Equitorial problems

  • 2 Replies
  • 794 Views
Equitorial problems
« on: November 20, 2011, 09:31:12 AM »
At the Round Earth's magnetic equator, to travel east or west, one can simply move in one straight direction, without having to make slight curves or anything that you would on another part of the globe. However, on the Flat Earth, to travel around the equator one would have to constantly move in a curve. Thus, we can pretty accurately test the Flat Earth Theory by sailing or flying part way around the equator.

In addition, the geographic equator, according to the Flat Earth model, would be 31,473 km. However, its measured length is much larger, at 40,030 km.

Finally, the Sun, according to the FE model, travels in a circular motion around the equator. What force provides the centripetal acceleration? Especially considering the center of the circle that it makes would be some 300 miles above the North Pole, which is empty space. 

Re: Equitorial problems
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2011, 11:47:03 AM »
At the Round Earth's magnetic equator, to travel east or west, one can simply move in one straight direction, without having to make slight curves or anything that you would on another part of the globe. However, on the Flat Earth, to travel around the equator one would have to constantly move in a curve. Thus, we can pretty accurately test the Flat Earth Theory by sailing or flying part way around the equator.

In addition, the geographic equator, according to the Flat Earth model, would be 31,473 km. However, its measured length is much larger, at 40,030 km.

Finally, the Sun, according to the FE model, travels in a circular motion around the equator. What force provides the centripetal acceleration? Especially considering the center of the circle that it makes would be some 300 miles above the North Pole, which is empty space.

To add a little bit more to your argument... the radius at which the sun rotates above the Earth changes throughout the year, this violates the principle of angular momentum conservation as well.
You, sir, can't comprehend the idea of bottoms.

?

The Knowledge

  • 2391
  • FE'ers don't do experiments. It costs too much.
Re: Equitorial problems
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2011, 03:17:06 PM »
At the Round Earth's magnetic equator, to travel east or west, one can simply move in one straight direction, without having to make slight curves or anything that you would on another part of the globe. However, on the Flat Earth, to travel around the equator one would have to constantly move in a curve. Thus, we can pretty accurately test the Flat Earth Theory by sailing or flying part way around the equator.


This curvature would be detected by an inertial navigation system, such as used on aircraft, submarines etc. At the present time the FE'ers will not engage with this argument.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.