sextillion, you get 1.7 picometers: the necessary average surface area of a star. The smallest atom is helium and has a diameter of 62 picometers.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2011, 07:56:52 PM by zarg »
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2011, 02:31:16 AM »
Sorry to interject, but if the stars are small and 3100 miles away (and beyond) etc ... what ARE they??

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2011, 05:23:51 AM »
So now the stars are the sizes of atoms?
You can see atoms?  ???
I never suggested they were atoms.

HOW BIG ARE THE STARS.
To be that many in the same space they would have to be incredibly small.
They're obviously pretty small.

Thanks for nothing.

FYI if you didn't know, ants are pretty small. I'm not going to tell you how small, just small.
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2011, 06:11:04 AM »
Sorry to interject, but if the stars are small and 3100 miles away (and beyond) etc ... what ARE they??

They have no idea, it was another complete fabrication.
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2011, 09:52:21 AM »
if the earth is flat,  why is it things disappear over the horizon?  what is on the other side of this "flat earth?"  if every star is that close to the earth, why is just one star, so big compared to the others? 
sitting in Kansas on highway I-70, watching cars, I notice the cars disappear, where do they go? If the earth was flat how does the weather go around the earth?  where is the edge of the earth? if the earth is flat or even on a plane,  there would have to be an edge?  what is holding the "edges together.


I believe, most of the people on this site, have nothing better to do except argue, so they come up with something to argue about.  The earth, physically, can not be flat, none of our scientist's works would all be correct. 

Also, if the earth were flat, I should be able to get on an airplane, look out the window and be able to see the whole world.  I cant!

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2011, 10:26:12 AM »
if the earth is flat,  why is it things disappear over the horizon?  what is on the other side of this "flat earth?"  if every star is that close to the earth, why is just one star, so big compared to the others? 
sitting in Kansas on highway I-70, watching cars, I notice the cars disappear, where do they go? If the earth was flat how does the weather go around the earth?  where is the edge of the earth? if the earth is flat or even on a plane,  there would have to be an edge?  what is holding the "edges together.


I believe, most of the people on this site, have nothing better to do except argue, so they come up with something to argue about.  The earth, physically, can not be flat, none of our scientist's works would all be correct. 

Also, if the earth were flat, I should be able to get on an airplane, look out the window and be able to see the whole world.  I cant!

You're not allowed to ask questions here. Any questions will just lead to "read the faq" and "lurk moar."
The FAQ needs updating to reflect the falsehood of the FAQ.

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Tausami

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2011, 12:58:11 PM »

The stars are small and about 3100 miles from the earth's surface. The stars in the Northern Hemisphere rotate around the Northern Barycenter and the stars in the Southern Hemisphere rotate around the Southern Barycenter.

See: http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=49558.0


300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, or 300 sextillion stars in the universe and are all 3100 miles from the earths surface.

Discuss.

I can actually give you a fairly accurate answer, but only if I can find a formula for size change with distance. A cursory google search shows no results.

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The Knowledge

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2011, 01:46:56 PM »

The stars are small and about 3100 miles from the earth's surface. The stars in the Northern Hemisphere rotate around the Northern Barycenter and the stars in the Southern Hemisphere rotate around the Southern Barycenter.

See: http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=49558.0


300,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, or 300 sextillion stars in the universe and are all 3100 miles from the earths surface.

Discuss.

I can actually give you a fairly accurate answer, but only if I can find a formula for size change with distance. A cursory google search shows no results.

I'm surprised you didn't try to claim this was either Argumentum ad hominem, George Spock Fallacy or reductio ad absurdum.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2011, 01:50:48 PM »
I already posted the math that shows how small one 300-septillionth the size of Earth is. You don't need another formula to tell you that that is far too small to be seen -- from ANY distance.
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

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Tausami

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2011, 02:41:19 PM »
I already posted the math that shows how small one 300-septillionth the size of Earth is. You don't need another formula to tell you that that is far too small to be seen -- from ANY distance.

What the hell are you talking about? I'd find the average size of a star to a viewer on the Earth, and use the aforementioned formula to determine its actual size. Are you trying to say that the stars visible in the night sky are too numerous to be visible in the night sky?

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2011, 04:21:49 PM »
Yes, they are too numerous to all simultaneously exist at a singular height of 3100 miles above a relatively stationary flat plane the size of Earth's surface.

And if some stars can be seen without the aid of a telescope, that means they are relatively enormous and all the other ones need to greatly be even smaller than the figure I posted in order to preserve the overall average.

Not only that, but we can observe that there are great distances between the stars as well.

What Tom Bishop and your FAQ are claiming is that most stars are absurdly small objects, many many times smaller than the smallest element ever discovered.
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

*

Tausami

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2011, 04:47:46 PM »
Yes, they are too numerous to all simultaneously exist at a singular height of 3100 miles above a relatively stationary flat plane the size of Earth's surface.

And if some stars can be seen without the aid of a telescope, that means they are relatively enormous and all the other ones need to greatly be even smaller than the figure I posted in order to preserve the overall average.

Not only that, but we can observe that there are great distances between the stars as well.

What Tom Bishop and your FAQ are claiming is that most stars are absurdly small objects, many many times smaller than the smallest element ever discovered.

Argumentum ad Verbosium is a logical fallacy (see, linearplane? I knew I'd find a way to work a logical fallacy into this)

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2011, 06:11:20 PM »
I sincerely hope you're joking.
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

*

Tausami

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2011, 06:31:12 PM »
It's possible that we're following two completely different trains of thought. I fail to see why it would be different between RET and FET. If you'd explain better, I might understand. Why would stars, to fit in the night sky, be smaller than they look?

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El Cid

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2011, 07:37:38 PM »
It's possible that we're following two completely different trains of thought. I fail to see why it would be different between RET and FET. If you'd explain better, I might understand. Why would stars, to fit in the night sky, be smaller than they look?
Denial.  You know that it's true.  Anywho, stars are billions of miles wide.

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zarg

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Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2011, 07:59:16 PM »
I fail to see why it would be different between RET and FET.

??? Did you even read this thread?

There's a huge difference because FET says all the stars are held in place by dark energy 3100 miles above the surface of Earth.

If they are all at the same height then they must all fit inside a 2-dimensional area equal to the surface area of Earth. Basic division and common sense proves that this would require stars to be impossibly small objects. See the problem?
Quote from: Cat Earth Theory
[Lord Wilmore's writings] are written the way a high schooler thinks an educated person should sound like.  The pathetic pseudo-academic writing can't hide the lack of any real substance.

Re: Every star in the universe is 3100 miles above the disc. (300 sextillion)
« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2011, 11:39:45 PM »
I still want to know what stars are supposed to BE in FE theory. Is it one of those mysteries that has yet to be explained in FET? Are they immortalized greek heroes, pixie dust, did NASA put them there to make people believe in outer space? I would just like to know what those "small" twinklling things actually are ...