new age

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prometheuspyrotechie

new age
« on: March 11, 2009, 04:37:59 PM »
so i was thinking today, time is a universally accepted idea, not a definite one. i decided to pursue an entirely new way of seeing time. instead of portraying time as a contiuum or some linear function, i thought that since we operate within periods of time associated with age or maturity, i would develop some measurement of these periods and use them in place of the idea of the "year". the first say, 12 years of one's life are very monotonous and dont vary much. ideals and beliefs revolve around the same principals as one's peers and adult units. due to this period's unimaginative and trite, operation, i'll keep it grouped together. this 12 year span i'll refer to as the 1-D period.

from 12 on though, things begin to get more interesting. by age 15, one is neck deep in puberty and can even be legally placed behind the wheel of a car. this age is the first step into independence. by shifting from dependence to co-dependence, we achieve greater freedoms. at age 18, you're considered grown, groomed for society, and responsible. by this age, most are out on their own. however, they are still tied financially to those who raised them. total independence is near. 21: the year you're finally truly free, no more legalities hinder your actions, and hopefully by this time youre really out on your own.

these significant ages occur at 3 "year" intervals, each interval building up to the climax age. i propose these three year periods ( starting from 12) be called dynamos. 12-15 first dynamo, 15-18 second dynamo, 18-21 third dynamo, and so on. how far do the dynamos reach in age? i should say up to thirty. at 24 one has graduated college and begins delving into the intricacies of their career. between 24-27 i would think is when someone would acquire a lifemate. 30 is the year you are no longer a "young man". at this point, you've reached the age of respectful and conformed behavior.
any period after should be measured in 5 "year" periods, notable occurrences are no longer predictable, but every 5 "years" that passes tend to have a psychological effect on adults. these 5 "year" periods i'll call planes. 1st plane, 2nd plane, you get the idea. after eighty, measurement returns to the standard "year" because croaking could be just around the bend. if one is to reach 100 they are in the realm i shall refer to as the "wennar's syrcul".

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Mykael

  • 4249
  • Professor of the Horrible Sciences
Re: new age
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2009, 04:54:16 PM »
Alright.

First of all, shouldn't this be in Religion and Philosophy?

Second, I'm not sure how this relates to time as a physics concept. What you're describing is more like stages of life, which vary wildly from person to person. In fact, a human's stages of life is an entirely different concept than time itself, time is just used to measure it.

so i was thinking today, time is a universally accepted idea, not a definite one. i decided to pursue an entirely new way of seeing time. instead of portraying time as a contiuum or some linear function, i thought that since we operate within periods of time associated with age or maturity, i would develop some measurement of these periods and use them in place of the idea of the "year". the first say, 12 years of one's life are very monotonous and dont vary much. ideals and beliefs revolve around the same principals as one's peers and adult units. due to this period's unimaginative and trite, operation, i'll keep it grouped together. this 12 year span i'll refer to as the 1-D period.
I don't know about you, but I had a very engaging childhood. It certainly was not "boring and monotonous". Be careful when you make broad generalizations.

Quote
1st plane, 2nd plane, you get the idea. after eighty, measurement returns to the standard "year" because croaking could be just around the bend. if one is to reach 100 they are in the realm i shall refer to as the "wennar's syrcul".
Where did you get the terms "plane" and "Wennar's Syrcul"? Did you just make them up?

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prometheuspyrotechie

Re: new age
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2009, 05:03:02 PM »
from a strictly human perspective, time is only relevant to how we progress or plan. ultimately this progression results in what we refer to as age. growth and development are products of the aging process.

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Pongo

  • Planar Moderator
  • 6753
Re: new age
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2009, 07:19:28 PM »
I'm not sure you can call this a new way to think about time when you are using the old (or traditional) method of time (years) to track your stages.  Also, this is still very linear (you said it wouldn't be linear).  This seems more like a study of human development than a new way to see time.  I could even entertain the idea that this may have been how cave-dwelling humans perceived time.  In other words, this would be a step backwards in human development to view time in such a way.

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Chris Spaghetti

  • Flat Earth Editor
  • 12682
Re: new age
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2009, 11:54:14 AM »
I don't think this works, many childhoods are very turbulent and may be the most 'exciting' time of the person's life.I think this method is unnecessarily clumsy and inaccurate.

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prometheuspyrotechie

Re: new age
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2009, 01:44:24 PM »
honestly i find it amusing that people are spending time reading my nonsense. in posting this passage, i was mainly curious to see what kinds of comments it would arouse. in no way did i expect anyone to take my "method" seriously.

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Pongo

  • Planar Moderator
  • 6753
Re: new age
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2009, 02:23:22 PM »
All right, good convo.  /thread