Long period comets

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Re: Long period comets
« Reply #60 on: August 14, 2008, 09:38:25 PM »
I don't know for sure, but wouldn't gravitational lensing not be possible if the change in trajectory was so slight?

Have no clue, ask someone with an astrophysics background.

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Dr Matrix

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Re: Long period comets
« Reply #61 on: August 15, 2008, 03:12:33 AM »
The Earth doesn't make a very good gravitational lens since it just isn't massive enough.  Even the Sun only deflects the apparent position of stars near it's observed rim by a couple of arcseconds - one of the 'original' GR experiments observed the magnitude of the Sun's lensing effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tests_of_general_relativity) although later observations were needed to clear up a controversy about the analysis.

My point was that the FE model demands a much larger curvature of light than gravitational effects of the Earth can produce in an RE model (and they are of the opposite sign).  You make a valid point that refraction is a problem for interferometers, although it's not as bad as you might think in a cotrolled lab environment.  If all else fails there are giant Michelson interferometers with kilometre-long baselines that run in evacuated tubes as part of the LIGO experiment (amazing setup - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ligo) which have not been troubled by the alleged FE light bending.
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Re: Long period comets
« Reply #62 on: August 16, 2008, 01:45:31 AM »
The Earth doesn't make a very good gravitational lens since it just isn't massive enough.  Even the Sun only deflects the apparent position of stars near it's observed rim by a couple of arcseconds - one of the 'original' GR experiments observed the magnitude of the Sun's lensing effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tests_of_general_relativity) although later observations were needed to clear up a controversy about the analysis.

That was what I figured, but my physics and astrophysics background is not up to this level of knowledge.


Quote
My point was that the FE model demands a much larger curvature of light than gravitational effects of the Earth can produce in an RE model (and they are of the opposite sign).  You make a valid point that refraction is a problem for interferometers, although it's not as bad as you might think in a cotrolled lab environment.  If all else fails there are giant Michelson interferometers with kilometre-long baselines that run in evacuated tubes as part of the LIGO experiment (amazing setup - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ligo) which have not been troubled by the alleged FE light bending.

It seems that if there was an "Electromagnetic Acceleration" effect, it would be visible when you observe a beam of coherent light after a "trip" of 300 km since it is supposed to be a significantly visible effect at much shorter distances.  Science is helping to study FE theories in the laboratory.