How high is the Sun?

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How high is the Sun?
« on: November 24, 2008, 01:58:58 AM »
Since there appears to be some disagreement between FE models about this question, I decided that it needs a thread so it can be discussed properly.

We have the Rowbothamian model which has the Sun 3000 miles above the surface of the Earth.

We also have the Sandokanian model which has the Sun 25 km above the surface of the Earth.

I was wondering what evidence there was for either distance.

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markjo

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Re: How high is the Sun?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2008, 05:26:22 AM »
Since there appears to be some disagreement between FE models about this question, I decided that it needs a thread so it can be discussed properly.

We have the Rowbothamian model which has the Sun 3000 miles above the surface of the Earth.

We also have the Sandokanian model which has the Sun 25 km above the surface of the Earth.

I was wondering what evidence there was for either distance.

Actually, Rowbotham concluded that the sun was somewhat less than 700 miles above the earth.  Tom posted a method to triangulate the altitude of the sun to be 3000 miles.  However, when I pointed out that the altitude of the sun appears to vary depending on the latitude where the observations made.  Tom generally responds by either asking me where I made my observations (I didn't, it was more of a thought experiment just like his) or he would claim that the altitude of the sun does indeed vary depending on the season (completely ignoring the latitude issue).
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trig

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Re: How high is the Sun?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2008, 08:46:19 AM »
The answer is that, including the "bendy light" idea, and naively accepting the lack of any kind of model to even define what bendy light does, any altitude can be argued.

If you want to embrace "bendy light" you can choose the height you prefer, but you have to accept that light has to magically bend both on the vertical plane that includes the observer and the Sun, and also on a horizontal plane, making the sunset and sunrise azimuths work, and bend light on the weirdest S shape to make everyone see the Southern constellations where they are actually seen. To make things worse, the whole bendy light scheme has to work using an unknown force of nature, since refraction would distort all celestial bodies, and electromagnetic effects would bend light through refraction. And the three other forces cannot bend light up to 90 degrees without telltale measurable effects.

If you want to reject "bendy light" you have no answer at all to the known fact that the stars are seen one degree further South for every 60 nautical miles you travel North. You can calculate the height of the Sun from one place, but your measurements will be inconsistent with the ones done further North or South.