Very Large Explosions

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Tristan

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  • Bendy Earth Proponent
Very Large Explosions
« on: November 23, 2010, 05:25:28 AM »
One interesting feature of VERY big explosions, (such as the TSAR Bomb, the eruption of krakatoa, the Tunguska event, etc) is that the sound waves it produces are powerful enough to circle the earth multiple times. This is because of the geometry of the earth - being a sphere, a sound wave sent off in any direction will eventually loop around and return to its point of origin, assuming it is powerful enough.

On a flat earth, the sound waves would travel out and out forever and never cycle back causing the sounds to fall off the edge of the earth. It's essentially the same problem as circumnavigation, but without being able to rely on magnetic compasses and/or Conspiracy-controlled GPS for explanation.

What could cause this?

To save you all the trouble, I have created a few alternate explanations for you. Just pick your favourite and let me know:

1) Bendy Sound.
2) Sound is magnetic and is drawn into circular paths by the magnetic pole.
3) Giant space mirrors that reflect sound.
4) Refuse to acknowledge phenomenon. Demand I generate multi-megaton explosion in order to record sound as evidence for the effect, and insist that until this is done, it constitutes a "win" for FE.
5) Sound is part of the conspiracy.

Thanks
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fluffycornsnake

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Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2010, 05:59:21 AM »
6) Sound bounces off the ice wall.

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Atom Man

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Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2010, 07:14:07 AM »
6) Sound bounces off the ice wall.

So you mean 5 then!
Urinal Etiquette is like Ghost Busting: Never Cross the Streams

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EnglshGentleman

  • Flat Earth Editor
  • 9548
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2010, 07:27:49 AM »
4) Refuse to acknowledge phenomenon. Demand I generate multi-megaton explosion in order to record sound as evidence for the effect, and insist that until this is done, it constitutes a "win" for FE.

I am going to go with this. I find it highly unlikely that this would occur. Even if the terrain was completely clear, it would take 37.1 hours for sound to travel all the way around a globe the size of the Earth. I would like to see a scientific record in which the people sat around and timed this. I further find this assertion to be unlikely, because the terrain is not completely clear. There are mountains and crap in the way. Lets even say that the sound does go around the entire world. Once it reaches the point of origin, the sound waves are just going to collide with each other and cancel each other out. I am very doubtful of your claim.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010, 10:45:11 AM by EnglshGentleman »

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Tristan

  • 180
  • Bendy Earth Proponent
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2010, 09:11:46 AM »
I find it highly unlikely that this would occur. Even if the terrain was completely clear, it would take 10.4 hours for sound to travel all the way around a globe the size of the Earth. I would like to see a scientific record in which the people sat around and timed this. I further find this assertion to be unlikely, because the terrain is not completely clear. There are mountains and crap in the way. Lets even say that the sound does go around the entire world. Once it reaches the point of origin, the sound waves are just going to collide with each other and cancel each other out. I am very doubtful of your claim.

Well, according to the Royal Society's report on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, atmospheric and seismic waves were detected for five days after the initial explosion. I know that doesn't equate directly to sound, but it follows the same principle.
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Tom Bishop

  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 17587
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2010, 09:23:37 AM »
I find it highly unlikely that this would occur. Even if the terrain was completely clear, it would take 10.4 hours for sound to travel all the way around a globe the size of the Earth. I would like to see a scientific record in which the people sat around and timed this. I further find this assertion to be unlikely, because the terrain is not completely clear. There are mountains and crap in the way. Lets even say that the sound does go around the entire world. Once it reaches the point of origin, the sound waves are just going to collide with each other and cancel each other out. I am very doubtful of your claim.

Well, according to the Royal Society's report on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, atmospheric and seismic waves were detected for five days after the initial explosion. I know that doesn't equate directly to sound, but it follows the same principle.

The eruption could have easily created geologic instability, resulting in periodic tectonic activity, much like how tremors can follow a large earthquake for several days or even weeks after the event.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010, 09:26:39 AM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2010, 10:26:19 AM »
4) Refuse to acknowledge phenomenon. Demand I generate multi-megaton explosion in order to record sound as evidence for the effect, and insist that until this is done, it constitutes a "win" for FE.

I am going to go with this. I find it highly unlikely that this would occur. Even if the terrain was completely clear, it would take 10.4 hours for sound to travel all the way around a globe the size of the Earth. I would like to see a scientific record in which the people sat around and timed this. I further find this assertion to be unlikely, because the terrain is not completely clear. There are mountains and crap in the way. Lets even say that the sound does go around the entire world. Once it reaches the point of origin, the sound waves are just going to collide with each other and cancel each other out. I am very doubtful of your claim.
Clearly false. You really need to study physics before you post about it.
Keep it serious, Thork. You can troll, but don't be so open. We have standards

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John Davis

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Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2010, 10:28:32 AM »
I find it highly unlikely that this would occur. Even if the terrain was completely clear, it would take 10.4 hours for sound to travel all the way around a globe the size of the Earth. I would like to see a scientific record in which the people sat around and timed this. I further find this assertion to be unlikely, because the terrain is not completely clear. There are mountains and crap in the way. Lets even say that the sound does go around the entire world. Once it reaches the point of origin, the sound waves are just going to collide with each other and cancel each other out. I am very doubtful of your claim.

Well, according to the Royal Society's report on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, atmospheric and seismic waves were detected for five days after the initial explosion. I know that doesn't equate directly to sound, but it follows the same principle.
The Royal Society has been shown to throw every explanation they can for various events on phenomena such as this, especially during the time period you cite.
Quantum Ab Hoc

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gotham

  • Planar Moderator
  • 3329
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2010, 02:34:43 PM »
I can only answer it partly, but with the support of logic I would say that at least sound traveling underwater would be (6).

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Thork

Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2010, 03:12:12 PM »
I can only answer it partly, but with the support of logic I would say that at least sound traveling underwater would be (6).
Speed of sound in air is 330 m/s
Speed of sound in water is 1500 m/s
Speed of sound through iron is 5000 m/s
Speed of sound in earth's core .... up to 17,000 m/s.

*Rough numbers. Speed of sound is dependant on density, temperature, pressure, viscosity etc.

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gotham

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Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2010, 03:33:29 PM »
I can only answer it partly, but with the support of logic I would say that at least sound traveling underwater would be (6).
Speed of sound in air is 330 m/s
Speed of sound in water is 1500 m/s
Speed of sound through iron is 5000 m/s
Speed of sound in earth's core .... up to 17,000 m/s.

*Rough numbers. Speed of sound is dependant on density, temperature, pressure, viscosity etc.

Thanks.  I figured sound traveled faster in the water than air but 4.5 times is more than I thought.

I was just reading where they use the recorded sounds of shrimp played through underwater speakers to lure coral reef fish back to their reef environment. The sound of shrimp must be able to travel for quite a distance!

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Thork

Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2010, 03:42:10 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

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gotham

  • Planar Moderator
  • 3329
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2010, 03:48:13 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

I live steps from the ocean.  Now that will get me into the shark infested water to run a few tests.  Reports to follow...

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berny_74

  • 1786
  • The IceWall! Beat that
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2010, 05:38:16 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.


Watch Battlestar Galactica then.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

I live steps from the ocean.  Now that will get me into the shark infested water to run a few tests.  Reports to follow...

Don't worry too much - I've swam with them before.  They are not that bad.

Berny
Doesn't like shrimp.
To be fair, sometimes what FE'ers say makes so little sense that it's hard to come up with a rebuttal.
Moonlight is good for you.

Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2010, 11:55:59 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

Yeah...bothered me too. But I guess we have to live with the concept of Scifi space. I mean, how do they turn so rapidly in space? O.o

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Tristan

  • 180
  • Bendy Earth Proponent
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2010, 02:45:15 AM »
Well, according to the Royal Society's report on the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, atmospheric and seismic waves were detected for five days after the initial explosion. I know that doesn't equate directly to sound, but it follows the same principle.
The Royal Society has been shown to throw every explanation they can for various events on phenomena such as this, especially during the time period you cite.

I'm not clear on this counter-argument. Atmospheric and seismic waves were detected for five days - that's not an explanation for anything. It wasn't even the Royal Society that made these observations, they just reported the information.
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Thork

Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2010, 02:14:24 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

I live steps from the ocean.  Now that will get me into the shark infested water to run a few tests.  Reports to follow...

Please check for this also.

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gotham

  • Planar Moderator
  • 3329
Re: Very Large Explosions
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2010, 02:30:06 PM »
Mildly off topic but the speed of sound in space is 0 m/s. No one can hear you scream. This is the thing that bothers me most about star wars. The explosions always make a big bang, but really there shouldn't be any noise.

Anyway, as for shrimp, whales or anything like that propagation of sound is more a function of frequency. Whale song travels miles and miles. But if shrimp have little high pitch voices, then their conversations aren't going to travel very far. It the average shrimp sounds like Barry White though, they'll be able to talk across an ocean.

I live steps from the ocean.  Now that will get me into the shark infested water to run a few tests.  Reports to follow...

Please check for this also.


Will do. I am on it.  We have not adequately explored the waters of our own earth!  
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 03:32:28 PM by gotham »