On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth

  • 11 Replies
  • 2051 Views
*

Jack Swallows

  • 19
  • Move b*tch get out the way
As I posted in a thread created by me wich was moved to another section which nobody seems to read.  ???
 
First. I need FEr not to be so reluctant about gravity. (I am going to adress the issue of the mistakenly called gravity varying from one point in the earth to another)

This could even be called the FE-gravity unification theory ;).

Lets start by assuming the earth is a flat disc but its deepness is variable. Earth is mostly accelerated by dark energy at roughly 9.8 m/s. But earth and its deepness also provides a very slight gravitational pull which explains the differences in measurements of gravity. With this in mind, one could even conjecture how the bottom of the earth looks like.

I think this would turn into a nice debate for general disscusion and I ask (beg) not to move this topic.

Any FEr would care to explain if I am mistaken in my assumption?
YVAN EHT NIOJ

*

Sexual Harassment Panda

  • 7082
  • Now more sophisticated
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2009, 01:54:19 AM »
I couldn't completely understand your post, but I assume you are saying that the bottom of the earth has various shapes which then translates into different speed of acceleration based on your altitude on the top of the earth. Is my assumption correct?
|^^^^^^^^^^^\||_____          
|     STFU          |||""'|"""\___            O
| ______________|||___|__|__|)          -|- 
  (@)@)""""""**|(@)(@)**|(@)          / \

New Flat Earth FAQ: http://theflatearthsociety.org/forum/index.php?topic=30512.0

Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2009, 02:31:48 AM »
Yeah the acceleration at any point on the earth (which differs as we know) is directly proportional to the mass of material under your feet.


?

zork

  • 3319
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2009, 02:51:54 AM »
 It raises the question, how the thickness of material can affect the acceleration. If you accelerate disc which is in one point 1mm thick and in other point 1km thick do you assume that the place which is 1mm thick accelerates more or less than place with 1km thickness.
Rowbotham had bad eyesight
-
http://thulescientific.com/Lynch%20Curvature%202008.pdf - Visually discerning the curvature of the Earth
http://thulescientific.com/TurbulentShipWakes_Lynch_AO_2005.pdf - Turbulent ship wakes:further evidence that the Earth is round.

Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2009, 02:56:05 AM »
No.

Then it wouldn't be a disc, would it?

The point the OP seems to be getting at, is that FE relies on this upwards acceleration, whereas measuring gravity at various points across the earth proves this to be wrong. So now, after rubbishing gravity as RE'ers refer to it, now FE theory maybe has a bit of gravity, to supplement UA, so that it actually works.

*

Lord Wilmore

  • Vice President
  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 12107
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 07:40:39 AM »
I think this would turn into a nice debate for general disscusion and I ask (beg) not to move this topic.

As noble as this sentiment is, we are trying to give the boards a bit more direction and purpose of late, and as this is a more serious question, I'm going to move this to Q&C.
"I want truth for truth's sake, not for the applaud or approval of men. I would not reject truth because it is unpopular, nor accept error because it is popular. I should rather be right and stand alone than run with the multitude and be wrong." - C.S. DeFord

*

Jack Swallows

  • 19
  • Move b*tch get out the way
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2009, 07:55:39 AM »
No.

Then it wouldn't be a disc, would it?

The point the OP seems to be getting at, is that FE relies on this upwards acceleration, whereas measuring gravity at various points across the earth proves this to be wrong. So now, after rubbishing gravity as RE'ers refer to it, now FE theory maybe has a bit of gravity, to supplement UA, so that it actually works.

That was were I was trying to get. Just a bit of gravity.  :P
YVAN EHT NIOJ

Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2009, 05:03:46 PM »
Frankly, I don't see why the FET cannot accept gravity to be solely responsible for us being pulled towards the earth.
I can't see how it would make their argument any weaker, and perhaps even stronger getting rid of the hopelessly flawed UA.
You can still have a flat earth (albeit a thick one) with scientificaly backed gravity.

You might even be able to come up with something ridiculous out of gravity that explains bendy light. Say... gravity repels photons somehow and thats why light bends away from the earth?
Hell, so far I think thats the best explanation of bendy light on the forum... and I don't even support FET.

*

markjo

  • Content Nazi
  • The Elder Ones
  • 42528
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2009, 06:12:57 PM »
The way I see it, there are several reasons that FE can't accept gravity.  Not the least of which being that gravity acts towards the center of mass of an object.  No biggie for those in the northern hemiplane.  However, as you go further south, you might notice a bit of a list to one side.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

*

Lord Wilmore

  • Vice President
  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 12107
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2009, 06:17:30 PM »
The way I see it, there are several reasons that FE can't accept gravity.  Not the least of which being that gravity acts towards the center of mass of an object.  No biggie for those in the northern hemiplane.  However, as you go further south, you might notice a bit of a list to one side.
As Markjo says, if the earth is a finite disc, then there are several reasons why 'gravity' and FET are incompatible. Of course, in John Davis' Infinite Plane model, gravitation is part of FET.
"I want truth for truth's sake, not for the applaud or approval of men. I would not reject truth because it is unpopular, nor accept error because it is popular. I should rather be right and stand alone than run with the multitude and be wrong." - C.S. DeFord

Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2009, 05:31:31 AM »
Gravity does not always pull towards the centre.
It pulls towards mass, most of which happens to be concentrated at the centre of the earth in RET.

On a flat earth the concentration of mass would be even throughout and so it would pull directly downwards, not to the centre of the disk.
You can factor in differences in the strength of gravity from other things previously mentioned.

*

Lord Wilmore

  • Vice President
  • Flat Earth Believer
  • 12107
Re: On differences about acceleration in different points in the earth
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 05:38:24 AM »
Gravity does not always pull towards the centre.
It pulls towards mass, most of which happens to be concentrated at the centre of the earth in RET.

On a flat earth the concentration of mass would be even throughout and so it would pull directly downwards, not to the centre of the disk.
You can factor in differences in the strength of gravity from other things previously mentioned.



I'm not sure who this is directed at, but if it was directed at what I said, this is the basis of the infinite plane model:


This is the main heart of the infinite plane model.  It has to do with the unobserved myth of decreasing gravitational pull with altitude.

Given an infinite flat earth:

Infinite Flat Earth Depth and Gravitational Pull

Using Gauss's law:


Alternately, you can integrate:
Apply

to an infinite slab of density , obtaining

where A is the area of the "pillbox," G is the gravitational constant, and h is the thickness of the slab. Therefore, the gravitational acceleration is given by

Source:Wolfram.com

 a < 2*pi*G*D.

Ignore thickness on that first little sketch.  I was in a hurry when I did that I think.

"I want truth for truth's sake, not for the applaud or approval of men. I would not reject truth because it is unpopular, nor accept error because it is popular. I should rather be right and stand alone than run with the multitude and be wrong." - C.S. DeFord