Horizont?

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Re: Horizont?
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2008, 03:17:51 PM »
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When looking at an island that is "halfway over the horizon", it does NOT change when im looking at it binoculars. It is still half dissapeared over the horizon.

Have you studied the views of the island between the eye and binoculars closely? It's often difficult to tell how much of an island is covered up unless you were specifically looking for it. Much of the distant foliage of an island is featureless and hard to discern.
Distant foliage? Dude, I live in Sweden, there is no foliage on the islands.
Its not difficult to tell at all.

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Adding to the case: The optics change the perspective, shouldnt that change how far you could look into and vanishing point? At least the magnification would..

It has been found that a good telescope with sufficient zoom will change the observer's perspective and bring the ship's hull back in full view. This is not possible if the ship were really behind a "hill of water." Hence, the effect which is usually thought to prove the earth as a globe really proves it to be a plane.

Thats a typical visual phenomena at sea. Its much like a mirage in a desert. (Sometimes it can be so strong that the most distant islands seems to float in air!)
You can try the same experiment at land, se if it is the same thing there. Look at two distant mountains fex. With and without optics.

It's one of the first and primary proofs of a Flat Earth. The fact that a telescope can restore a half-sunken ship demonstrates that the ship is not traveling behind a convex sea.
Im glad to hear that.
How do you know that the hull wasnt visible at first because of well-known optical phenomena at sea, and then visible because optics make you see better?
Can a "fully sunken" ship be restored? Has that been tested? If a "half sunken" ship can be "restored", then a ship where only the flag is visible could also be restored easely right?
Why does the bottom of the ship dissapear first? Wouldnt the ship first become really really small? So small you cant see it? Is the hull much further away then the masts?
Ooompa ooompa

Re: Horizont?
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2008, 03:39:03 PM »
More about bishops FE horizon..
On a flat surface, we can see further by fex highering ourself. Because the angle is changing, getting steeper (right word?).
When looking at fex a sailboat, the angle from view is different to the mast and to the hull. Because it has height.
When standing on a cliff thats higher than the boat. The angle from the eye to the hull is steeper than the angle to the masts. Thus, the hull should be visible longer/better.
When going into the horizon, the boat should start to dissapear, starting from the flag and then down. The last thing that dissapears is the hull.
Is this the case?

Ooompa ooompa

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Ski

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Re: Horizont?
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2008, 05:03:20 PM »
Were there no atmoplane you could infact see the entire earth. However, diffraction and refraction makes this impossible no matter what model you subscribe to.
"Never think you can turn over any old falsehood without a terrible squirming of the horrid little population that dwells under it." -O.W. Holmes "Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.."

Re: Horizont?
« Reply #33 on: August 08, 2008, 03:07:40 AM »
Bishop. Where are you?
Ooompa ooompa

Re: Horizont?
« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2008, 07:55:43 AM »
Bump..

Re: Horizont?
« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2008, 10:12:24 AM »
Were there no atmoplane you could infact see the entire earth. However, diffraction and refraction makes this impossible no matter what model you subscribe to.

Has this anything to do with the "sunken ship" example?
Ooompa ooompa