Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #60 on: November 22, 2008, 12:36:49 AM »
I await you math then so I can see why distances of 1+ meters are short distances in quantum effects.  I have a feeling that this is going to be a pointless wait, because like other parts of EA that we have been waiting months for, this explanation will never come out.

Distances of 1+ metres are not short in terms of quantum effects. Please read my posts more thoroughly.



Now here is a diagram that shows how mirrors work on a RE.  Now if we use the FE theory of "bendy light" with this, it wouldn't look the same.  You couldn't reflect the light straight down to the ground.

This contradicts your earlier statement that horizontal light reflecting off a mirror inclined at 45 degrees would reflect towards the ground at 45 degrees. If you don't understand how it does, try mentally rotating that image by 45 degrees counterclockwise (or just turn your head 45 degrees clockwise if that's too difficult for you).

Why not?

Because not every interferometer rotates about an axis not aligned with the direction in which Dark Energy acts.

You haven't explained why interferometers wouldn't detect "bendy light" yet.  So far, I would say that none of them has detected "bendy light" yet, and if it was present, it would be noticeable.

They would, if designed to do so. However, there has never to my knowledge been one that has that ability.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #61 on: November 22, 2008, 01:20:39 AM »
Because not every interferometer rotates about an axis not aligned with the direction in which Dark Energy acts.

Interferometers mounted where the arms are vertical, which should detect "bendy light" if it was present, don't show any evidence.
 

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They would, if designed to do so. However, there has never to my knowledge been one that has that ability.

It isn't difficult to build this, and I have seen ones that do.  Instead of rotating about a point horizontally, they rotate vertically.  According to your theory, as the angle of the unit changes compared to EA, the effect would become more or less pronounced.  This effect is not observed.

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Earthquakesdontbend

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #62 on: November 22, 2008, 02:28:32 AM »
Can someone answer my question.

In case there is no gravity, there would be nothing holding the moon, the sun and the other spherical objects together. As less dense material would rise from the core of these objects, it would continue to do so, much like gas in a baloon. The moon would doubtlessly expand, and the sun would explode (since there is no gravity to contain the preassure created by the fusion reaction in the core).
I was thinking of putting up the "top ten shapes of the earth". I've got Pyramid Earth and Cubic Earth so far...

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #63 on: November 22, 2008, 03:07:03 AM »
Interferometers mounted where the arms are vertical, which should detect "bendy light" if it was present, don't show any evidence.

Why should they detect it?

It isn't difficult to build this, and I have seen ones that do.  Instead of rotating about a point horizontally, they rotate vertically.  According to your theory, as the angle of the unit changes compared to EA, the effect would become more or less pronounced.  This effect is not observed.

Are there any on a large scale which rotate vertically? If so, please provide a source.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #64 on: November 22, 2008, 04:29:37 AM »
Why should they detect it?

Why shouldn't they?  If light (and other electromagnetic waves) are always deflected away from the surface of the Earth, that should be detectable.

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Are there any on a large scale which rotate vertically? If so, please provide a source.

You haven't sufficiently explained why it has to be on a scale of tens of meters to be effective.

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #65 on: November 22, 2008, 04:32:18 AM »
Why shouldn't they?  If light (and other electromagnetic waves) are always deflected away from the surface of the Earth, that should be detectable.

Unless they are rotating, it would not be detectable.

You haven't sufficiently explained why it has to be on a scale of tens of meters to be effective.

I have, you just haven't listened.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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The Terror

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #66 on: November 22, 2008, 04:47:14 AM »
How does the bendy light thing tie into the strange FE phenomenon where the moon appears to stay a consistent size to observers despite moving thousands of miles during the course of a day, in defiance of perspective?

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #67 on: November 22, 2008, 05:04:34 AM »
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So because FE has one unknown force that RE doesn't, it automatically has more unknowns?

If you want to consider the entirety of both models, FE has plenty more unknowns. If you want to consider the models of how light behaves, as we are discussing here, then the FE model has one more unknown than the RE model.

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #68 on: November 22, 2008, 05:49:52 AM »
So we've now got it down to a metre. Still, we've a long way to go, as you know quantum mechanics works on pm scale. We'll get there eventually little troll.

Actually, the uncertainty in the position of the photon is probably on the order of nanometres in most situations.

Interferometers, like so much else, rely on the rectilinear propagation of light. Any variation in the path of light in one arm compared to the other would result in variation in the output.

Or, more likely, if light was being "bent" then the light paths just wouldn't realign. Oopsie.

There is no variation in the path of light. It bends, but the bending doesn't change over time.

How does the bendy light thing tie into the strange FE phenomenon where the moon appears to stay a consistent size to observers despite moving thousands of miles during the course of a day, in defiance of perspective?

Bendy light and the perspective effect perfectly cancel each other out.

If you want to consider the entirety of both models, FE has plenty more unknowns.

Are you willing to back up this statement by listing every unknown in each theory?
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #69 on: November 22, 2008, 06:02:31 AM »
OK, good we've got the quantum mechanical uncertainties down to nm.

Wow, we've come far haven't we?

Not really. I never claimed anything else to begin with.

Uh huh. Sorry maybe you misheard me. If light was being "bent" then the light paths just wouldn't realign.

Why not?
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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The Terror

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #70 on: November 22, 2008, 09:34:13 AM »
How does the bendy light thing tie into the strange FE phenomenon where the moon appears to stay a consistent size to observers despite moving thousands of miles during the course of a day, in defiance of perspective?
Bendy light and the perspective effect perfectly cancel each other out.

The perspective effect thingy out of that book about the Earth not being round?

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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #71 on: November 23, 2008, 01:05:03 AM »
Are you familiar with the concept of a coordinate system?
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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2008, 07:48:34 AM »
Are you familiar with the concept of a coordinate system?

Rather than trying to take us on a merry dance down some other avenue for another 5 pages, I'd just tally this one up as a failure if I was you.

The phenomenon of "bendy light" does not exist and therefore cannot be used to explain the appearance of the moon, nor the fact that a full moon is observable.

Is that a "no"?
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Parsifal

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Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #74 on: November 23, 2008, 08:44:02 AM »
I have described my position on the subject thoroughly more than once. Goldstein just doesn't seem to get it.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #75 on: November 23, 2008, 09:29:30 AM »
A small query:

As the light from the Sun that lights the full Moon is emitted almost perpendicular from the Earth's surface in a FE model, you would imagine that the lowest point of the parabola has to pass very close to the surface of the planet. Now, the mechanism for causing a lunar eclipse is normally cited in a FE model is a 'Shadow object', yet no large object has been sighted floating close to the ground above the North pole. Perhaps then the shadow object is the surface of the planet itself, when the Moon moves out of reach of the Sun's light? But this cannot be correct, as the shadow one would expect in such a situation would be a concave one, when a convex shadow is observed. Also, one would expect more Lunar eclipses during summer in the Southern hemisphere, as the Moon would then be a lot further from the Sun.

Also worthy of note is Solar eclipses. If the light from the sun that lights the Earth is almost all emitted perpendicular to the surface of the Earth, then when the Moon moves in front of the Sun, it should block almost all of the light from it, placing most of the planet in darkness, as the Moon is very close to and the same size as the Sun.

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BloodandSouls

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #76 on: November 23, 2008, 10:12:10 AM »
I have Failed to describe my position on the subject thoroughly more than once. I just don't seem to get it.


edited for more accuracy

Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #77 on: November 25, 2008, 02:00:03 AM »
I have described my position on the subject thoroughly more than once. Goldstein just doesn't seem to get it.

I don't get it either.

Can you please explain why it wouldn't work this way...


Re: Why does the moon "bend away" in case it is a disk/cylinder?
« Reply #78 on: November 26, 2008, 01:43:15 AM »
What, no comments on the lovely artwork?   :'(  :'(

I am still waiting for an explanation OBLRoboSteve