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BWilliams

Question
« on: October 28, 2008, 08:58:56 PM »
I have a question about the ships over the horizon thing.  Now i know the answer usually given has something to do with atmospheric light or something making it look like its sinking.  But how come if you are higher up, you can see more of the horizon?  Like from sea level, u see a ship go over the horizon after a certain distance, but if you were higher up, you can see the ship for longer.  It doesnt make sense casue you would think the bendy light or whatever would interfer, especially when you are higher up becasue you are even farther away from the ship then when on the ground.

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markjo

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Re: Question
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2008, 09:34:57 PM »
Search for "bendy light".  All your questions will be... umm.. answered there.
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dim

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Re: Question
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2008, 04:41:04 PM »
But you've answered yourself your own question. The higher you be the futher will be the ship, therefore visible same as for the same distance when staying on earth, or mountain.

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BWilliams

Re: Question
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2008, 07:16:40 PM »
I realize that...but I want to hear the the people who believe in flat earth have to say

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Question
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2008, 11:30:42 PM »
When you increase your altitude you are changing your perspective lines in relation to the earth, pushing back your vanishing point. The vanishing point, beyond which no man can see, is created when his perspective lines approach each other at a certain angle smaller than the eye can see. If you increase your height you are changing your perspective lines and thus can see further before all sight is lost to the vanishing point.

Usually it is taught in art schools that the vanishing point is an infinite distance away from the observer, as so:



However, since man cannot perceive infinity due to human limitations, the perspective lines are modified and placed a finite distance away from the observer as so:



The vanishing point acts as the liming point of all vision, as all bodies beyond it are too small and squished to see with the naked eye.

The same effect is found on a 3D video game which assumes a flat surface. When you increase your altitude you can see farther because you are so much higher than everything else. Your computer's resolution is better able to see something below you than off on the horizon where the pixels are linearly squished.

As you increase your altitude you are broadening your perspective lines in relation to the earth, causing a greater length the earth must recede until it ascends to eye level with the observer. The horizon is always at eye level with the observer, from the coast of a beach to the summit of Mt. Everest. Perspective causes everything to merge into the eye level horizon. When you increase your altitude you are changing the altitude of your eye, looking at the lands beyond your previous vanishing point. It takes a greater length of land for the earth to ascend to your new eye level. The land below you is removed from the Vanishing Point and less linearly squished at than it was before, since you are looking it it from a new angle where it is not compressed in the Vanishing Point.


« Last Edit: October 29, 2008, 11:36:20 PM by Tom Bishop »

Re: Question
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2008, 02:18:43 AM »

The same effect is found on a 3D video game which assumes a flat surface. When you increase your altitude you can see farther because you are so much higher than everything else. Your computer's resolution is better able to see something below you than off on the horizon where the pixels are linearly squished.



Brilliant.

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MadDogX

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Re: Question
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2008, 02:37:09 AM »
Uh oh. Tom is going into copy & paste mode again. ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7])

As has been discussed before, the "vanishing point due to human limitation" is total bollocks, because when looking through binoculars or a telescope, ships can still be seen to sink below the horizon.
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Moon squirter

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Re: Question
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2008, 02:48:57 AM »


However, since man cannot perceive infinity due to human limitations, the perspective lines are modified and placed a finite distance away from the observer as so:



The vanishing point acts as the liming point of all vision, as all bodies beyond it are too small and squished to see with the naked eye.

Tom, that is just so wrong:  You (and Wrongbothem) are confusing "vanishing points" with limits of resolution.  An observer's perceived vanishing point does not change, no matter how bad his eyesight is;  In a geometric sense, it is just a point of intersection, not the point where objects actually "vanish".

For example, what if the object approaching the vanishing point was a bright light? (e.g. a ship pointing a searchlight back at the observer).  An observer would still see it, even if he were short-sighted*.

*Please don't ask my for "proof", because you have never provide any yourself.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2008, 03:05:38 AM by Moon squirter »
I haven't performed it and I've never claimed to. I've have trouble being in two places at the same time.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: Question
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2008, 01:44:57 PM »
Quote
Tom, that is just so wrong:  You (and Wrongbothem) are confusing "vanishing points" with limits of resolution.  An observer's perceived vanishing point does not change, no matter how bad his eyesight is;  In a geometric sense, it is just a point of intersection, not  the point where objects actually "vanish".

When I blur my eyes the distant details of the horizon sure seem to vanish and become indescribable to me.

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Moon squirter

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Re: Question
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2008, 01:52:47 AM »
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Tom, that is just so wrong:  You (and Wrongbothem) are confusing "vanishing points" with limits of resolution.  An observer's perceived vanishing point does not change, no matter how bad his eyesight is;  In a geometric sense, it is just a point of intersection, not  the point where objects actually "vanish".

When I blur my eyes the distant details of the horizon sure seem to vanish and become indescribable to me.

But that's nothing to do with perspective vanishing points, which are geometric lines which intersect in the distance.  All you are doing is limiting your resolution so that the object will "disappear".

Are you saying that when you blur your eyes, it changes the imaginary perspective lines?
I haven't performed it and I've never claimed to. I've have trouble being in two places at the same time.

Re: Question
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2008, 10:53:33 PM »
Quote
Tom, that is just so wrong:  You (and Wrongbothem) are confusing "vanishing points" with limits of resolution.  An observer's perceived vanishing point does not change, no matter how bad his eyesight is;  In a geometric sense, it is just a point of intersection, not  the point where objects actually "vanish".

When I blur my eyes the distant details of the horizon sure seem to vanish and become indescribable to me.

LOL!!!

pay attention to math, geometry, and geography next time, you might learn something!
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mail.

Re: Question
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2008, 08:26:36 PM »
Quote
Tom, that is just so wrong:  You (and Wrongbothem) are confusing "vanishing points" with limits of resolution.  An observer's perceived vanishing point does not change, no matter how bad his eyesight is;  In a geometric sense, it is just a point of intersection, not  the point where objects actually "vanish".

When I blur my eyes the distant details of the horizon sure seem to vanish and become indescribable to me.

Tom, if you close your eyes the so called "horizon" disappears altogether! How can the horizon exist if it can be made to disappear as easily as that!

Another victory for FE!
pwned.