Variations in gravity

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Variations in gravity
« on: September 12, 2008, 04:46:39 AM »
First of all I would like apologise for spamming this forum with three new threads. Especially when I found the answers from the search to two of them. However I did not find ansver this to this question. How can gravity have slightly different streght on different parts of the earth if the earth accellerates at constant speed?

Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2008, 05:04:56 AM »
Been alot of topics about this fact.

I believe 'their' reason was that the earth isnt in perfect balance and tiltes abit...

also it might had something to do with the moon and sun or something ;)

Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2008, 05:21:54 AM »
Ok thanks I guess I just did not use the right search words to search this forum. However I really can't see how the tilting or moon/sun can explain this: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap030723.html I know that this is from a conspiracy nasa pseudolite but similar readings can be measured on ground based tests.

And if some part of the earth would be tilted shouln't gravity press us slightly sideways?
« Last Edit: September 12, 2008, 05:38:34 AM by jargo »

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Dr Matrix

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2008, 05:45:26 AM »
And if some part of the earth would be tilted shouln't gravity press us slightly sideways?

How do you determine what 'level ground' is at the moment? It would feel the same as being on a slight hill in the RE model...

Alternatively, if you allow gravitation in the FE model then the differences can be explained in the conventional manner (local mass/altitude variation etc...)
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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2008, 06:43:09 AM »

How do you determine what 'level ground' is at the moment? It would feel the same as being on a slight hill in the RE model...

That's because you would be on slight hill neither on re or fe model. If you stand on tilted surface the strenght of gravity will not change only its direction compared to the angle of surface you are standing on. You could still easily measure the real strenght of gravity simply by measuring the direction where it is strongest. And measuring the streght of the gravity to that direction.

Also the moon/sun gravity theory does no work because they move but low/high gravity areas do not.

Alternatively, if you allow gravitation in the FE model then the differences can be explained in the conventional manner (local mass/altitude variation etc...)

Yes if you would allow that there would be no problem. But the faq says that earth has no gravity.

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Jack

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2008, 07:01:12 AM »
How can gravity have slightly different streght on different parts of the earth if the earth accellerates at constant speed?
The different gravitational pulls of the celestial bodies above the Earth can account for this effect.

Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2008, 07:05:42 AM »
How can gravity have slightly different streght on different parts of the earth if the earth accellerates at constant speed?
The different gravitational pulls of the celestial bodies above the Earth can account for this effect.

Then why doesn't the high/low gravity areas move when the celestial bodies do?

Edit: Small correction sun/moon and planets do cause small shifts in gravity but the gravity map does no correlate with these shifts For example havaji has stroger gravity than the ocean surrounding no matter how the celestial objects are positioned.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2008, 08:16:22 AM by jargo »

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Kira-SY

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2008, 08:41:01 AM »
Furthermore there is no clear reason in FE why stars have a gravitational pull, and earth doesn't.
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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2008, 09:22:46 AM »
Furthermore there is no clear reason in FE why stars have a gravitational pull, and earth doesn't.

The faq tells that clearly. Earth does not have gravity because snakes does not have legs. ;D

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Ski

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2008, 09:32:12 AM »
Furthermore there is no clear reason in FE why stars have a gravitational pull, and earth doesn't.

If we assume Einstein is correct, then the stars obviously contribute more to the stress-energy tensor (or psuedotensor) than the earth. They are more energetic and/or dense.

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2008, 12:13:19 AM »
Furthermore there is no clear reason in FE why stars have a gravitational pull, and earth doesn't.

If we assume Einstein is correct, then the stars obviously contribute more to the stress-energy tensor (or psuedotensor) than the earth. They are more energetic and/or dense.

If we assume that Einstein is correct then earth should have gravity as well.

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Parsifal

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Re: Variations in gravity
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2008, 04:11:55 AM »
If we assume that Einstein is correct then earth should have gravity as well.

Lol.
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