wind

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wind
« on: October 21, 2008, 03:12:34 PM »
why does the wind on a FE always go from west to east?
oh so now the moon is in on the conspiracy too?

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General Douchebag

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Re: wind
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2008, 04:18:40 PM »
Who the fuck told you that?
No but I'm guess your what? 90? Cause you just so darn mature </sarcasm>

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ﮎingulaЯiτy

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Re: wind
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2008, 04:20:18 PM »
This is RE...
If I was asked to imagine a perfect deity, I would never invent one that suffers from a multiple personality disorder. Christians get points for originality there.

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General Douchebag

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Re: wind
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2008, 04:23:45 PM »
What's this guy talking about, Singularity?
No but I'm guess your what? 90? Cause you just so darn mature </sarcasm>

Re: wind
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2008, 05:19:46 PM »
NO! SCOOBY DOO ON CARTOON NET WORK WAS WRONG!!!
oh so now the moon is in on the conspiracy too?

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ﮎingulaЯiτy

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Re: wind
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2008, 09:03:29 PM »
What's this guy talking about, Singularity?
I have not yet learned his language, but I am guessing that he lives in an area in which wind blows west to east. He presumes RE is correct and probably thinks that wind generally travel in that direction all over the globe, perhaps due to rotation or something. If my assumptions about his assumptions are true, he thinks that the FE model conforms to the flawed universal west to east wind, which doesn't work on FE. Flattening a flawed RE wind model would create a flawed FE model, hence the question he posed.
Summary, I have no goddamn clue.
If I was asked to imagine a perfect deity, I would never invent one that suffers from a multiple personality disorder. Christians get points for originality there.

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Conspiracy Mastermind

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Re: wind
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 03:42:52 AM »
why does the wind on a FE always go from west to east?
The Antimoon. (Yes, I am back, and I'm dragging the antimoon back with me)
The antimoon orbits below the earth, it's gravity drags the air, creating winds and hurricanes, much like the tides of the regular moon.
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Re: wind
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2008, 01:48:02 AM »
I have not yet learned his language, but I am guessing that he lives in an area in which wind blows west to east. He presumes RE is correct and probably thinks that wind generally travel in that direction all over the globe, perhaps due to rotation or something. If my assumptions about his assumptions are true, he thinks that the FE model conforms to the flawed universal west to east wind, which doesn't work on FE. Flattening a flawed RE wind model would create a flawed FE model, hence the question he posed.

Although his original question was flawed, there is some validity in the line of reasoning.  In the RE model, the direction of wind and the location of the wind bands are explainable through a combination of Coriolis and temperature differential.

What explanation does the FE model have?  The motion of the FE Sun wouldn't seem to create the temperature patterns that are necessary to use the RE model of the prevailing wind, and the lack of rotation eliminates Coriolis.

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MadDogX

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Re: wind
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2008, 03:46:18 AM »
Wind is part of the conspiracy. Those so-called wind power generators in the countryside are in fact large fans that create the wind. By spreading the ridiculous notion that a spinning propeller could create energy, the conspiracy has found a clever way to hide their "wind generators" in plain sight. Haven't you noticed how they always seem to be pointing in the direction the wind is blowing? That is because they are causing the wind! It's so obvious, but people refuse to see it because they blindly accept what they are told by the evil government.


PS: For those who don't get it - </sarcasm>.
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zeroply

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Re: wind
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2008, 11:38:56 AM »
why does the wind on a FE always go from west to east?

It doesn't. It's blowing from the North where I am now.

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Fileffel

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Re: wind
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2008, 12:06:17 PM »
It doesn't. It's blowing from the North where I am now.

Owned
Robot Fidel Castro will rub is pube-beard all over your ignorant capitalist faces!

Re: wind
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2008, 09:36:44 AM »
why does the wind on a FE always go from west to east?
The Antimoon. (Yes, I am back, and I'm dragging the antimoon back with me)
The antimoon orbits below the earth, it's gravity drags the air, creating winds and hurricanes, much like the tides of the regular moon.

Please describe this antimoon in more detail to me. The force of gravity, as predicted by Newton (and observed through the ages to be correct), affects all matter. Why does this antimoon only affect air? And how does it create the wind patterns? The doldrums? The jet streams?

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Perfect Circle

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Re: wind
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2008, 12:32:06 PM »
why does the wind on a FE always go from west to east?
The Antimoon. (Yes, I am back, and I'm dragging the antimoon back with me)
The antimoon orbits below the earth, it's gravity drags the air, creating winds and hurricanes, much like the tides of the regular moon.
So now gravity only affects air? And last I checked, the direction of the wind does not match up at all with tides.
Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

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Earthquakesdontbend

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Re: wind
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2008, 12:44:52 PM »
"Gravity" as described by flat-earthers, is a force that affects celestial objects, water and air. Not ground though, and certainly not Tom Bishop.
I was thinking of putting up the "top ten shapes of the earth". I've got Pyramid Earth and Cubic Earth so far...

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Perfect Circle

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Re: wind
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2008, 12:51:33 PM »
"Gravity" as described by flat-earthers, is a force that affects celestial objects, water and air. Not ground though, and certainly not Tom Bishop.
So the tides should match up with wind direction then. Which they don't.
Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

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Emir Parkreiner

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Re: wind
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2008, 12:53:01 PM »
"Gravity" as described by flat-earthers, is a force that affects celestial objects, water and air. Not ground though, and certainly not Tom Bishop.
So the tides should match up with wind direction then. Which they don't.
Perhaps the anti-moon has a stronger effect on the oceans then the atmosphere.

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Earthquakesdontbend

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Re: wind
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2008, 12:53:30 PM »
It has to be that way, otherwise they would have to invent another supernatural force governing wind and air separately.
I was thinking of putting up the "top ten shapes of the earth". I've got Pyramid Earth and Cubic Earth so far...

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Perfect Circle

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Re: wind
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2008, 12:57:51 PM »
"Gravity" as described by flat-earthers, is a force that affects celestial objects, water and air. Not ground though, and certainly not Tom Bishop.
So the tides should match up with wind direction then. Which they don't.
Perhaps the anti-moon has a stronger effect on the oceans then the atmosphere.
So when they are moving in opposite directions, what is going on? Are there two separate anti-moons? Like an aqua-antimoon and an atmos-antimoon?
Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

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General Douchebag

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Re: wind
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2008, 01:13:24 PM »
It doesn't. It's blowing from the North where I am now.

Owned

Everything after that is bullshit. We do not believe in gravity at all, neither do most intelligent REers. The Antimoon, it is theorised (But not all FEers think this to be true), has a gravitational pull, like the normal Moon in both FE and RE, but this isn't strong enough to really affect anything more than the tides.

The antimoon is a PE idea, not generally an FE one, okay?
No but I'm guess your what? 90? Cause you just so darn mature </sarcasm>

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Perfect Circle

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Re: wind
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2008, 01:38:06 PM »
It doesn't. It's blowing from the North where I am now.

Owned

Everything after that is bullshit. We do not believe in gravity at all, neither do most intelligent REers. The Antimoon, it is theorised (But not all FEers think this to be true), has a gravitational pull, like the normal Moon in both FE and RE, but this isn't strong enough to really affect anything more than the tides.

The antimoon is a PE idea, not generally an FE one, okay?
So explain this on a flat earth:

Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

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PeopleOnBehalfOfLogic

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Re: wind
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2008, 02:48:52 PM »
Good question. In fact, it is so good I am making a new topic on it. Come join.
Just noticed my name is actually pretty insulting. Apologies.

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markjo

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Re: wind
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2008, 07:40:40 AM »
The Antimoon, it is theorised (But not all FEers think this to be true), has a gravitational pull, like the normal Moon in both FE and RE, but this isn't strong enough to really affect anything more than the tides.

And it appears to be selective enough not to affect any of the FE material between the anti-moon and the oceans unknown miles above.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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Re: wind
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2008, 07:58:51 AM »
Gravity is not a theory recognised personally by me, I believe that the universe is moving upwards creating the effect of falling objects when they are infact staying still. This means that wind and 'gravity' have no correlation because 'gravity' does not exist.

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Earthquakesdontbend

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Re: wind
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2008, 09:51:30 AM »
So... how do you explain tides? They seem to match quite well with the moon...

And if the moon can pull water, it should be able to pull air. Also, I heard from somewhere that there may be connections between volcanic eruptions and the phases of the moon, possibly due to a gravitational pull. I will try to find sources.
I was thinking of putting up the "top ten shapes of the earth". I've got Pyramid Earth and Cubic Earth so far...

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General Douchebag

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Re: wind
« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2008, 11:35:15 AM »
The Antimoon, it is theorised (But not all FEers think this to be true), has a gravitational pull, like the normal Moon in both FE and RE, but this isn't strong enough to really affect anything more than the tides.

And it appears to be selective enough not to affect any of the FE material between the anti-moon and the oceans unknown miles above.

Like I say, it's a PE thing, I don't agree with it myself.
No but I'm guess your what? 90? Cause you just so darn mature </sarcasm>

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PeopleOnBehalfOfLogic

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Re: wind
« Reply #25 on: November 28, 2008, 12:20:36 PM »
Since my topic has been locked (why?) I'm back here.

So if the antimatter moon is a false theory, what controls the wind? What is YOUR favourite theory?
Just noticed my name is actually pretty insulting. Apologies.

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General Douchebag

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Re: wind
« Reply #26 on: November 28, 2008, 02:43:27 PM »
First of all, it isn't an antimatter moon. Second, I never said it's just false, I said it's a part of an entirely separate theory. Third, the antimoon does not control the wind, or even the tides (I apologise for that, I was wrong), but gravitational variation. Fourth, what does the shape of the Earth have to do with the weather? (Apart from the Coriolis effect)
No but I'm guess your what? 90? Cause you just so darn mature </sarcasm>

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PeopleOnBehalfOfLogic

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Re: wind
« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2008, 02:42:05 PM »
So the coriolis effect doesn't matter? Anyway, what about the size and shape of antarctica?
Just noticed my name is actually pretty insulting. Apologies.