The moon

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PizzaPlanet

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Re: The moon
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2011, 09:04:44 AM »
If you don't enjoy the battle, why are you on the battlefield?  Perhaps it never occurred to you, but I'm hoping they do bring up their bendy light or Rawbottom perspective.  "Cry Havoc, and let slip the dogs of war"....
Or, perhaps, God forbid, the moon is rotating.
hacking your precious forum as we speak 8) 8) 8)

Re: The moon
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2011, 09:15:29 AM »
If you don't enjoy the battle, why are you on the battlefield?  Perhaps it never occurred to you, but I'm hoping they do bring up their bendy light or Rawbottom perspective.  "Cry Havoc, and let slip the dogs of war"....
Or, perhaps, God forbid, the moon is rotating.
If you mean, it is a flat disc rotating such that the flat side always faces us even as it approaches the horizon, then at some point, someone in a different location will see it almost edge on??  Perhaps I am misunderstanding you, please explain your point more thoroughly.

First human spacewalker, Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov: “Lifting my head I could see the curvature of the Earth's horizon. ’So the world really is round,’ I said softly to myself, as if the words came from somewhere deep in my soul. "

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #32 on: October 12, 2011, 12:56:38 PM »
Since the moon is a thin, flat disc, one would not see the far side of the moon from anywhere on earth.

If the moon is a flat disc not much more than 3000 miles above the surface, why does it always appear circular regardless of the location it's observed from?
Bendy light. If it was round, it would begin to look flat as it approached the horizon.

Nonsense. Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

Re: The moon
« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2011, 01:45:25 PM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.

Re: The moon
« Reply #34 on: October 12, 2011, 08:06:19 PM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.
This is a mirage affect.

http://kingeider.blogspot.com/2011/03/super-moon-in-mirage.html

It only happens occasionally, and the phenomena is insufficient to explain a flat earth moon setting which more than 90% of the time does not set in this distorted shape.

First human spacewalker, Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov: “Lifting my head I could see the curvature of the Earth's horizon. ’So the world really is round,’ I said softly to myself, as if the words came from somewhere deep in my soul. "

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2011, 12:21:01 AM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.
This is a mirage affect.

http://kingeider.blogspot.com/2011/03/super-moon-in-mirage.html

It only happens occasionally, and the phenomena is insufficient to explain a flat earth moon setting which more than 90% of the time does not set in this distorted shape.


That only occurs when you are at high altitude. Othewise, bendy light accounts for the round shape.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2011, 06:25:18 AM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.
This is a mirage affect.

http://kingeider.blogspot.com/2011/03/super-moon-in-mirage.html

It only happens occasionally, and the phenomena is insufficient to explain a flat earth moon setting which more than 90% of the time does not set in this distorted shape.


That only occurs when you are at high altitude. Othewise, bendy light accounts for the round shape.

How can light moving perpendicular to the moon's surface manage to bend in all directions at once?

Also, in believing bendy light, what evidence do you accept that suggests the flatness of the earth?

Re: The moon
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2011, 06:58:11 AM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.
This is a mirage affect.

http://kingeider.blogspot.com/2011/03/super-moon-in-mirage.html

It only happens occasionally, and the phenomena is insufficient to explain a flat earth moon setting which more than 90% of the time does not set in this distorted shape.


That only occurs when you are at high altitude. Othewise, bendy light accounts for the round shape.
Um.. it's a well known and well documented phenomena, photographed and observed at ground level more often than at height.  You also get the same effect on the sun. 

First human spacewalker, Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov: “Lifting my head I could see the curvature of the Earth's horizon. ’So the world really is round,’ I said softly to myself, as if the words came from somewhere deep in my soul. "

*

Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2011, 07:13:28 AM »
It does flatten out as it goes over the horizon.  Flattens quite a bit.  One has to be high up to see it though.  I was flying to Korea at night and watched the moon set.  The extra amount of atmosphere I was looking at it through also made it look increasingly red the closer it got to the the horizon.  Also, no, I couldn't see the horizon itself, it was night.
As you go higher the moon begins to look squashed, I know. That's because it's flat.
Actually it looked round for quite a while.  It wasn't until it was close to the horizon that it began to take on a red tint and then squish down.  The width still being the same of course.  Once it started to flatten, it didn't take very long to become almost completely flattened while fading away.

It didn't have a perfect oval shape either as one would expect when looking at a disk from different angles.  The bottom started to flatten first while the top retained more of a curve.
This is a mirage affect.

http://kingeider.blogspot.com/2011/03/super-moon-in-mirage.html

It only happens occasionally, and the phenomena is insufficient to explain a flat earth moon setting which more than 90% of the time does not set in this distorted shape.


That only occurs when you are at high altitude. Othewise, bendy light accounts for the round shape.
Um.. it's a well known and well documented phenomena, photographed and observed at ground level more often than at height.  You also get the same effect on the sun. 


That's just a mirage. In this series of pictures, taken from a high-altitude balloon, with the image on the left being taken from the highest altitude, you can observe the changing perspective on the moon from a rising object.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #39 on: October 13, 2011, 07:18:38 AM »
How can light moving perpendicular to the moon's surface manage to bend in all directions at once?
??? The moonshrimp give out light in all directions. What do you mean by this statement?

Also, in believing bendy light, what evidence do you accept that suggests the flatness of the earth?
The Bedford level experiment. Light only bends over long distances (e.g. between the moon and the earth) and would not have affected Rowbotham's findings.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #40 on: October 13, 2011, 08:12:03 AM »
How can light moving perpendicular to the moon's surface manage to bend in all directions at once?
??? The moonshrimp give out light in all directions. What do you mean by this statement?

Also, in believing bendy light, what evidence do you accept that suggests the flatness of the earth?
The Bedford level experiment. Light only bends over long distances (e.g. between the moon and the earth) and would not have affected Rowbotham's findings.
For the moon to look circular, the light coming off of it would have to travel normal to the surface of the moon, then bend towards whatever observer is watching it.  But it would have to bend in all directions at once, so that observers everywhere see a circular moon.  Also the bending required for the moon to appear at the horizon directly due east or west without diminishing in size does require a vertical curve whose magnitude is comparable to that of the supposed curvature of Round Earth, plus a horizontal bend so that the moon appears east or west despite really being located slightly north.  Given this case, rowbotham's observations either disprove both RET and bendy light, or are inconclusive due to the possibility of light-bending phenomena.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #41 on: October 13, 2011, 08:48:35 AM »
How can light moving perpendicular to the moon's surface manage to bend in all directions at once?
??? The moonshrimp give out light in all directions. What do you mean by this statement?

Also, in believing bendy light, what evidence do you accept that suggests the flatness of the earth?
The Bedford level experiment. Light only bends over long distances (e.g. between the moon and the earth) and would not have affected Rowbotham's findings.
For the moon to look circular, the light coming off of it would have to travel normal to the surface of the moon, then bend towards whatever observer is watching it.  But it would have to bend in all directions at once, so that observers everywhere see a circular moon.  Also the bending required for the moon to appear at the horizon directly due east or west without diminishing in size does require a vertical curve whose magnitude is comparable to that of the supposed curvature of Round Earth, plus a horizontal bend so that the moon appears east or west despite really being located slightly north.  Given this case, rowbotham's observations either disprove both RET and bendy light, or are inconclusive due to the possibility of light-bending phenomena.

There. I drew you a bendy-light diagram. Satisfied?

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #42 on: October 13, 2011, 08:54:20 AM »
the distance between the bent light rays in your diagram is still smaller than the actual width of the moon.  This means the moon is squishing into an ellipse.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #43 on: October 13, 2011, 08:55:06 AM »
the distance between the bent light rays in your diagram is still smaller than the actual width of the moon.  This means the moon is squishing into an ellipse.
But I deliberately put the ends of the rays the same distance apart.  >:(

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #44 on: October 13, 2011, 09:05:29 AM »
the distance between the bent light rays in your diagram is still smaller than the actual width of the moon.  This means the moon is squishing into an ellipse.
But I deliberately put the ends of the rays the same distance apart.  >:(
Yes, but the image resolves perpendicular to the light rays, so the perpendicular distance between them is the important distance.  Where the light rays end is irrelevant

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2011, 09:06:24 AM »
the distance between the bent light rays in your diagram is still smaller than the actual width of the moon.  This means the moon is squishing into an ellipse.
But I deliberately put the ends of the rays the same distance apart.  >:(
Yes, but the image resolves perpendicular to the light rays, so the perpendicular distance between them is the important distance.  Where the light rays end is irrelevant
Evidence?

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2011, 09:11:34 AM »
It's called geometry and perspective.  Images resolve perpendicular to the vector in which light enters your eye.  The proof is that you can't see change in depth with your eye, only horizontal and vertical movement.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #47 on: October 13, 2011, 09:23:32 AM »

Here, I see your MS Paint diagram, and raise you a Blender and Photoshop diagram.

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #48 on: October 13, 2011, 09:41:10 AM »
Nonsense. Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.

This applies to you too Nolhekh. Is my post invisible or something? Bendy light was disproved months and months ago. The stars don't obey the "rules" of bendy light, disproving it. All this debate is hot air.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #49 on: October 13, 2011, 09:47:29 AM »
Nonsense. Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.

This applies to you too Nolhekh. Is my post invisible or something? Bendy light was disproved months and months ago. The stars don't obey the "rules" of bendy light, disproving it. All this debate is hot air.

Doesn't matter, Xenu is still invoking bendy light.  I don't really care if it's been disproven months ago.  As far as I'm concerned the earth was proven round years ago, yet here we are still arguing with the flat earthers.  I will argue with those who's claims I feel lack support, using whatever technique or argument I feel are appropriate.  If Xenu happens to be deliberately ignorant of the thread in question, that isn't really my problem.

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #50 on: October 13, 2011, 09:57:56 AM »
Nonsense. Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.

This applies to you too Nolhekh. Is my post invisible or something? Bendy light was disproved months and months ago. The stars don't obey the "rules" of bendy light, disproving it. All this debate is hot air.

Doesn't matter, Xenu is still invoking bendy light.  I don't really care if it's been disproven months ago.  As far as I'm concerned the earth was proven round years ago, yet here we are still arguing with the flat earthers.  I will argue with those who's claims I feel lack support, using whatever technique or argument I feel are appropriate.  If Xenu happens to be deliberately ignorant of the thread in question, that isn't really my problem.

I get where you're coming from, I was just expressing the opinion that Xenu could be made to look stupid with much less effort on your part, saving you time and all that.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #51 on: October 13, 2011, 10:04:36 AM »
Making people look stupid is a poor goal in a debate.  If someone makes himself look stupid because he's a troll, that's his own fault.  If he really doesn't understand what I'm talking about, I'm only happy to try to explain my point as well as I can.

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #52 on: October 13, 2011, 10:29:09 AM »
Making people look stupid is a poor goal in a debate.  If someone makes himself look stupid because he's a troll, that's his own fault.  If he really doesn't understand what I'm talking about, I'm only happy to try to explain my point as well as I can.

No, the goal is not to crush his argument by reason of his stupidity - that is a logical fallacy. Even the very stupid person may pitch a totally correct argument. It is more to show that his argument is so far wrong that his very act of using it at all indicates his brain cells didn't have breakfast this morning.
Anyone who uses bendy light as an explanation is defining themselves either as a troll, or someone who doesn't understand what bendy light even predicts in terms of what you'd see - therefore, that person should not be trying to use it as an explanation because they should be aware that they don't understand it.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #53 on: October 13, 2011, 10:31:26 AM »

Here, I see your MS Paint diagram, and raise you a Blender and Photoshop diagram.
That is an excellent diagram, and you have successfully backed my Flat Moon Theory. I commend you, sir.

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #54 on: October 13, 2011, 10:33:41 AM »

Here, I see your MS Paint diagram, and raise you a Blender and Photoshop diagram.
That is an excellent diagram, and you have successfully backed my Flat Moon Theory. I commend you, sir.

This diagram has been disproved.
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #55 on: October 13, 2011, 10:34:35 AM »

Here, I see your MS Paint diagram, and raise you a Blender and Photoshop diagram.
That is an excellent diagram, and you have successfully backed my Flat Moon Theory. I commend you, sir.

This diagram has been disproved.
How so? Even REers are backing it now.

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The Knowledge

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Re: The moon
« Reply #56 on: October 13, 2011, 10:35:33 AM »
Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.

*sigh*
Watermelon, Rhubarb Rhubarb, no one believes the Earth is Flat, Peas and Carrots,  walla.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #57 on: October 13, 2011, 10:39:11 AM »
Why are people still trying to explain things with bendy light when it's been totally disproved? Bendy light doesn't work, Xenu. You should read the forum a bit more thoroughly.

*sigh*
You're using quotes from yourself as a source now? In my opinion, no REer has been able to convincingly disprove bendy light. Just saying "read the forum lol" is not evidence.

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Nolhekh

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Re: The moon
« Reply #58 on: October 13, 2011, 11:10:55 AM »
My question still stands, how can light bend in all directions at once?  This is what my diagram is trying to illustrate.  four examples of two light rays emerging from the same initial light ray.  In reality, they would be bending in literally as many directions as you have photons.

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Lord Xenu

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Re: The moon
« Reply #59 on: October 13, 2011, 11:16:19 AM »
My question still stands, how can light bend in all directions at once?

In reality, they would be bending in literally as many directions as you have photons.

You've basically answered your own question. It depends on the direction in which the photons are initially travelling.