Tides follow the moon

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Tides follow the moon
« on: August 10, 2006, 05:41:23 AM »
Tides follow the moon, no some unexplained wobble.

?

joffenz

  • The Elder Ones
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Tides follow the moon
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2006, 05:46:04 AM »
The moon is made of cheese, not some kind of rock.

Tides follow the moon
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2006, 05:46:15 AM »
So that would be gravitational pull then?

Tides follow the moon
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2006, 05:48:10 AM »
Yes. A gravitational pull that orbits the Earth, and pulls on the oceans as if they sit over an oblate spheroid.

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James

  • Flat Earther
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Re: Tides follow the moon
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2006, 05:50:00 AM »
Quote from: "antipodean"
Tides follow the moon, no some unexplained wobble.


I can see why this is thought to be true. In actual fact, both the Moon and tides are subject to the same force, which is why they appear to be related. That force is the evaporative power of the Sun. When the Sun shines over a portion of ocean, locally negligible (but very large in total) amounts of water evaporate. The "gap" causes predictable sloshing as the water on the Moon side fills the gap. When the Sun "sets", the water condenses, causing a combination of rainfall and sloshing.
"For your own sake, as well as for that of our beloved country, be bold and firm against error and evil of every kind." - David Wardlaw Scott, Terra Firma 1901

Tides follow the moon
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2006, 05:52:12 AM »
Sorry, that doesn't work.

If the cause was heating by the Sun, tides would be related to sunrise/sunset. They're not.

Next explanation, please.

Tides follow the moon
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2006, 05:55:32 AM »
Quote
I can see why this is thought to be true. In actual fact, both the Moon and tides are subject to the same force, which is why they appear to be related. That force is the evaporative power of the Sun. When the Sun shines over a portion of ocean, locally negligible (but very large in total) amounts of water evaporate. The "gap" causes predictable sloshing as the water on the Moon side fills the gap. When the Sun "sets", the water condenses, causing a combination of rainfall and sloshing.


Do you read all of your theories in a book or do you make it up as you go along?