Where is the Higgs Boson?

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Trekky0623

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Where is the Higgs Boson?
« on: August 24, 2011, 02:33:05 PM »

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Thork

Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2011, 02:39:10 PM »
UA?

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Vindictus

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2011, 02:41:31 PM »
Is Hawking a troll or what?

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Lorddave

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2011, 06:18:37 PM »
I'm rather disappointed but such is life.  Science at least can admit when it's wrong.
I am a terrible person and I am a typical Blowhard Liberal for being wrong about Bom.

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General Disarray

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You don't want to make an enemy of me. I'm very powerful.

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Ski

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2011, 08:00:31 PM »
They simply need more tax-dollars... That's how science works.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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Chris Spaghetti

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2011, 04:35:37 AM »
I'm rather disappointed but such is life.  Science at least can admit when it's wrong.

Why dissapointed? It could completely rewrite what we accept to be the 'standard model' of physics, very exciting stuff.

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Thork

Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2011, 04:41:00 AM »
Is it the right time to submit our theories on UA? Now they have no answers perhaps they will listen?

Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2011, 05:49:36 AM »
Is it the right time to submit our theories on UA? Now they have no answers perhaps they will listen?

There are other theories.
Quote from: Tom Bishop
If you don't know, whenever you talk about it you're invoking the supernatural
Quote from: Tom Bishop
Unknown != Magic.

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Thork

Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2011, 06:09:58 AM »
But UA is the best. :D

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Chris Spaghetti

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2011, 06:29:55 AM »
The problem is getting them to accept a Flat Earth  If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

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Ryan Onessence

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2011, 12:16:13 AM »
imo...what people think of as the universe is but one single cosmos, in a far more diverse multi-cosmos universe.
Thus they will never find the god/mass particle that unifies the theories that are currently worked with in one specific cosmos as the universes processes span a wider range of existence.
http://soundcloud.com/orin-zolis/sets/world-music-ethnic-beats/

Knowledge gained via academic means and intelligence are not mutually inclusive. Those who assume authority and superiority over conventionally uneducated persons would be wiser to keep this in mind.

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EnigmaZV

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2011, 01:44:33 PM »
imo...what people think of as the universe is but one single cosmos, in a far more diverse multi-cosmos universe.
Thus they will never find the god/mass particle that unifies the theories that are currently worked with in one specific cosmos as the universes processes span a wider range of existence.

Then what do you suppose causes particles to have mass?
I don't know what you're implying, but you're probably wrong.

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Ryan Onessence

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2011, 03:16:55 PM »
Quote from: EnigmaZV link=topic=50212.msg1235631#msg1235631
date=1314391473
Quote from: Ryan Onessence link=topic=50212.msg1235210#msg1235210
date=1314342973
imo...what people think of as the universe is but one single cosmos, in
a far more diverse multi-cosmos universe.
Thus they will never find the god/mass particle that unifies the
theories that are currently worked with in one specific cosmos as the
universes processes span a wider range of existence.

Then what do you suppose causes particles to have mass?

fractal infinity which has a depth charge inside a defined space i.e. the "particles defined space" space has no quantified measurement so it (space) can shrink into itself infinitely from any arbitrary point, so the quicker the rate of infinite depth the greater the mass, then again it could be the other way round the slower the rate the greater the mass.
I would say the later makes more sense in context of conventional thinking but there are other ways that the former could be true as well... it depends on the rate of depth charge of the region of cosmic
space that the particle is within...but the point being is its fractal, so one can't find a determinate "particle" or cause that applies indefinitely across the board.

Fractals are self similar in a progressive shrinking or expanding sense, so if you take data from one level and apply it to another level the data has to be mathematically recalibrated to fit the requirements for that level.
The depth charge of a cosmos is not a stable rate it changes according to the environment of the fractal layers above and below (which themselves are not static)...Its always expanding inwards i.e. shrinking into greater depth without loss of resolution, the rate by which it does however, can increase or decrease in accordance with the depth charge of the environment of the fractal level above.
Observers cannot detect this with 5 physical senses as all things shrink in relation to each other.
The indeterminate rate is what accounts for why quantum physicists cannot predict where a particles data will appear in the quantum wave function when measuring.

Every cosmos is like an atom in its function...the same way that an atom acquires electrons from outside and becomes another element i.e. vibrates quicker "gains mass". However the cosmotic environment within does not change, depth charge as stated is experienced relatively however the speed at which inward expansion occurs varies according to how much energy the cosmos has i.e. how fast its depth charge (Dch) flows.
   
So regarding particles, it could be said that a particles Dch could be at an equal ratio to the cosmos it exists within...like playing a musical chord of the Octave i.e. C4 and C5...therefore a particle of
this nature will not change in size relative to the cosmos' Dch rate....
But the cosmos is always becoming greater in depth i.e. its volume of space and things, its only the speed at which it is becoming deeper (expanding) which changes.
So not all particles can be entrained to the fundamental frequency of the cosmos as an exact octave integer as tho they are a static size if there are many different kinds, they all must have ratios that are not exact integers of the cosmos Dch, but rather tertiary harmonics such as 1/3, 1/5 ,1/6...of which they themselves can either be quicker or slower than the fundamental (f) Dch of the cosmos at any given time according to how much energy they have - remember the gain or loss in electrons analogy as determining what element an atom will be. Well if a particle vibrates faster than the f Dch of the cosmos then it will gain mass...if the cosmos speeds up exceeding the particles dch it will lose mass if it continues to vibrate at that same Dch...the cosmos however, as it gains mass (increases Dch) as a whole, distributes the energy to all things equally so the size of things remain the same relatively to each other (just being concise) whilst the speed that the cosmos vibrates and extends its depth of volume is increased as it will never cease to expand inwardly (its infinite and perpetual) only the speed changes.
So given this the particles will still remain the same harmonic integer size i.e. 1/3, 1/5, 1/6 in relation to each other regardless the f Dch of the cosmos...thus as the cosmos changes Dch the
particles all have quantum leaps in Dch equally so it can't be measured, but it still changes the f Dch of all particles.

If a particle is to loose mass its Dch rate will have to decrease in relation to the cosmos Dch rate. Now here is the really crazy part...all of what has been said is dependent on the
cosmos having a f Dch which varies in rate, but if its variable rate comes to a complete stand still as energy is discharged and acquired from the fractal layer above at a equal rate thus creating a stand still in the cosmos f Dch speed i.e. the quantum leaps cease but the f continues into infinity of space, it is out of resonance with matter/energy of particles within so expansion stops, but its rate is still going infinitely into the measureless depth of space (its infinite it cant literally stop) at a rate that exceeds the event horizon of the f Dch so it is absorbed without changing the relative depth of defined cosmic space.
Therefore the particles within will have their Dch brought to a stand still in relation aswell. But the ratio of difference which determines their individual frequency will show up as an exact value of which they are for them self without the quantum leaps of the cosmos f Dch.

Now if the f Dch of the cosmos begins to decrease to a rate slower than the medium f Dch prior to the stand still event i.e. when the cosmos was receiving and distributing to the fractal layer above in equal ratio, then the particles within will have to start decreasing as well. With this the inverse factor applies... i.e. decrease in depth charge maintains relative mass rather than increase.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2011, 07:46:41 PM by Ryan Onessence »
http://soundcloud.com/orin-zolis/sets/world-music-ethnic-beats/

Knowledge gained via academic means and intelligence are not mutually inclusive. Those who assume authority and superiority over conventionally uneducated persons would be wiser to keep this in mind.

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Roundy the Truthinessist

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2011, 03:23:15 PM »
The problem is getting them to accept a Flat Earth  If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate.

I always love a good Futurama reference.
Where did you educate the biology, in toulet?

Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2011, 01:44:43 PM »
I'm rather foiled but specified is chronicle.  Bailiwick at lowest can allow when it's deplorable."Never think you can transform over any old falsity without a terrible wriggly of the offensive small universe that dwells low it." -O.W. Holmes
"Trammels sharpeneth club; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his somebody.



« Last Edit: September 23, 2011, 02:35:47 PM by Ski »

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Ski

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2011, 02:36:42 PM »
I have decided to delete your link instead of you whole post b/c it entertained me, spambot.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

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Ryan Onessence

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Re: Where is the Higgs Boson?
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2011, 03:16:42 AM »
I thought some one was pullin ya leg for a while  ;D
http://soundcloud.com/orin-zolis/sets/world-music-ethnic-beats/

Knowledge gained via academic means and intelligence are not mutually inclusive. Those who assume authority and superiority over conventionally uneducated persons would be wiser to keep this in mind.