Scientific observations of the Flat Earth

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Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« on: November 19, 2011, 04:49:13 PM »
Hello, I am Mr. Anon, and I'm kind of new here. I am familiar with many experienced physicist, and as a result here are some scientific observations I have made about the Flat Earth notion.

Gravity
First off, this is the biggest thorn in the FET in existance. Gravity has been proven; I have seen experiments that display very small forces between two masses. This poses a significant problem for the Flat Earth. Even a very thin disc the size of the Earth would have a mass large enough to fold itself into a sphere. The Flat Earth version of gravity, the proposed Universal Accelerator, simply does not work. Even at the creationist view that many Flat Earthers embody, where the Earth is only 6000 years old, the disc, accelerating constantly at 9.8m/s/s, would have long ago exceeded the speed of light. While this can be explained to an extent with relativistic effects, the result is that the rest of the universe would rapidly age compared to us, and as we approach the speed of light, the acceleration we feel would decrease. In addition, the energy required to maintain such an accelerator would be tremendous (I don't even want to calculate it, though I could, as I'd have to add the masses of the Earth, planets, and the Sun and Moons). In addition, the UA does not account for the observed slight decreases in acceleration that have occurred at higher altitudes.

Ice Wall/Antarctica
The Ice Wall also poses some challenges for the FET. There have been recorded journeys that have been made across the Antarctic continent, as well as some plane travels. In addition, the inside circumferance of such an Ice Wall would be far greater than the measured circumferance of Antartica, and also would contradict nautical journeys, where (going clockwise according to the North Pole) sailoirs would end up constantly turning West instead of East. I am aware of a second FET map, where Antarctica is still and island-continent, but this map severely distorts the Pacific Ocean, and also does not create any means of keeping water from spilling over the edge of the Earth.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 04:54:34 PM by Mr. Anon »

Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 11:44:51 AM »
Also consider the velocity of p and s waves through the earths core which indicate the consistency and density of its various constituent components. These waves are detected by sensors located on different sides of a round earth. On a flat earth these waves would remain undetected and these geophysical experiments would surely have failed.

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Tom Bishop

  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 17767
Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 11:52:29 AM »
Here's a scientific observation for you: Look out your window.

Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 12:10:13 PM »
I look out of the window, what do I see: not a RE, not a FE, but houses and hills.

Very scientific.

Thanks for enlighting us with your sheer genius, Sir Bishop.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 12:48:55 PM »
I looked out my window and my view was concealed by a large tree. Am I to conclude that the entire world beyond my view is covered by my tree?
« Last Edit: November 29, 2011, 03:19:31 PM by jraffield1 »
You, sir, can't comprehend the idea of bottoms.

Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 03:15:18 PM »
Here's a scientific observation for you: Look out your window.

What a worthless comment. You cannot tell the shape of a celestial object you are on by simply looking at it from the surface when it is 1.5 x 10^22 times as big as you are (assuming RE, however still insanely huge for FE, not sure if you FE'ers have agreed upon a volume of the earth for your theory yet, I'd be interested to see it, and the math behind it, once you guys do). Your statement neither proves nor disproves anything.

?

Archibald

  • 1082
  • mans reach exceeds his grasp
Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 05:24:53 PM »
Hello, I am Mr. Anon, and I'm kind of new here. I am familiar with many experienced physicist, and as a result here are some scientific observations I have made about the Flat Earth notion.

Gravity
First off, this is the biggest thorn in the FET in existance. Gravity has been proven; I have seen experiments that display very small forces between two masses. This poses a significant problem for the Flat Earth. Even a very thin disc the size of the Earth would have a mass large enough to fold itself into a sphere. The Flat Earth version of gravity, the proposed Universal Accelerator, simply does not work. Even at the creationist view that many Flat Earthers embody, where the Earth is only 6000 years old, the disc, accelerating constantly at 9.8m/s/s, would have long ago exceeded the speed of light. While this can be explained to an extent with relativistic effects, the result is that the rest of the universe would rapidly age compared to us, and as we approach the speed of light, the acceleration we feel would decrease. In addition, the energy required to maintain such an accelerator would be tremendous (I don't even want to calculate it, though I could, as I'd have to add the masses of the Earth, planets, and the Sun and Moons). In addition, the UA does not account for the observed slight decreases in acceleration that have occurred at higher altitudes.

Ice Wall/Antarctica
The Ice Wall also poses some challenges for the FET. There have been recorded journeys that have been made across the Antarctic continent, as well as some plane travels. In addition, the inside circumferance of such an Ice Wall would be far greater than the measured circumferance of Antartica, and also would contradict nautical journeys, where (going clockwise according to the North Pole) sailoirs would end up constantly turning West instead of East. I am aware of a second FET map, where Antarctica is still and island-continent, but this map severely distorts the Pacific Ocean, and also does not create any means of keeping water from spilling over the edge of the Earth.


Not being rude but I just finished adressing some of your concerns in other threads here in these most excellent upper fora.  A brief review of other threads should grant you at least rudimentary replies which we may then prdicate  further Q&A upon.  I also belive you mentioned something adressed in Earth not A Globe under the sphericity inevitable through semi-fluitdity chapter.  As for your review of the other FE model; the reason the water does not fall over  the edge is because there is no edge.  It is a model of the earth as an infinite plane.  Antartica is there as you like but the plane simply extends outward.  Many think of the universe as being infinite so this should be well within your imaginations reach.
For whatever reason you allow Clocktower to derail any thread Archibald posts in.

Re: Scientific observations of the Flat Earth
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2011, 06:02:58 AM »
And of course, in modern 21st century, no one has been able to go further than what we know (your famous FE maps).
A tad difficult to understand.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.