Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?

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Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« on: October 12, 2011, 04:53:26 AM »
If the sun is a spotlight, shining directly at earth and nowhere else, why does mars "shine" like a star when we get to see it? Is NASA shining lights at it to get it to reflect light back at us in an attempt to keep the conspiracy going, or is it reflecting sunlight like the moon in the REal world?

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2011, 05:21:00 AM »
You, sir, assume that the sun is the only source of light.  Can you prove that shrimp are not the source of light on the sun or moon?  If not, then please lurk moar.  Read the EIaG.

[sirious now] 

The probable answer will be "it is a hoax propagated by the conspiracy!".

[/sirious now]

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The Knowledge

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2011, 10:34:31 AM »
I think this question needs to be addressed, to also include light falling on Venus.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2011, 10:52:31 AM »
Do you have evidence that "Mars", which we have never visited, is not a star?

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2011, 12:19:47 PM »
Do you have evidence that "Mars", which we have never visited, is not a star?
It isn't all NASA conspiracy people who identified Mars as a planet. I assume this is a joke, but just to humour you:
http://zuserver2.star.ucl.ac.uk/~rpif/mitc/mitcearly.html

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2011, 03:18:58 AM »
Do you have evidence that "Mars", which we have never visited, is not a star?
It isn't all NASA conspiracy people who identified Mars as a planet. I assume this is a joke, but just to humour you:
http://zuserver2.star.ucl.ac.uk/~rpif/mitc/mitcearly.html
lol

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squevil

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2011, 05:29:12 AM »
this is how its possible to see mars orbiting the sun and a good explanation that earth orbits the sun. the very name planet is given to mars because of this patturn. this proves mars is not a star.
http://web.cortial.net/bibliohtml/epiclc_ja.html

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2011, 09:18:13 AM »
Do you have evidence that "Mars", which we have never visited, is not a star?
It isn't all NASA conspiracy people who identified Mars as a planet. I assume this is a joke, but just to humour you:
http://zuserver2.star.ucl.ac.uk/~rpif/mitc/mitcearly.html
lol
Thank you. Anything to say that means something of relevance?

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2011, 09:30:00 AM »
mars gets its light from our spherical sun, just like the the other planets, and our moon. more evidence that the sun is not a spotlight

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2011, 08:54:07 PM »
I can't believe this is still being discussed.  There are countless experiments which show the sun is a DUAL spotlight, shining on the moon, mars, earth, and venus. It would be illogical to think that the earth would receive all of the suns light, not to mention contrary to virtually unlimited scientific evidence.  Furthermore, mars is itself a spotlight which is shining onto to earth only. It also contributes to the light reflected off of the moon.

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2011, 12:38:07 AM »
I can't believe this is still being discussed.  There are countless experiments which show the sun is a DUAL spotlight, shining on the moon, mars, earth, and venus. It would be illogical to think that the earth would receive all of the suns light, not to mention contrary to virtually unlimited scientific evidence.  Furthermore, mars is itself a spotlight which is shining onto to earth only. It also contributes to the light reflected off of the moon.

Do you have evidence of this? Provide links please?

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2011, 11:49:51 AM »
I have changed my mind about my previous post. If the moon was getting its light from the sun, then it wouldn't look white, it would look yellow like the light from the sun. This proves that the moon isn't getting its light from the sun and therefore must be flat, like the earth.

The same thing must go for mars. If the light we saw from mars was from the sun, then mars would look yellow instead of red because the sun is yellow. This means the the moon and mars must have separate but similar types of bioluminescent organisms on their surfaces. 

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The Knowledge

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2011, 02:14:50 PM »
I have changed my mind about my previous post. If the moon was getting its light from the sun, then it wouldn't look white, it would look yellow like the light from the sun. This proves that the moon isn't getting its light from the sun and therefore must be flat, like the earth.

The same thing must go for mars. If the light we saw from mars was from the sun, then mars would look yellow instead of red because the sun is yellow. This means the the moon and mars must have separate but similar types of bioluminescent organisms on their surfaces.

*holds up white object outdoors in sunlight*
Hmm, it can't be sunlight illuminating this white object because it looks white and not yellow.
*throws white object in trash*
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Nolhekh

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2011, 02:30:36 PM »
mars gets its light from our spherical sun, just like the the other planets, and our moon. more evidence that the sun is not a spotlight

So, why then does the full moon's illuminated side always face the ground?

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2011, 03:35:47 PM »
The Moon rotates around the Earth at exactly the same speed that it rotates around itself (probably a conspiracy, too).
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2011, 04:03:27 PM »
I have changed my mind about my previous post. If the moon was getting its light from the sun, then it wouldn't look white, it would look yellow like the light from the sun. This proves that the moon isn't getting its light from the sun and therefore must be flat, like the earth.

The same thing must go for mars. If the light we saw from mars was from the sun, then mars would look yellow instead of red because the sun is yellow. This means the the moon and mars must have separate but similar types of bioluminescent organisms on their surfaces.

*holds up white object outdoors in sunlight*
Hmm, it can't be sunlight illuminating this white object because it looks white and not yellow.
*throws white object in trash*

You apparantly havnt been outside in a while. If yellow light hits something that is white, how is it possible that white light bounces off when you only have yellow light in the first place. Maybe think a little bit next time before you make a post.

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The Knowledge

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2011, 06:52:59 PM »
I have changed my mind about my previous post. If the moon was getting its light from the sun, then it wouldn't look white, it would look yellow like the light from the sun. This proves that the moon isn't getting its light from the sun and therefore must be flat, like the earth.

The same thing must go for mars. If the light we saw from mars was from the sun, then mars would look yellow instead of red because the sun is yellow. This means the the moon and mars must have separate but similar types of bioluminescent organisms on their surfaces.

*holds up white object outdoors in sunlight*
Hmm, it can't be sunlight illuminating this white object because it looks white and not yellow.
*throws white object in trash*

You apparantly havnt been outside in a while. If yellow light hits something that is white, how is it possible that white light bounces off when you only have yellow light in the first place. Maybe think a little bit next time before you make a post.

Let me get this straight: you claim the sun's light is yellow.
Now you get this straight: explain the presence of things that look white when lit by the sun.
Then see Thork or Tom for lessons on how to troll less pathetically.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Vindictus

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2011, 01:55:55 AM »
We have never been to Mars, so we can not be sure.

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2011, 02:01:19 AM »
Numerous probes have been sent to Mars.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

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Parsifal

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2011, 03:55:42 AM »
Bendy light removes the requirement for the Sun to behave as a spotlight. It is entirely possible that Mars is simply reflecting sunlight.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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Son of Orospu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2011, 04:35:15 AM »
So, why then does the full moon's illuminated side always face the ground?

It doesn't.  We only see the illuminated side when it is facing the ground.  I don't understand how someone could not understand the round earth concept.

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Nolhekh

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2011, 07:39:31 AM »
So, why then does the full moon's illuminated side always face the ground?

It doesn't.  We only see the illuminated side when it is facing the ground.  I don't understand how someone could not understand the round earth concept.
irrelevent.  We're discussing the flat earth concept.  I understand the round earth concept quite well, thank you.

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2011, 05:24:23 AM »
Bendy light removes the requirement for the Sun to behave as a spotlight. It is entirely possible that Mars is simply reflecting sunlight.
Or, to put it another way, the sun is only is spotlight when we want it to be a spotlight. Once this is shown to be ridiculous, we'll use bendy light as the explanation. Once that has been shown to be ridiculous, we'll go back to the spotlight in the hope that everyone has forgotten about how wrong it seemed before.

Can you please provide a link to some experiment that has shown your bendy light in action? In order to buy in to this FE rubbish, don't you need to observe things yourself before you believe them? How did you zetetically come to the conclusion that light bends?

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2011, 05:39:19 AM »

Can you please provide a link to some experiment that has shown your bendy light in action? In order to buy in to this FE rubbish, don't you need to observe things yourself before you believe them? How did you zetetically come to the conclusion that light bends?
The moon clearly looks flat, and yet it appears circular from every angle. This conclusively proves the existence of bendy moonlight.

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2011, 05:55:08 AM »

Can you please provide a link to some experiment that has shown your bendy light in action? In order to buy in to this FE rubbish, don't you need to observe things yourself before you believe them? How did you zetetically come to the conclusion that light bends?
The moon clearly looks flat, and yet it appears circular from every angle. This conclusively proves the existence of bendy moonlight.
Well that's not worth responding to....DAMMIT I RESPONDED!!
That is one nonsensical post you made right there...

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2011, 06:16:23 AM »

Can you please provide a link to some experiment that has shown your bendy light in action? In order to buy in to this FE rubbish, don't you need to observe things yourself before you believe them? How did you zetetically come to the conclusion that light bends?
The moon clearly looks flat, and yet it appears circular from every angle. This conclusively proves the existence of bendy moonlight.
Well that's not worth responding to....DAMMIT I RESPONDED!!
That is one nonsensical post you made right there...
Pot. Black. Kettle.

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markjo

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #26 on: October 18, 2011, 06:28:44 AM »
The moon clearly looks flat, and yet it appears circular from every angle. This conclusively proves the existence of bendy moonlight.

Or, it could be shape that looks like a circle from every angle.  Something like...  Oh, I don't know.  Maybe a sphere.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #27 on: October 18, 2011, 06:37:21 AM »
The moon clearly looks flat, and yet it appears circular from every angle. This conclusively proves the existence of bendy moonlight.

Or, it could be shape that looks like a circle from every angle.  Something like...  Oh, I don't know.  Maybe a sphere.
???
But spheres don't look flat!

Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #28 on: October 18, 2011, 06:45:07 AM »
You live on a sphere which looks flat.
“The Earth looks flat, therefore it is” FEers wisdom.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: Mars looks like a star; Where does the light come from?
« Reply #29 on: October 18, 2011, 06:48:19 AM »
You live on a sphere which looks flat.
I live on a giant flat disc. Speak for yourself.