"How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"

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"How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« on: September 29, 2008, 06:12:42 PM »
"How can an airplane mysteriously follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"

You read it correctly. Yes!!!! How does the airplane never fly above its cruising altitude as the curvature of the Earth's surface quickly declines beneath the airplane? This should increase the altitude of the level the airplane is flying having the pilots intervene periodically to descend the nose of the aircraft back to cruising altitude.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2008, 06:18:07 PM by Punisher »

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 02:35:00 AM »
The autopilot/pilot is always making constant adjustments to correct for air currents. The small adjustments needed to keep the plane at the right altitude would be part of these.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2008, 10:36:23 AM »

The autopilot/pilot is always making constant adjustments to correct for air currents. The small adjustments needed to keep the plane at the right altitude would be part of these.

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2008, 11:25:18 AM »

The autopilot/pilot is always making constant adjustments to correct for air currents. The small adjustments needed to keep the plane at the right altitude would be part of these.

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....


You were measuring them the whole time, were you?

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markjo

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2008, 12:31:26 PM »

The autopilot/pilot is always making constant adjustments to correct for air currents. The small adjustments needed to keep the plane at the right altitude would be part of these.

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....


Ailerons are for roll control (banking left or right).  The elevators at the back of the plane are for pitch control (up/down).
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Ski

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2008, 02:34:47 PM »
Whether FE or RE, this is related to density altitude. The plane will naturally settle where the lift and weight are at equilibrium.
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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2008, 02:40:08 PM »
Whether FE or RE, this is related to density altitude. The plane will naturally settle where the lift and weight are at equilibrium.

i don't think anyone could argue this one so is the topic closed?

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2008, 06:03:53 PM »

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....
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You were measuring them the whole time, were you?

Com'on dude, I'm not trying to get on your case, just making you think, and I have sat a whole flight next to a wing seat and also the cheapo seats at the last row where you can hear the motors of the elevators (tail end), everyone knows them noises of the wing and tail.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2008, 06:15:49 PM »

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....
------------------------------------------------
Ailerons are for roll control (banking left or right).  The elevators at the back of the plane are for pitch control (up/down).
True enough, hard to see those tail elevators but you can hear the motor of the elevators, just like you can hear the motors of the aileron and spoilers, oh yes, and flaps too. I have flown on the cheapo seats, no noise, no nose pitch of the aircraft every now and about. The Earth is Flat.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2008, 06:31:20 PM »

[/quote]
True enough, hard to see those tail elevators but you can hear the motor of the elevators, just like you can hear the motors of the aileron and spoilers, oh yes, and flaps too. I have flown on the cheapo seats, no noise, no nose pitch of the aircraft every now and about. The Earth is Flat.
[/quote]

even IF the earth was flat i'm SURE turbulence would be a more reasonable explanation, or your hearing something else would also be more reasonable than to claim because something n a plane moved the earth is flat...

besides as already stated the plane wouldn't be able to fly in lower air pressures up in the highest levels of the atmosphere and would just find an equilibrium.

http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/phonedrmarc/2003_april.shtml and yes i know its nasa but not many websites are devoted to explaining something that is common sense.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2008, 06:50:22 PM »

The Earth is Flat.

This may be simply for you to answer, and may sound stupid. But nonetheless I'd like to have it cleared up.

The FE theory claims the Earth is moving upward in space, thus causing the sensation we RE'ers call Gravity. Wouldn't the plane, after takeoff, be slammed by the upward moving Earth if we were simply flying horizontal?

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Parsifal

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2008, 06:54:05 PM »
The FE theory claims the Earth is moving upward in space, thus causing the sensation we RE'ers call Gravity. Wouldn't the plane, after takeoff, be slammed by the upward moving Earth if we were simply flying horizontal?

No. Learn some basic physics.
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markjo

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2008, 07:28:50 PM »

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....
------------------------------------------------
Ailerons are for roll control (banking left or right).  The elevators at the back of the plane are for pitch control (up/down).
True enough, hard to see those tail elevators but you can hear the motor of the elevators, just like you can hear the motors of the aileron and spoilers, oh yes, and flaps too. I have flown on the cheapo seats, no noise, no nose pitch of the aircraft every now and about. The Earth is Flat.

Ever heard of trim tabs? 

Quote from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trim_tab
Elevator trim frees the pilot from constantly adjusting the pitch controls. A longitudinal trim control (often in the shape of a wheel) is adjusted by the pilot to cancel out control forces for a given airspeed or weight distribution. When the trim control is rotated forward the nose is held down and conversely if the trim wheel is moved back the tail becomes heavy. Many newer aircraft, especially jet aircraft have electric trim controls.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2008, 08:17:28 PM »

Wrong, if you have ever been on a plane the flaps of the wings (aileron) never move not once at cruising level....
------------------------------------------------
Ailerons are for roll control (banking left or right).  The elevators at the back of the plane are for pitch control (up/down).
------------------------------------------------
True enough, hard to see those tail elevators but you can hear the motor of the elevators, just like you can hear the motors of the aileron and spoilers, oh yes, and flaps too. I have flown on the cheapo seats, no noise, no nose pitch of the aircraft every now and about. The Earth is Flat.
------------------------------------------------
Ever heard of trim tabs? 

Elevator trim frees the pilot from constantly adjusting the pitch controls. A longitudinal trim control (often in the shape of a wheel) is adjusted by the pilot to cancel out control forces for a given airspeed or weight distribution. When the trim control is rotated forward the nose is held down and conversely if the trim wheel is moved back the tail becomes heavy. Many newer aircraft, especially jet aircraft have electric trim controls.

Your agreeing the Earth is Flat.

At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude. Now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.


« Last Edit: September 30, 2008, 09:24:30 PM by Punisher »

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markjo

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2008, 08:28:10 PM »
Ever heard of trim tabs? 

Quote
Elevator trim frees the pilot from constantly adjusting the pitch controls. A longitudinal trim control (often in the shape of a wheel) is adjusted by the pilot to cancel out control forces for a given airspeed or weight distribution. When the trim control is rotated forward the nose is held down and conversely if the trim wheel is moved back the tail becomes heavy. Many newer aircraft, especially jet aircraft have electric trim controls.

Your agreeing the Earth is Flat.

At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude, now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.

Not necessarily.  The gravitational attraction of the earth is always perpendicular to the surface of the earth so an airplane in level flight would naturally want to follow that curvature in order to maintain its level.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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WardoggKC130FE

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2008, 08:52:37 PM »
Wow.  The fail of this thread is epic.  I mean truly epic.

Hydraulic boosted flight controls = no sound.



Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2008, 08:59:21 PM »

Ever heard of trim tabs? Elevator trim frees the pilot from constantly adjusting the pitch controls. A longitudinal trim control (often in the shape of a wheel) is adjusted by the pilot to cancel out control forces for a given airspeed or weight distribution. When the trim control is rotated forward the nose is held down and conversely if the trim wheel is moved back the tail becomes heavy. Many newer aircraft, especially jet aircraft have electric trim controls.
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Your agreeing the Earth is Flat.

At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude, now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.
-------------------------------------------------
Not necessarily.  The gravitational attraction of the earth is always perpendicular to the surface of the earth so an airplane in level flight would naturally want to follow that curvature in order to maintain its level.

This makes no sense at all, no sense at all! Perpendicular? Yes!!!! Perpendicular to point (A) because the trim tabs were adjusted then, but when the airplane reaches point (B) the curvature declines and new adjustment must be implemented to assure safety of air traffic.  


Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2008, 09:13:19 PM »
Wow.  The fail of this thread is epic.  I mean truly epic.

Hydraulic boosted flight controls = no sound.

How? Why? How do you always manage to shoot yourself in the foot when you reply?

The noise comes from the hydraulics, that's the sound of the aileron, the flap and spoiler, oh yes, the elevator too....

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2008, 07:34:07 AM »
I cannot believe this is a serious question. The plane does not need to make any adjustments to fly at constant altitute around a hypothetical round Earth. It has nothing to do with sound, it has to do with physics.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2008, 08:47:18 AM »
I cannot believe this is a serious question. The plane does not need to make any adjustments to fly at constant altitute around a hypothetical round Earth. It has nothing to do with sound, it has to do with physics.

I can't believe you can't explain it!!!!!! The pilot would have to adjust the altitude periodically on a round Earth which by the way DOESN'T happen. And because you can't defend the round lie, the truth of the matter is that the Earth is flat.

[At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude, now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.]

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AmateurAstronomer

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2008, 09:03:52 AM »
A better question would be how a plane follows the longitudinal curve... Shortest path?

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MadDogX

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2008, 09:04:58 AM »
Whether FE or RE, this is related to density altitude. The plane will naturally settle where the lift and weight are at equilibrium.
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Okay, I admit it.  The earth isn't flat.

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WardoggKC130FE

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2008, 09:23:46 AM »
I cannot believe this is a serious question. The plane does not need to make any adjustments to fly at constant altitute around a hypothetical round Earth. It has nothing to do with sound, it has to do with physics.

I can't believe you can't explain it!!!!!! The pilot would have to adjust the altitude periodically on a round Earth which by the way DOESN'T happen. And because you can't defend the round lie, the truth of the matter is that the Earth is flat.

[At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude, now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.]


First off all trim tabs are electric and "engaged" even before the engines start up on the ground.  Some flight control surfaces don't have trim tabs they can just be trimmed and those use a cable system.  Either way you can't hear them.  I will give you the flaps, but usually that is because there is a pressure restrictor somewhere in the system to prevent high hydraulic pressure from tearing up the gearbox that drives the flaps.  Spoilers use the same system as the aileron, elevator, and rudder.  Again, silent.  

The reason an aircraft can follow the "curvature" of the earth is pressure.  The autopilot maintains a constant MSL altitude by staying at a set pressure once it has reached up to its cruising level.  Now while at this set MSL altitude, the aircraft may actually change it's AGL altitude as you fly along if the pressure changes.   But the pilot only knows this if he has a radar altimeter that is on at altitude.  Most don't.  Otherwise as long as the main altimeter stays at the assigned MSL altitude it's good to go.


Whether FE or RE, this is related to density altitude. The plane will naturally settle where the lift and weight are at equilibrium.

This is partially incorrect.  The first part is correct the second part is not.  Lift and weight distribution have to be at equilibrium upon takeoff.  Otherwise the aircraft will either not get off the ground or flip over once airborne and crash.



Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2008, 09:44:43 AM »

I can't believe you can't explain it!!!!!! The pilot would have to adjust the altitude periodically on a round Earth which by the way DOESN'T happen. And because you can't defend the round lie, the truth of the matter is that the Earth is flat.

[At point (A) the airplane reaches cruising altitude and pilot engages trim tabs, the ground below is a given 34,000 ft, upon reaching point (B) 500 miles later the ground below curved underneath around the so-called round Earth and gained altitude, now the airplane has to reach point (E), therefore altitude adjustment must be implemented or air routes are compromised.]
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First off all trim tabs are electric and "engaged" even before the engines start up on the ground.  

Why? How? Why shoot your other foot off?
http://www.boeing-727.com/Data/systems/infohydraulics.html


The reason an aircraft can follow the "curvature" of the earth is pressure.  The autopilot maintains a constant MSL altitude by staying at a set pressure once it has reached up to its cruising level.  Now while at this set MSL altitude, the aircraft may actually change it's AGL altitude as you fly along if the pressure changes.   But the pilot only knows this if he has a radar altimeter that is on at altitude.  Most don't.  Otherwise as long as the main altimeter stays at the assigned MSL altitude it's good to go.

Lock and load. Yes!!!! Perpendicular to point (A) because the trim tabs were adjusted then, but when the airplane reaches point (B) the curvature declines and new adjustment must be implemented to assure safety of air traffic. 

And all commercial airlines have these barometers adjusted on the aircraft. Either way, which ever way you choose to represent your point whether the aircraft follows the surface of the Earth or the pressure of the air both curve on a round Earth and because the airplane is flying perpendicular AT point (A) being surface or air upon reaching point (B) adjustments will have to be made using Hydraulic elevators - noise - nose pitch - go back to bed!!!!!



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AmateurAstronomer

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2008, 09:49:25 AM »
On real world flight paths the red line would be the shortest path... Have we become so whipped here that we don't see that any more? I could give a fuck less about keeping a plane level...

Do RE'ers no longer assert that the whole curving flight path theory is fishy to say the least? Have we stopped asking why you cannot fly in a straight line between points?
Reality becomes apparent to the patient observer. Or you can learn a thing or two if you're in a hurry.

Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2008, 09:50:32 AM »

A better question would be how a plane follows the longitudinal curve... Shortest path?

Explain your point and question with more words. If I did understand correctly same reason why they don't fly over the North pole to get to Asia. D-E-C-E-P-T-I-O-N

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E349

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2008, 09:52:04 AM »
Wow.  The fail of this thread is epic.  I mean truly epic.

I concur. Although I am unable to explain this phenomenon (I have yet to take a school course in physics) I can assure you that planes do not constantly trim their flight to maintain altitude. Just as a rock that is tied to one's finger may be kept spinning about it, a plane that is pulled to the earth by the force of gravity will not just float off into space bacause it is going fast

As for your "evidence" in the form of hearing observations, there is no way that you could have heard a commercial jet's hydrolics from inside the cabin (which can be as loud as 86 decibels).
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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2008, 09:52:28 AM »

Do RE'ers no longer assert that the whole curving flight path theory is fishy to say the least? Have we stopped asking why you cannot fly in a straight line between points?

100% in agreement!!!!

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E349

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2008, 09:59:20 AM »

A better question would be how a plane follows the longitudinal curve... Shortest path?

Explain your point and question with more words. If I did understand correctly same reason why they don't fly over the North pole to get to Asia. D-E-C-E-P-T-I-O-N

"They"? Who is this generic "they"? If you mean flights from australia then it is obvious why they do not fly over the North Pole to get to Asia - that would take forever. If you mean flights from north america then you are simply fail at geography - they do fly over the arctic ocean to get to asia. In either case this was not a very convincing arguement.
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E349

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Re: "How does a plane follow the curvature of the Earth's atmosphere?"
« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2008, 10:03:01 AM »
wouldn't the centripetal force of a round earth bring the plane crashing down since the force downward is more than gravity? I think i have busted the round earth conspiracy

Huh? Do you even know what centripetal force is? Do you know what keeps a plane in the air? I think that you better understand these concepts before you pursue this discussion any further.
If not responding is a win, then FET has won many times. You just won a small battle yourself.
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