Question about the Atmosphere?

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Question about the Atmosphere?
« on: December 15, 2009, 02:43:05 PM »
I am a new fe'r and had just one question off the top of my head. How does the atmosphere stay on top of the earth? I mean I have flown in a plane before so it would require massive ice walls to contain it. Otherwise due to random molecular motion it would eventually spill out and be left behind as we hurdle through space. Thanks in advance.

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Mookie89

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2009, 02:51:26 PM »
I am a new fe'r and had just one question off the top of my head. How does the atmosphere stay on top of the earth? I mean I have flown in a plane before so it would require massive ice walls to contain it. Otherwise due to random molecular motion it would eventually spill out and be left behind as we hurdle through space. Thanks in advance.

There's no such thing as sphere's, so the atmo"sphere" does not exist, which means nothing is needed to hold nothing in.
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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2009, 03:00:04 PM »
So how do we breathe? To be honest, this flat earth stuff is seeming less and less likely the more I read. The corialis effect, neutrino's, flights, and gyro's all point toward rotation and a round earth but I still want to give flat earth a chance.

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Mookie89

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2009, 03:12:33 PM »
So how do we breathe? To be honest, this flat earth stuff is seeming less and less likely the more I read. The corialis effect, neutrino's, flights, and gyro's all point toward rotation and a round earth but I still want to give flat earth a chance.

Air does not exist. We cannot see it therefore it does not exist. Some of NASA's top agents have created micro-biotic air robots that make us think that we are breathing air, therefore we are not breathing air. We cannot see these robots, but since we are able to breathe, that is evidence that they exist.
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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2009, 03:45:42 PM »
So I guess the Flat Earth really is just all wild speculation. At least I still have bloodletting and astrology and flying spaghetti monsters to console me.



Honestly though, how does the flat earth theory explain breathing?

Disclaimer: I actually believe in round earth and wanted to get some results from flat earthers.

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ERTW

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2009, 03:55:24 PM »
So I guess the Flat Earth really is just all wild speculation. At least I still have bloodletting and astrology and flying spaghetti monsters to console me.



Honestly though, how does the flat earth theory explain breathing?

Disclaimer: I actually believe in round earth and wanted to get some results from flat earthers.
You talked about massive ice walls in your OP. I think this is the current answer, coupled with UA keeping the atmolayer down.
Don't diss physics until you try it!

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2009, 04:20:14 PM »
So I guess the Flat Earth really is just all wild speculation. At least I still have bloodletting and astrology and flying spaghetti monsters to console me.



Honestly though, how does the flat earth theory explain breathing?

Disclaimer: I actually believe in round earth and wanted to get some results from flat earthers.

I have only just begun research into FE myself. The neutrino and sinking ship problems lead me to posit a translucent flat plate above the Earth. Now, it doesn't seem like the ice walls are high enough to form a container, but their height may have been underestimated. Whatever the case with the  ice-walls, it seems fruitful to pursue an inquiry into this flat plate which may double as a lid for the air.

Disclaimer: My own personal feasibility study neither prejudices nor favours nor reflects any FE orthodoxy.

( ) or _ ?

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2009, 04:31:00 PM »
But isn't that just conjecture? I mean sure it is feasibly (extremely low chance) of it happening but from reading this site, it seems you can just make stuff up because "it fits/works." Isn't science about first disproving nulls then giving hypotheses on what could be affecting it? Also I do not believe that gps would work without satellites. Wouldn't almost any military, communications, or gps company realize there are no satellites. Also if you believe there are satellites, why can't we use pictures of the freaking earth. I just feel that while feasibly possible, that doesn't mean it is true. And as of now, there are lots of problems with flat earth theory due to common phenomena. If you can create a theory that addresses all of them while staying consistent with what we observe, then maybe fe will be = to re. But you can never be certain which one is true (according to you).

Also, The ice walls would have to be about pretty high up to keep the atmosphere in. We would be able to see it. Also, Ice doesn't like the really low pressures of the end of the atmosphere (it boils). And a glass dome that magically fits over earth? I guess its plausible though highly unlikely. Surely even the staunchest Flat earther believes that round earth can be true.

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2009, 04:41:32 PM »
Also, The ice walls would have to be about pretty high up to keep the atmosphere in. We would be able to see it.

There is no atmosphere in FET.
( ) or _ ?

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Jack

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2009, 04:48:00 PM »
I am a new fe'r and had just one question off the top of my head. How does the atmosphere stay on top of the earth? I mean I have flown in a plane before so it would require massive ice walls to contain it. Otherwise due to random molecular motion it would eventually spill out and be left behind as we hurdle through space. Thanks in advance.
The consensus is that a greater ice wall holds the atmolayer in.

So how do we breathe? To be honest, this flat earth stuff is seeming less and less likely the more I read. The corialis effect, neutrino's, flights, and gyro's all point toward rotation and a round earth but I still want to give flat earth a chance.

Air does not exist. We cannot see it therefore it does not exist. Some of NASA's top agents have created micro-biotic air robots that make us think that we are breathing air, therefore we are not breathing air. We cannot see these robots, but since we are able to breathe, that is evidence that they exist.
Keep this out of the upper forums.

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2009, 05:41:20 PM »
So where is the oxygen we breath? I have flown in a plane and breath so obviously there is gas up at 30,000 feet. So the ice wall would have to be that tall to hold it in. I don't see how you are going to get around that without proving there is a giant magical wall around the disc. Not that that is wrong or makes your theory wrong, i'm just saying short of inventing a completely undiscovered thing, your theory is unfeasible. As a true scientist, if your theory is coherent and plausible there is indeed a chance of it being true. But right now I do not see the parity between Round and Flat earth theories.

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2009, 05:44:09 PM »
short of inventing a completely undiscovered thing, your theory is unfeasible.

Like THAT'S ever happened before...

Oh, except the anti-moon. And the space mirror. And the gears under the earth. And the UA.

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Mookie89

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2009, 05:46:40 PM »
short of inventing a completely undiscovered thing, your theory is unfeasible.

Like THAT'S ever happened before...

Oh, except the anti-moon. And the space mirror. And the gears under the earth. And the UA.

And the sub-moon. You can't forget that one.
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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2009, 05:52:07 PM »
Is that different from the anti-moon? Or am I mixing it up and it's actually the anti-sun? Hard to keep track of all the crazy opposing FE theories sometimes.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2009, 05:58:51 PM »
Actually this is far more likely than 80,000 feet high Ice Walls:

http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Atmolayer+Lip+Hypothesis

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2009, 06:03:07 PM »
Actually this is far more likely than 80,000 feet high Ice Walls:

http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Atmolayer+Lip+Hypothesis

That actually brings up a very good point against FET. Say there is a very, very cold area off Antarctica. The way wind currents work is a buildup of heat in one area is distributed to colder areas. Heat doesn't like to stay bunched up in one space-it dissipates. If there was a cold area outside of the observable Earth, and it was infinite, there would be a constant flow of air from the warm equator out over the ice wall into nothingness.

Of course, soon we'd run out of air. This doesn't seem to be the case.

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Optimus Prime

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2009, 06:04:04 PM »
So where is the oxygen we breath? I have flown in a plane and breath so obviously there is gas up at 30,000 feet. So the ice wall would have to be that tall to hold it in. I don't see how you are going to get around that without proving there is a giant magical wall around the disc. Not that that is wrong or makes your theory wrong, i'm just saying short of inventing a completely undiscovered thing, your theory is unfeasible. As a true scientist, if your theory is coherent and plausible there is indeed a chance of it being true. But right now I do not see the parity between Round and Flat earth theories.

Actually I'd have to call that one... most planes I am aware of that have the ability to fly at those altitudes have pressurized cabins which basically can be interpreted as having created a contained environment for the flight while at altitude. So really I would not use that as part of your argument.

Also, using your line of thinking, then there would be no problem with an atmolayer extending well beyond the wall's height since it would work just like a cup filled with a thick, viscous gas inside of a magnetic field. Haven't you ever filled a glass right to the brim with water and seen it hold a good amount OVER the top from surface tension? Seen those experiments in science class where the beaker moves up, and a large mushroom of gas stays above it? So following the same logic - you are kind of killing your own thought process on this point really.

Just thought I'd point that out. I like your style though. Nice to see someone actually asking questions as opposed to waltzing in and being an ass. LOL

Take care,
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Mookie89

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2009, 06:12:52 PM »
Actually this is far more likely than 80,000 feet high Ice Walls:

http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Atmolayer+Lip+Hypothesis

Wow, you haven't been very talkative today.
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Ugh ugh! Ugh nug nug ugh!

It's fourteen French social dances past the hour.

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2009, 06:58:46 PM »
But airplane cabins are not perfectly pressurized. Also what about sky diving? That means there is gas up to a relatively high point. What is to stop random molecular motion from eventually scattering the gas. I know the disc is infinitely long but if there is only a couple atoms of oxygen on average it would be hard to breathe.

But thank you for the theory, it does make a good bit of sense and while I do not believe it, it is technically feasible baring the points I have made above.

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Skeleton

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2009, 07:44:06 PM »
I am a new fe'r and had just one question off the top of my head. How does the atmosphere stay on top of the earth? I mean I have flown in a plane before so it would require massive ice walls to contain it. Otherwise due to random molecular motion it would eventually spill out and be left behind as we hurdle through space. Thanks in advance.

Glue.
If the ultimate objective is to kill Skeleton, we should just do that next.

Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2009, 05:56:18 AM »
Actually this is far more likely than 80,000 feet high Ice Walls:

http://www.theflatearthsociety.org/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Atmolayer+Lip+Hypothesis

Both of which being less likely than a spherical Earth.

You should really consider correcting the glaring inaccuracies in your link as well as understanding the inherent incorrect assumption you are making when making such statements.

    The Flat Earth does not necessary need to be physically infinite in order to contain the atmosphere. Just very big. Often we might hear "infinite earth" from Flat Earth proponents as an analogy for what exists beyond the 150 foot wall of ice at the Antarctic coast; a stretch of land incomprehensible by human standards.

    In order for barometric pressure to rise and fall, an element of heat must be present. Heat creates pressure. A lack of heat results in a drop in pressure. These two elements are tightly correlated in modern physics.

    In our local area the heat of the day comes from the sun, moving and swashing around wind currents from areas of low pressures to areas of high pressures with its heat. The coldness of the Antarctic tundra keeps the pressure low. Beyond the known world, where the rays of the sun do not reach, the tundra of ice and snow lays in perpetual darkness. If one could move away from the Antarctic rim into the uncharted tundra the surrounding temperatures would drop lower and lower until it nears absolute zero. Defining the exact length of the gradient would take some looking into, but at a significant distance past the edge of the Ice Wall temperatures will drop to a point where barometric pressure nears the zero mark. At this point, whether it be thousands or millions of miles beyond the Antarctic rim, the world can physically end without the atmosphere leaking into space.

    The atmosphere may very well exist as a lip upon the surface of the earth, held in by vast gradients of declining pressure
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SupahLovah

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2009, 08:21:38 AM »
I think the FAQs say something about an invisible DE field kind of thing.

Similar to the invisible boundaries between mixing fluids.
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markjo

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2009, 09:00:01 AM »
I think the FAQs say something about an invisible DE field kind of thing.

Similar to the invisible boundaries between mixing fluids.

Except that energy doesn't act like a fluid.  :-X
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SupahLovah

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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #23 on: December 16, 2009, 09:00:52 AM »
IDK, don't ask me.
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Re: Question about the Atmosphere?
« Reply #24 on: December 16, 2009, 04:54:44 PM »
All I am asking is for any theory (made up I don't care) that explains the atmosphere problem and is consistent with observations and basic physics that you hold true in fet.