Lensing

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Lensing
« on: July 08, 2006, 05:51:17 PM »
How come the sun (spotlight :lol:) looks so big in the morning and so big in the evening, compared to how it looks during the majority of the day?

As I understand, when we view the sun in the morning, we are viewing it through atmospheric conditions and a distorted atmosphere, i.e. a lense.  At midday, when the sun is overhead, the lensing effect is decreased.  When the sun sets, it suddenly appears bigger. How does this happen in the Flat Earth theory?

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Erasmus

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Lensing
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2006, 06:20:20 PM »
It turns out that this is all in your head.  The sun's and moon's apparent sizes do not change when they are near the horizon.

Atmospheric effects can make the sun appear squashed when near the horizon, but they cannot make the sun appear bigger.
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

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RenaissanceMan

Lensing
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2006, 06:43:58 PM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
It turns out that this is all in your head.  The sun's and moon's apparent sizes do not change when they are near the horizon.

Atmospheric effects can make the sun appear squashed when near the horizon, but they cannot make the sun appear bigger.


Really? Under the Flat Earth Hypothesis, ignoring any illusion at sunrise / sunset they SHOULD change in apparent size as the move over the earth because of the distance from the observer. Something much farther away SHOULD appear smaller.

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Erasmus

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Lensing
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2006, 07:03:37 PM »
Quote from: "RenaissanceMan"
Really?


"Really?" to which part?
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

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RenaissanceMan

Lensing
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2006, 07:19:29 PM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
Quote from: "RenaissanceMan"
Really?


"Really?" to which part?


What part about things further away looking smaller don't you comprehend?

Lensing
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2006, 07:37:13 PM »
This is an optical illusion.  The moon also appears much larger when closer to the horizon.  Here is how it works.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/20jun_moonillusion.htm

It is the same size on your retina, but the mind perceives it differently.  The farther something is above the horizon, the closer your brain perceives it as being to you.  The reverse is true of objects below the horizon.   (Think birds and cars) Because your brain perceives it as being closer to you, but it is the same size on your retina, your mind “assumes,” if you will, that it must be smaller.



I'm a RE by the way. 8-)