So, this is my first time here....

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2011, 03:12:50 PM »
We have physical evidence that the moon indeed has life1.  Periodically it even falls to earth2 due to aetheric currents3.  The weather system can be seen with the naked eye4.
There are four bold statements in that post, none of which seem to have any basis in reality. Would you mind posting evidence/links about these?
http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?action=search
http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/images_aa/Moon_phases.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_rain
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala
Research: Manna
I really can't see anything in those links that points to any of the four points listed above.
In fact, quite the opposite:
Quote
Both samples (from rainwater and from trees) produced the same kind of algae, indicating that the spores seen in the rainwater most probably came from local sources.
Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala#Official_report

Where is the physical evidence of life on the moon? (and that is just one of the four points)

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2011, 03:26:40 PM »
We have physical evidence that the moon indeed has life1.  Periodically it even falls to earth2 due to aetheric currents3.  The weather system can be seen with the naked eye4.
There are four bold statements in that post, none of which seem to have any basis in reality. Would you mind posting evidence/links about these?
http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?action=search
http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/images_aa/Moon_phases.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_rain
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala
Research: Manna
I really can't see anything in those links that points to any of the four points listed above.
In fact, quite the opposite:
Quote
Both samples (from rainwater and from trees) produced the same kind of algae, indicating that the spores seen in the rainwater most probably came from local sources.
Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala#Official_report

Where is the physical evidence of life on the moon? (and that is just one of the four points)
I guess you didn't read the whole link.

Quote
It was not until early 2006 that the colored rains of Kerala gained widespread attention when the popular media reported that Godfrey Louis and Santhosh Kumar of the Mahatma Gandhi University in Kottayam proposed a controversial hypothesis that the colored particles were extraterrestrial cells

Also review:  Book of the Dead by Charles Fort for hundreds (and likely thousands if you review his entire bibliography and his other works) of similar events.  Also note his statements concerning the explanations that come up often for this kinda stuff.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2011, 03:29:16 PM by John Davis »
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2011, 04:14:12 PM »
1.  The moon is self luminescent, by bioluminescent bacteria.  The weather system on the moon causes the phases you talk of.
2.  Our view of the night sky depends on how light is bent by the greater and lesser aetheric cycles.

1. If the moon was illuminated by bacteria, we would not always see the same plateau and valley formations. Bacteria is mobile, especially if there is a weather system on the moon.
-Which there isn't. No weather system can block light in such an organized and total fashion.
The atmosphere on the moon is extremely light.  This coupled with the predictable  forces that act on the moon make this very realistic.  Who would have thought the universe acts in an organized fashion? :/  Also total?  What do you mean?
Quote
2. If light was bent by aether currents, then we would see positions of stars shift relative to each other. This does not happen; instead, our entire point of reference shifts. Bendy light also does not sufficiently explain why some constellations are always visible north of the equator, but never in the south, and vice/versa. No amount of light bending can make that statement true on a flat earth
We aren't talking about bendy light. 

And of course an amount of "light bending" or rather, the path of the light being altered, can make it true on a flat earth.

1. What exactly is it that causes the phases you say? Is the opacity of the atmosphere? The fact that the bacteria regularly turn their luminescence on and off all across the moon? And you haven't yet addressed why we always see the same formations on the moon. How do these bacteria stay alive, and have enough excess energy to give off light for no discernible purpose?

2. I'd like to see some kind of visual showing how this is possible. Namely, how the path light can be altered so that the Southern Cross is visible at all times in the southern hemisphere but never in the north, and vice/versa for northern constellations like Ursa Minor. I don't believe this is possible, no matter how light is altered. But I'll give you the chance to prove me wrong. I'll even upload a template for you:



Place Crux and Ursa Minor somewhere in the sky, and show how the path of light is altered to make the statements true.

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2011, 04:18:47 PM »
1.  The moon is self luminescent, by bioluminescent bacteria.  The weather system on the moon causes the phases you talk of.
2.  Our view of the night sky depends on how light is bent by the greater and lesser aetheric cycles.

1. If the moon was illuminated by bacteria, we would not always see the same plateau and valley formations. Bacteria is mobile, especially if there is a weather system on the moon.
-Which there isn't. No weather system can block light in such an organized and total fashion.
The atmosphere on the moon is extremely light.  This coupled with the predictable  forces that act on the moon make this very realistic.  Who would have thought the universe acts in an organized fashion? :/  Also total?  What do you mean?
Quote
2. If light was bent by aether currents, then we would see positions of stars shift relative to each other. This does not happen; instead, our entire point of reference shifts. Bendy light also does not sufficiently explain why some constellations are always visible north of the equator, but never in the south, and vice/versa. No amount of light bending can make that statement true on a flat earth
We aren't talking about bendy light. 

And of course an amount of "light bending" or rather, the path of the light being altered, can make it true on a flat earth.

1. What exactly is it that causes the phases you say? Is the opacity of the atmosphere? The fact that the bacteria regularly turn their luminescence on and off all across the moon? And you haven't yet addressed why we always see the same formations on the moon. How do these bacteria stay alive, and have enough excess energy to give off light for no discernible purpose?

The same formations?  They aren't changing the geography of the moon.  Why would they?

The opacity of the weather indeed causes moon phases, not the opacity of the atmosphere.

They stay alive the same way anything else does.  Procreating and eating.

Quote
2. I'd like to see some kind of visual showing how this is possible. Namely, how the path light can be altered so that the Southern Cross is visible at all times in the southern hemisphere but never in the north, and vice/versa for northern constellations like Ursa Minor. I don't believe this is possible, no matter how light is altered. But I'll give you the chance to prove me wrong. I'll even upload a template for you:



Place Crux and Ursa Minor somewhere in the sky, and show how the path of light is altered to make the statements true.
Your template is unusable.  However, thank you for the effort.  I have an artist working on all the diagrams for my book, but I'll try to sketch something up in the next day or so (remind me if I forget!) to help you visualize this.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #34 on: October 28, 2011, 04:20:33 PM »
Where's your proof we have been to the moon and haven't found any bacteria lighting it up.

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2011, 04:23:57 PM »
Where's your proof we have been to the moon and haven't found any bacteria lighting it up.
Yeah, you are right, they only found wood.  In otherwords, its due to incompetence.  We are only lucky their wanton disregard this time didn't end in the death of American heros.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #36 on: October 28, 2011, 04:25:51 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #37 on: October 28, 2011, 04:31:05 PM »
If light radiated from the moon via bacteria, we would not see shadows on the moon, nor would we see its geography, is what I'm saying. We can see these shadows because the moon's surface reflects light from the sun according to its geography. Also, I didn't ask for why moon-bacteria stay alive, I ask how. What are their food sources, and from where do they gain energy and bioluminescent chemicals?

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2011, 04:31:29 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
No atmosphere on the moon?  I guess NASA screwed something else up.

Seriously though, the atmosphere on the moon is caused by the release of gases from within the core due to their breakdown.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2011, 04:34:20 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
No atmosphere on the moon?  I guess NASA screwed something else up.

Seriously though, the atmosphere on the moon is caused by the release of gases from within the core due to their breakdown.

Once again evidence????? do you have any or are you just assuming this to be true because of your preconceived notion that the earth is flat???

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2011, 04:35:10 PM »
If light radiated from the moon via bacteria, we would not see shadows on the moon, nor would we see its geography, is what I'm saying. We can see these shadows because the moon's surface reflects light from the sun according to its geography. Also, I didn't ask for why moon-bacteria stay alive, I ask how. What are their food sources, and from where do they gain energy and bioluminescent chemicals?
The reason we hypothesis that its life thats causing this illumination is due to the fallen matter from the sky as well as the effects of moonlight on living specimens.

Its quite likely that this is incorrect, and you are right to be cautious. Sadly, we don't have answers concerning their food sources, etc.  I imagine their food source would have to do with something on the moon.  If it is indeed life from another world it could take any form.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #41 on: October 28, 2011, 04:38:01 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
No atmosphere on the moon?  I guess NASA screwed something else up.

Seriously though, the atmosphere on the moon is caused by the release of gases from within the core due to their breakdown.

Once again evidence????? do you have any or are you just assuming this to be true because of your preconceived notion that the earth is flat???
Another source is the release of materials from within the moon rock.

These are known as outgassing and sputtering.  Feel free to look them up for the appropriate evidence.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2011, 04:40:19 PM »
Nothing to sustain life for shrimps or bacteria all over the Moon.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

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Thork

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2011, 04:41:48 PM »
Nothing to sustain life for shrimps or bacteria all over the Moon.
What is the moon made of? No one has ever been. Maybe the shrimp eat the moon itself?

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #44 on: October 28, 2011, 04:43:44 PM »
Ha ha ha.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2011, 04:47:11 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
No atmosphere on the moon?  I guess NASA screwed something else up.

Seriously though, the atmosphere on the moon is caused by the release of gases from within the core due to their breakdown.

Once again evidence????? do you have any or are you just assuming this to be true because of your preconceived notion that the earth is flat???
Another source is the release of materials from within the moon rock.

These are known as outgassing and sputtering.  Feel free to look them up for the appropriate evidence.

Sure i'll give you that without checking it. but how does that show that there are bacteria on the moon??? we have yet to find the actual bacteria on the moon

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #46 on: October 28, 2011, 04:50:55 PM »
If light radiated from the moon via bacteria, we would not see shadows on the moon, nor would we see its geography, is what I'm saying. We can see these shadows because the moon's surface reflects light from the sun according to its geography. Also, I didn't ask for why moon-bacteria stay alive, I ask how. What are their food sources, and from where do they gain energy and bioluminescent chemicals?
The reason we hypothesis that its life thats causing this illumination is due to the fallen matter from the sky as well as the effects of moonlight on living specimens.

Its quite likely that this is incorrect, and you are right to be cautious. Sadly, we don't have answers concerning their food sources, etc.  I imagine their food source would have to do with something on the moon.  If it is indeed life from another world it could take any form.

Thank you for your open-minded response. I'd like to point out that things falling from the sky does not mean they came from the moon. In fact, that would be extremely unlikely as there are no forces that would drag matter from the moon to the earth. It has been observed, however, that wind on earth is strong enough to pick up matter from someplace and drop it in the form of precipitation someplace else, shown by the incident where tiny frogs were found trapped in hailstones.

There is nothing special about moonlight that causes any measurable effect on living organisms. This is a myth that's been disproven many times over. In fact, when you point a spectrometer at the moon, you'll find that the spectral signatures are almost identical to those of the sun, confirming that moonlight is simply reflected sunlight.

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #47 on: October 28, 2011, 05:15:22 PM »
No life, no atmosphere on the Moon. No bacterias, no shrimps.

No evidence(as usual)!
No atmosphere on the moon?  I guess NASA screwed something else up.

Seriously though, the atmosphere on the moon is caused by the release of gases from within the core due to their breakdown.

Once again evidence????? do you have any or are you just assuming this to be true because of your preconceived notion that the earth is flat???
Another source is the release of materials from within the moon rock.

These are known as outgassing and sputtering.  Feel free to look them up for the appropriate evidence.

Sure i'll give you that without checking it. but how does that show that there are bacteria on the moon??? we have yet to find the actual bacteria on the moon
It doesn't and it shouldn't.  We were talking about the atmosphere on the moon.

Concerning lunar life the evidence is blood rain and manna.    I say bacteria because that is the most taken standpoint, but likely its a completely alien entity most likely closer to a fungus than a bacteria. 
If light radiated from the moon via bacteria, we would not see shadows on the moon, nor would we see its geography, is what I'm saying. We can see these shadows because the moon's surface reflects light from the sun according to its geography. Also, I didn't ask for why moon-bacteria stay alive, I ask how. What are their food sources, and from where do they gain energy and bioluminescent chemicals?
The reason we hypothesis that its life thats causing this illumination is due to the fallen matter from the sky as well as the effects of moonlight on living specimens.

Its quite likely that this is incorrect, and you are right to be cautious. Sadly, we don't have answers concerning their food sources, etc.  I imagine their food source would have to do with something on the moon.  If it is indeed life from another world it could take any form.

Thank you for your open-minded response. I'd like to point out that things falling from the sky does not mean they came from the moon. In fact, that would be extremely unlikely as there are no forces that would drag matter from the moon to the earth. It has been observed, however, that wind on earth is strong enough to pick up matter from someplace and drop it in the form of precipitation someplace else, shown by the incident where tiny frogs were found trapped in hailstones.

There is nothing special about moonlight that causes any measurable effect on living organisms. This is a myth that's been disproven many times over. In fact, when you point a spectrometer at the moon, you'll find that the spectral signatures are almost identical to those of the sun, confirming that moonlight is simply reflected sunlight.
I'm always happy to point out when one of my ideas is only that or to point out or admit when I'm wrong.  I would like to thank you for your general manners, as they are often lacking in this forum from outsiders.
 
I agree that in many cases things falling from the sky are from the ground.  Othertimes it may not be the case.  There are several examples documented in Charles Forts works of both.

Its a myth that has also had several scientific studies confirm it.  I also have monthly stomach ailments coinciding to the cycle of the moon.  In fact, I'm not the only one.  Studies have shown an increase in hospital visits for this stomach issues during and surrounding the full moon.    Of course my ailments could be coincidence, or due to something else like my natural cycle.  This seems unlikely however as I sleep a polyphasic sleep schedule very often.   
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #48 on: October 28, 2011, 05:20:44 PM »
ok i don't know much about blood rain just that it's red rain caused by dust or fungus in the air type thing but how do you know it's from the moon wouldn't the moon be red then???

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #49 on: October 28, 2011, 08:13:40 PM »
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #50 on: October 28, 2011, 09:20:14 PM »
The moon is red.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_eclipse
Actually the moon is the boring gray-white you normally see. This is from that same wikipedia page:

"The moon's surface appears red because the only sunlight available is refracted through the Earth's atmosphere on the edges of the earth"

It's the same effect that makes sunrises and sunsets appear red.

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #51 on: October 29, 2011, 08:36:56 AM »
We have physical evidence that the moon indeed has life1.  Periodically it even falls to earth2 due to aetheric currents3.  The weather system can be seen with the naked eye4.
There are four bold statements in that post, none of which seem to have any basis in reality. Would you mind posting evidence/links about these?
http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?action=search
http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/images_aa/Moon_phases.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_rain
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala
Research: Manna
I really can't see anything in those links that points to any of the four points listed above.
In fact, quite the opposite:
Quote
Both samples (from rainwater and from trees) produced the same kind of algae, indicating that the spores seen in the rainwater most probably came from local sources.
Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_rain_in_Kerala#Official_report

Where is the physical evidence of life on the moon? (and that is just one of the four points)
I guess you didn't read the whole link.

Quote
It was not until early 2006 that the colored rains of Kerala gained widespread attention when the popular media reported that Godfrey Louis and Santhosh Kumar of the Mahatma Gandhi University in Kottayam proposed a controversial hypothesis that the colored particles were extraterrestrial cells

Also review:  Book of the Dead by Charles Fort for hundreds (and likely thousands if you review his entire bibliography and his other works) of similar events.  Also note his statements concerning the explanations that come up often for this kinda stuff.
I read the whole link. I must admit that I hadn't heard about this phenomenon before and its pretty fascinating. However, it seems quite a stretch for the imagination to go from cell-like particles of extra-terrestrial origin (suggested but not proven and widely treated with skepticism due to insufficient proof) to bio-luminescent bacteria lighting up the moon in phases which perfectly replicate the phases that would be seen if the moon is simply acting as a reflector of sunlight. How is the moon bacteria idea more plausible/likely?

From a (very) little research it seems that their claim was that it came from a meteorite, not from the moon:
Quote
Louis also discovered that, hours before the first red rain fell, there was a loud sonic boom that
shook houses in Kerala. Only an incoming meteorite could have triggered such a blast, he claims.
This had broken from a passing comet and shot towards the coast, shedding microbes as it
travelled. These then mixed with clouds and fell with the rain. Many scientists accept that comets
may be rich in organic chemicals and a few, such as the late Fred Hoyle, the UK theorist, argued
that life on Earth evolved from microbes that had been brought here on comets. But most
researchers say that Louis is making too great a leap in connecting his rain with microbes from a
comet.
Taken from http://www.eyepod.org/Red-Rain.html

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #52 on: October 29, 2011, 08:56:18 AM »
The moon is red.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_eclipse
Actually the moon is the boring gray-white you normally see. This is from that same wikipedia page:

"The moon's surface appears red because the only sunlight available is refracted through the Earth's atmosphere on the edges of the earth"

It's the same effect that makes sunrises and sunsets appear red.
Looks red to me.  Yes, I know the round earth explanation of the moons colour.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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General Disarray

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #53 on: October 29, 2011, 09:11:13 AM »
John takes evidence that some life found on earth might have originated outside earth, and makes the giant leap to thinking that A) it came from the moon, and B) that it causes moonlight. No direct evidence for either of those two points.
You don't want to make an enemy of me. I'm very powerful.

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John Davis

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #54 on: October 29, 2011, 09:26:52 AM »
John takes evidence that some life found on earth might have originated outside earth, and makes the giant leap to thinking that A) it came from the moon, and B) that it causes moonlight. No direct evidence for either of those two points.
Its based largely off my other work.  It has to do with the processing of data of phenom from fortrean science sources and looking for patterns in their time, appearance, type, etc and their correlation to astronomical events.  In fact, I asked on this forum a while ago for some help processing it, but later decided I could do it fast enough myself.

I'm attempting now to pin down the location of a lunar fortrean phenom and hope to travel to what looks like is going to be South America to verify this.  Until then, you can just take it on the tenuous string or ignore it.  I have said quite a few times that this is a leap and that its just an idea.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #55 on: October 29, 2011, 10:59:54 AM »
Until then, you can just take it on the tenuous string or ignore it.  I have said quite a few times that this is a leap and that its just an idea.
To be fair, you did also state it as being backed up by physical evidence:
We have physical evidence that the moon indeed has life.  Periodically it even falls to earth due to aetheric currents.  The weather system can be seen with the naked eye.
My question, now that you are acknowledging it as a "leap and just an idea", is why not a more mainstream idea?

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #56 on: October 29, 2011, 11:57:07 AM »
Until then, you can just take it on the tenuous string or ignore it.  I have said quite a few times that this is a leap and that its just an idea.
To be fair, you did also state it as being backed up by physical evidence:
We have physical evidence that the moon indeed has life.  Periodically it even falls to earth due to aetheric currents.  The weather system can be seen with the naked eye.
My question, now that you are acknowledging it as a "leap and just an idea", is why not a more mainstream idea?
Now? 

We do have physical evidence.  I have already stated a case for it based off of physical evidence.   Read Charles Fort: The Book of the Damned where he in hundreds of places disproves the contentions of those claiming x fell from the sky, so x is from earth.

The same thing used to happen with meteorites.  People thought they came from the Earth.
Quantum Ab Hoc

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #57 on: October 29, 2011, 12:25:54 PM »
The moon is red.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_eclipse
Actually the moon is the boring gray-white you normally see. This is from that same wikipedia page:

"The moon's surface appears red because the only sunlight available is refracted through the Earth's atmosphere on the edges of the earth"

It's the same effect that makes sunrises and sunsets appear red.
Looks red to me.  Yes, I know the round earth explanation of the moons colour.

So what is the flat earth explanation of why the moon appears red during lunar eclipses, and not anytime else?

Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #58 on: October 29, 2011, 03:50:24 PM »
We do have physical evidence.
Your post on this was weak at best.
Quote
I have already stated a case for it based off of physical evidence.
Again, weak.
Quote
Read Charles Fort: The Book of the Damned where he in hundreds of places disproves the contentions of those claiming x fell from the sky, so x is from earth.
How would that be relevant? I never claimed that the red rain is caused by something from earth. What I actually said was that the people you referenced specifically claimed that it came from a meteorite. You seem to have made the leap to bioluminescent moon bacteria yourself. Sounds like something along the lines of X didn't come from Earth so Y came from the moon.
Quote
The same thing used to happen with meteorites.  People thought they came from the Earth.
People being incorrect about something in the past is not proof that they are incorrect about something now. Different times, different technologies available, different knowledge at their disposal, etc. This is a really weak case you have presented here. I cannot see how logic would bring anybody to the conclusions that you have drawn. I'm not trying to be smart or sarcastic here, I just can't understand your logic.

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areyouguysserious

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Re: So, this is my first time here....
« Reply #59 on: February 01, 2012, 04:09:34 PM »
Quote
The same formations?  They aren't changing the geography of the moon.  Why would they?


According to this site, the sun and the moon are both 32 miles in diameter. They are spotlights. I didn't know 32 mile spotlights had geography, or that they had bioluminescent life forms.
You have the right to believe in whatever you want. I also have the right to believe that you're a (Bleep)ing idiot!