daylight times

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Parsifal

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2008, 03:11:29 AM »
Well, I'm sure you had a week's worth of weather in that day.

It was a fine day, actually. Then we got on the Spirit of Tasmania at the end of it. This was before it came all the way up to Sydney. I remember exploring the ship at night; I can't have been more than fifteen at the time. The sea intrigues me; there's so much of it, and it's mostly unpolluted by humankind. The night also intrigues me. So naturally, being on the sea at night was fun.
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2008, 08:53:53 AM »
elevation should not affect the result as long as the elevation does not change you should still get 12hr of sun.

Wrong.

Elevation will affect the results insofar as that implies that you live in a hilly/mountainous area (like I do).  If you observe from the bottom of the hill, then you do not get to see the sun set below the true horizon because the will set below the visible horizon of the hill/mountain first.  There have been times when I've seen the sun set behind a hill in the distance then quickly gone to the top of another hill and seen the sun set again, this time below something much closer to the true horizon.

Having said that, I would say that the location for the sun rise/set observations should somewhere that provides as close to a true horizon as practical (however, I don't think that a few minutes difference should be significant).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/Horizons.svg

One other thing while I'm still thinking about it.  Since this little experiment is designed to test the RE prediction of the amount of daylight during the equinox, we should also be testing how much daylight would be predicted by FE.  Does anyone know how to make the FE prediction for the duration of daylight at a certain latitude on the day of the equinox?
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Parsifal

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #32 on: September 01, 2008, 08:58:51 AM »
Elevation will affect the results insofar as that implies that you live in a hilly/mountainous area (like I do).  If you observe from the bottom of the hill, then you do not get to see the sun set below the true horizon because the will set below the visible horizon of the hill/mountain first.  There have been times when I've seen the sun set behind a hill in the distance then quickly gone to the top of another hill and seen the sun set again, this time below something much closer to the true horizon.

Having said that, I would say that the location for the sun rise/set observations should somewhere that provides as close to a true horizon as practical (however, I don't think that a few minutes difference should be significant).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/Horizons.svg

One other thing while I'm still thinking about it.  Since this little experiment is designed to test the RE prediction of the amount of daylight during the equinox, we should also be testing how much daylight would be predicted by FE.  Does anyone know how to make the FE prediction for the duration of daylight at a certain latitude on the day of the equinox?

The person in that picture is very tall.

Also, the prime location would be at sea level, with ocean extending to the horizon.

Also also, the FE model is not yet developed enough to make that prediction, to my knowledge.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2008, 09:00:43 AM by Osama bin Laden »
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #33 on: September 01, 2008, 09:04:25 AM »
One other thing while I'm still thinking about it.  Since this little experiment is designed to test the RE prediction of the amount of daylight during the equinox, we should also be testing how much daylight would be predicted by FE.  Does anyone know how to make the FE prediction for the duration of daylight at a certain latitude on the day of the equinox?

The only thing I could find was one of Usernames old posts:

While working on my paper I realized I stated something wrong a few times in the past.  Here is the correction:

aetheric eddification angle = arcos(-tan( latitude )  x  tan(  23.45 * sin [360 / 365 * (284 + Day )] ) )

Is the new formula that is actually accurate (though an approximation).  The previous one was just plain out wrong.  I have also decided to discontinue use of aetheric refraction for the more accurate new term aetheric eddification.

If anyone sees glaring errors in this new formula, let me know.

This formula accurately predicts sunrises and sunsets.  Furthermore, although I need to investigate if this also explains the rotation of heavenly bodies in the night sky.  My guess is it does, or is not complete yet and will when it is.




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WardoggKC130FE

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #34 on: September 01, 2008, 09:08:05 AM »
Nice Find!!

Re: daylight times
« Reply #35 on: September 01, 2008, 09:20:53 AM »
Nice Find!!

Thanks  :-*

I should be able to record daylight times this equinox. Its on the 22nd of September.

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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2008, 09:22:01 AM »
Elevation will affect the results insofar as that implies that you live in a hilly/mountainous area (like I do).  If you observe from the bottom of the hill, then you do not get to see the sun set below the true horizon because the will set below the visible horizon of the hill/mountain first.  There have been times when I've seen the sun set behind a hill in the distance then quickly gone to the top of another hill and seen the sun set again, this time below something much closer to the true horizon.

Having said that, I would say that the location for the sun rise/set observations should somewhere that provides as close to a true horizon as practical (however, I don't think that a few minutes difference should be significant).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/Horizons.svg

One other thing while I'm still thinking about it.  Since this little experiment is designed to test the RE prediction of the amount of daylight during the equinox, we should also be testing how much daylight would be predicted by FE.  Does anyone know how to make the FE prediction for the duration of daylight at a certain latitude on the day of the equinox?

The person in that picture is very tall.
And the earth in that picture is very small.  BFHD (Big Fat Hair Deal)

Quote
Also, the prime location would be at sea level, with ocean extending to the horizon.
Agreed.  However, I don't think that very many people on this board have access to their own private islands (well, maybe Rig Navigator does), so we will have to make do with the locations that we do have access to.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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WardoggKC130FE

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #37 on: September 01, 2008, 09:45:57 AM »
Did I mention I live in Hawaii.

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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #38 on: September 01, 2008, 02:37:20 PM »
Did I mention I live in Hawaii.

Yes you did, and we are all (well, some of us at least) are quite jealous.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
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It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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WardoggKC130FE

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #39 on: September 01, 2008, 02:38:56 PM »
The point being, barring any clouds(which I give as a 50/50 shot at both rise and set) I will see both.

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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #40 on: September 01, 2008, 03:26:17 PM »
The point being, barring any clouds(which I give as a 50/50 shot at both rise and set) I will see both.

And that's very good and useful.  However, I believe that observers at more northerly and southerly locations are needed as well as they would be in a smaller portion of the FE sun's "spotlight" and should different amounts of daylight than observers closer to the equator and the larger part of the spotlight.  If we could get Gayer to join in and give us an observation from Finland, that would be very useful data.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
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Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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Kira-SY

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #41 on: September 01, 2008, 05:28:50 PM »
Spanish guy here, but in september the 22nd I'll be in Poland. Something for me to do? (RE'er)
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Parsifal

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #42 on: September 02, 2008, 02:25:25 AM »
Agreed.  However, I don't think that very many people on this board have access to their own private islands (well, maybe Rig Navigator does), so we will have to make do with the locations that we do have access to.

I understand that. I can definitely observe the sunrise across the sea, as I live in Sydney, which is on the east coast of Australia. I'm contemplating where best to observe the sunset, though - the terrain west of here is anything but flat, and it's not like it can be solved by a short journey further west because there's a mountain range just outside the Sydney metropolitan area. If I start driving early enough in the afternoon, I can get to the other side of the mountain range by sunset (it's more than two hours away), where the terrain is flat and not very high above sea level all the way to the horizon, but don't count on it.

Edit: I just realised that such a significant change in longitude would affect the results considerably. I could, of course, compensate for this mathematically if desired. Alternatively, I could head north, where I could perhaps find a flat viewing location at the same longitude as Sydney, but that would be an even longer drive.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2008, 02:28:48 AM by Osama bin Laden »
I'm going to side with the white supremacists.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #43 on: September 02, 2008, 03:27:13 AM »
I would think any change of location between Sunrise and Sunset would compromise the results. Also, will making a note of the time be sufficient? Will photographic evidence be required, and if so, will a photograph with a time stamp on it be acceptable? Easily faked I realise.
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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #44 on: September 02, 2008, 07:16:18 PM »
I take it that no FE'er is going to participate?  Do I smell a victory for RE?
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #45 on: September 03, 2008, 12:25:42 AM »
i am a RE but i will take a shot at a FE answer.


its a perspective effect

*insert long winded quote from some random book that nobody can be arsed to read*
i believe the world is an oblate spheroid. anything i say that contradicts this is purely for the sake of argument.

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markjo

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #46 on: September 03, 2008, 05:10:49 AM »
i am a RE but i will take a shot at a FE answer.


its a perspective effect

*insert long winded quote from some random book that nobody can be arsed to read*

Please read the thread before responding.  I am not asking for an FE explanation for sunrise/sunset.   I am asking for FE believers to help in an experiment to observer and report the actual times of sunrise and sunset on the day of the upcoming equinox.  I believe that if we are able to record enough data points from different parts of the planet, then we will be able to either confirm or refute the "spotlight" nature of the FE sun.
Science is what happens when preconception meets verification.
Quote from: Robosteve
Besides, perhaps FET is a conspiracy too.
Quote from: bullhorn
It is just the way it is, you understanding it doesn't concern me.

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spacemanjones

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #47 on: September 03, 2008, 11:07:32 AM »
Brisbane, Australia. Happy to do my part. It's pretty hilly where I am ... should I find a flat or elevated observation point?

So earth is not flat! ah ha! Hilly Earth Theory.. HET

Oh, count me in Omaha, NE (KOFF)
« Last Edit: September 03, 2008, 11:10:17 AM by spacemanjones »

Re: daylight times
« Reply #48 on: September 03, 2008, 12:40:07 PM »
I would think any change of location between Sunrise and Sunset would compromise the results. Also, will making a note of the time be sufficient? Will photographic evidence be required, and if so, will a photograph with a time stamp on it be acceptable? Easily faked I realise.
No this would not prove anything, this will simply show that there are more conspiritors than we ffirst thought.
I believe the earth is flat because I have a brain the size of a peanut.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #49 on: September 03, 2008, 01:04:27 PM »
I'm in western Massachusetts, USA.  I'm game to play if you need a data point from ym area of the world.

We need to clarify precisely how to measure what we're measuring.  Maybe a photo showing the sunrise/set with your cell phone displaying the date and time (not sure about global, but mine is set by the network...then again, mabe that would not be a good idea since the cell networks may be being duped by the conspiracy) up for example.  A compass may be useful as well to show the direction is accurate.

Someone get a world map out and start putting pushpins into it.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #50 on: September 03, 2008, 01:08:03 PM »
Quote
Someone get a world map out and start putting pushpins into it.
This would prove nothing, since we know that a real map of the earth doesn't exist.
I believe the earth is flat because I have a brain the size of a peanut.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #51 on: September 03, 2008, 01:39:53 PM »
Quote
Someone get a world map out and start putting pushpins into it.
This would prove nothing, since we know that a real map of the earth doesn't exist.

Nice job, noob, you are correct.
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Re: daylight times
« Reply #52 on: September 04, 2008, 04:32:45 AM »
Quote
Someone get a world map out and start putting pushpins into it.
This would prove nothing, since we know that a real map of the earth doesn't exist.

The map would not be used to prove anything, its to keep track that we're covering all major geographical areas.

Re: daylight times
« Reply #53 on: September 04, 2008, 02:55:11 PM »
Those of you participating in this interesting collection of data, it would also be helpful to note the position of the sun at sunrise and sunset.  It doesn't have to be exact, just use a compass and make as accurate an estimate as you reasonably can.

This will be useful in getting an accurate picture of the time and position of the sun at both sunrise and sunset.

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svenanders

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #54 on: September 10, 2008, 03:26:02 PM »
As RE'er I'll try to help out on this as well. My coordinates are: 67°16′58″N14°22′57″E.
I live in Bodoe, Norway, wich is pretty north. ;)

What data should I gather?

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Kira-SY

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #55 on: September 10, 2008, 03:38:02 PM »
So in 22th this month, we have to use a compass to know where the sun rises from, and also the time, right?
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dyno

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Re: daylight times
« Reply #56 on: September 10, 2008, 06:48:23 PM »
In Perth, Australia
I'm in