Stealing bandwidth

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Mrs. Peach

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #60 on: February 01, 2011, 04:02:18 PM »
I think it's under the rules of the FCC here.  You guys should write a letter to them and complain about your neighbor's wi-fi cluttering up your yard.  Let us know their reply.

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EnigmaZV

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #61 on: February 01, 2011, 04:17:06 PM »
You could build a fine mesh Faraday cage around your house
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage
That would keep your wifi from escaping.  It would also have the beneficial effect of keeping intruding EM waves from coming into your house.
I don't know what you're implying, but you're probably wrong.

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parsec

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #62 on: February 01, 2011, 06:11:49 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

This. Go on, sir. Preach some more.

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Lorddave

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #63 on: February 01, 2011, 06:18:46 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?
I am a terrible person and I am a typical Blowhard Liberal for being wrong about Bom.

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Tausami

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #64 on: February 01, 2011, 07:16:15 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

That would be like throwing a safe full of money over your fence; you can't use it, but neither can anybody else.

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parsec

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #65 on: February 01, 2011, 07:19:26 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

That would be like throwing a safe full of money over your fence; you can't use it, but neither can anybody else.

Except if you can break the code.

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Tausami

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #66 on: February 01, 2011, 07:22:53 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

That would be like throwing a safe full of money over your fence; you can't use it, but neither can anybody else.

Except if you can break the code.

The analogy holds. You can break a lock.

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EnglshGentleman

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #67 on: February 01, 2011, 07:28:29 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

After all, your own Wi-Fi could get interfered with because of theirs. I know this to be true because in the dorms, people have all sorts of wireless printers and shit, and I can see like 20 things to connect to. As a result, the interference bogs down my own internet.

So they either need to make their signal strength weaker, or deal with me printing black pages on their printer.

Even if it is encrypted, it is still going to ruin my own signal.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #68 on: February 01, 2011, 10:15:15 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

If it's encrypted or password protected then it's common courtesy not to try to circumvent that.

But if it's unprotected then the default position I must take is that they want their family, friends, and neighbors to be able to use it undisturbed.

The same goes for visual photons; if you don't want the whole world seeing your personal business in your room keep your shades closed. If you don't mind people seeing what goes on inside your room then keep them open. You can't tell me not to look at your house.

Once you start broadcasting sounds, light, images, or signals onto other people's property you can't demand that your neighbors shut their eyes or not access it. You don't have an expectation of privacy when you're trespassing your publicly accessible signals onto the property of others.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 10:34:44 PM by Tom Bishop »

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Parsifal

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #69 on: February 01, 2011, 10:27:05 PM »
I agree with Tom, actually. I was agreeing with Saddam until I saw Tom's argument. If you don't want random strangers using your Wi-Fi, either encrypt it or don't make it available to them.

Also, I feel I should address the fact that some people are using the term "password protected." That isn't really appropriate here, because simply "password protect[ing]" something doesn't necessarily make it any more difficult to access -- you also need a way of enforcing the use of that password, the most common of which is encryption.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 10:29:45 PM by Parsifal »
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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Raist

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Re: Stealing bandwidth
« Reply #70 on: February 03, 2011, 12:32:37 PM »
They don't need their bandwidth!

Does that make it okay for me to jump onto a half-empty subway without paying?  They don't need the extra space.

Your rights end when you start broadcasting onto my property.

If you blast your stereo all night and it is annoyingly audible from my property I should have the right to call the police.

If you blast free Wi-Fi and it is publically available from my property I should have the right to use it.

If you throw bags of money over the side of my fence I should have the right to keep it.

What if it's encrypted?

If it's encrypted or password protected then it's common courtesy not to try to circumvent that.

But if it's unprotected then the default position I must take is that they want their family, friends, and neighbors to be able to use it undisturbed.

The same goes for visual photons; if you don't want the whole world seeing your personal business in your room keep your shades closed. If you don't mind people seeing what goes on inside your room then keep them open. You can't tell me not to look at your house.

Once you start broadcasting sounds, light, images, or signals onto other people's property you can't demand that your neighbors shut their eyes or not access it. You don't have an expectation of privacy when you're trespassing your publicly accessible signals onto the property of others.

Probably the best stance offered so far.